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Help me with a $1500 Midrange gaming/workstation PC

Dashel

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Nov 5, 2003
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Hey all, I've built my own PC's in the past but it's been a while now. I'm out of the loop. So if things have changed and I'm better off with a pre-built PC fill me in hah.

I'm looking for something powerful, but a good value that will last me at least 3 years or so.
$1500.00 US budget. Just the PC with OS, no monitor or peripherals. In the past I bought most of my stuff on Newegg or Amazon.

50% Workstation - Microsoft Word/Excel, Google Drive, various web apps etc
50% Gaming - Witcher 3, XCom 2, maybe a fps here or there. Should be able to handle something like Destiny 2 when it releases.

Prefer Intel chips
No overclocking. No fancy cooling needed.

I have a monitor, mouse, keyboard and a case.

Case: Phantek Enthoo Pro M
https://www.amazon.com/Phanteks-Acrylic-Computer-Anthracite-PH-ES515PA-AG/dp/B01F9UC1E8/

I need Windows 10 with it.

SSD is a must, and a storage HDD is fine but doesnt need to be huge. 1TB would be plenty.

Thanks for any help! If I missed anything let me know.
 

Dashel

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Nov 5, 2003
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I saw this post in another thread, this was super helpful:

Try sites like these to give you a general idea:

http://www.logicalincrements.com/

https://pcpartpicker.com

You can get a great system for $1,400-$1,500 and a high end gaming monitor for that resolution for around $700 with all the bells and whistles like 144hz / ips / g-sync.

If you do not want to wait for the new gen of stuff coming out, intels new cpu's and amd's vega gpu, then the base items would be like this:

1. I7 7700k
2. Gtx 1080ti
3. Either of these two:
https://www.amazon.com/PG279Q-2560x1440-G-SYNC-Gaming-Monitor/dp/B017EVR2VM/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1498592080&sr=8-4&keywords=1440p+g-sync+144hz

https://www.amazon.com/Acer-Predator-XB271HU-2560x1440-Display/dp/B0173PEX20/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1498592080&sr=8-5&keywords=1440p+g-sync+144hz

4. Shop around as this is based on your preference and what you feel you need such as front ports or a certain size / look.
5. 16 or 32 gb ddr4 ram
6. Modern 270 motherboard
7. You really do not need 3 hard drives for a gaming machine and a 2 TB hard drive will be plenty
8. A 480-500 gb ssd
9. Windows 10
10. A high rated 650 -750 watt power supply will be enough for a normal setup unless you do sli but doing that is not worth it really anymore.

That lead me here: https://pcpartpicker.com/guide/hsgXsY/excellent-gaming-build

So I'm checking that build out.

Can someone give me a quick recommendation or thoughts on the motherboard? That seems to be where I get stuck the most. I don't need a zillion features. Something modern and rock solid. Won't be overclocking.

Chip and video card seems easy enough. RAM, SSD and power supply I think I can figure out.
 

EliteRetard

Diamond Member
Mar 6, 2006
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If you're at 50% workstation use, it may actually be worth considering AMD. Their new Ryzen CPUs offer more cores/threads for the money and are generally much better at workstation type loads than the equivalent priced Intel. They are a little slower at gaming (but should catch up as game engines are optimized, then pass Intel as more cores become important), I like this chart they made up at launch:



Since you're not interested in overclocking, I'd suggest a 1600x (near maxed out clockspeed) with a cheap tower cooler. $20 Cryorig M9a w/ AM4 bracket would be my pick, otherwise a $30 CM 212 Evo is the common choice (not bad, but a hair worse at everything than the M9).

Ah what the heck, I'll just throw together an AMD build list real quick:

PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/JjNxM8
Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/JjNxM8/by_merchant/

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600X 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($227.99 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - M9a 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($26.97 @ Newegg Marketplace)
Motherboard: ASRock - Fatal1ty X370 Gaming K4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($134.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 14-14-14-34 ($162.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital - Blue 500GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($149.94 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($83.44 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Asus - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB TURBO Video Card ($474.58 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit ($104.88 @ OutletPC)

Total: $1444.77
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-09 17:26 EDT-0400

1600x (vs 1600 or 7600k) for the most cores/threads and high stock clock speed

M9a is cheaper, cooler, and quieter than the common 212 EVO recommendation. Need to confirm (through newegg and/or cryorig) or request a free AM4 bracket after purchase. AM4 is a new socket and there's still a chance of old HS/F inventory without the new adapters/brackets.

X370 K4 looks to have decent VRM/heatsinks, and all the features (ALC 1220, Intel NIC, USB-C 10 Gbps, even an M.2 WiFi slot)

Cheapest name brand 3200MHz CAS 14 kit, which should be Samsung B-die and is considered the ideal RAM for AM4

M.2 is the new hotness, so I included one even though it's still SATA. The same drive in 2.5" is cheaper, but not as "bodacious". This WD Blue SSD is based on a Sandisk X400, one of the faster best all around budget drives. You could also consider a Samsung 850 EVO (also in M.2) for $35 more, it's easily the best "non-pro" SATA drive. If you want higher performance and bragging rights (without completely devastating the wallet) then you can consider a PCIE NVME SSD like the 960 EVO, or Plextor mp8e.

HDD is simply the lowest cost per GB, 7200 RPM unit, new, from WD or Seagate (Toshiba too, if they're much cheaper).

GTX 1080 seems like the obvious choice for this budget, this was the cheapest but is a blower. May be worth spending more for a quieter/cooler open air card.

Seasonic is the quick easy choice, and I went with a mid range, modular, gold rated unit at about twice your typical load wattage (for best efficiency with some room to grow)

Win 10 home 64 bit is the obvious choice, the USB version is very convenient and considered retail vs the OEM download.
 
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EliteRetard

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Oh and do you have another front intake fan for that case? If not, it's probably worth buying another (perhaps even identical) to help feed air into the system and keep positive pressure (reduces dust).
 
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Dashel

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Thanks Elite, I definitely appreciate the help. I'm going to stick with Intel but I'm going to look over your other components now. I'm kinda stuck on a video card and some other stuff. I see the M.2 SSD coming up... I'll have to do some reading on that. Looks like it's not much more expensive, but I don't understand the benefits.

Here is what I have so far, if anyone can make sure these are all compatible I'd appreciate it. I'll update as I go in case this helps anyone:

ASUS ROG STRIX Z270E GAMING LGA1151 DDR4 DP HDMI DVI M.2 ATX Motherboard with Onboard AC Wi-Fi and USB 3.1
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA24G57D8555

Intel Core i7-7700K Kaby Lake Quad-Core 4.2 GHz LGA 1151 91W BX80677I77700K Desktop Processor
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117726

Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 3000 (PC4-24000) C15 for DDR4 Systems, White LED (CMU16GX4M2C3000C15)
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HKF4ZUI/

SAMSUNG 850 EVO 2.5" 500GB SATA III 3-D Vertical Internal Solid State Drive (SSD) MZ-75E500B/AM
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIAB3U5P13660&cm_re=samsung_ssd-_-20-147-373-_-Product

Seagate BarraCuda STBD2000101 2TB 7200 RPM 64MB Cache SATA 6.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive Retail Packaging
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16822148910
 

EliteRetard

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Wow Asus...what a shitty way to do MOBOs. I had to do a comparison on their website to see what the hell was going on:
https://www.asus.com/Product-Compare/?products=ouGRuCxPqXbYglEa,dbHksGBreBRGHFBy,SehfRCaeB5kqhi9C&b=2

They're extremely similar boards, with very minor differences. I'm not sure it's worth $100 more for the E vs H, but F might be the sweet spot.

H - No Displayport for the IGP (E/F both have it, all have HDMI/DVI) - 3rd x16 slot is x2 elctrical (vs x4 on E/F) - Maybe no SRT (SSD cache for HDD, though this may be a typo, since it should be standard on Z270 and this does support optane SSD caching) - No PCB separation for audio, so perhaps a tiny amount worse EMI - No WiFi but 2x USB 2.0 moved to back panel (empty on F, WiFi on E) - No ROG Aura RGB lighting stuff - No type C, looks like 2x type A 10Gbps (vs 1x type C + 1x type A 10Gbps on E/F) - Looks like a few other minor differences in BIOS/software and onboard headers

F - Has the DP - 3rd x16 is x4 electrical - Has SRT etc - Has separated audio - No WiFi or extra USB 2.0 on back - Has RGB stuff - Has type C

E - Has everything H/F do, but trades the 2 USB 2.0 on the back of the H for WiFi, and adds a second USB 3.1 10Gbps controller internally.

At first it may seem like the H is missing a lot, but it's mostly useless. You wont be using the IGP so the missing DP shouldn't matter, and if you need the IGP in the future DVI and HDMI should be fine. The lower electrical connection on the bottom PCIE slot shouldn't matter much, unless you plan on using 3 AMD GPUs (Nvidia doesn't allow 3), or 2 GPUs and 3 x4 PCIE SSDs at the same time. The SRT/caching thing doesn't really matter, it's purpose is to use a small SSD to boost performance of a HDD as your primary drive. Obviously a straight SSD is far superior (and you have a 500GB SSD in the budget). Not sure how much difference there really is for the audio on the H, if it's even measurable...it uses the same high end parts, just different MOBO traces. The WiFi and USB 2 ports don't really matter, those can all be added for much cheaper. Does RGB matter to you? And while it's missing type C, it still has the same controller and 2x 3.1 10Gbps ports...so it should just be a matter of using an adapter on one or both ports. Type A is more common now anyway, so this isn't a big deal.

I'd say get the F if you want to have the RGB stuff and/or type C included on board...it's not hugely more expensive. However I don't see any reason to choose the E version, it's $80 more than the F for just wifi and 2 more 3.1 10GBps ports. You can buy the best Intel WiFi adapter for $30 if you need it, same with USB (but there's plenty of other headers on all these MOBOs already).
 
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EliteRetard

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Speaking of drives, why do you have a 2TB when you can get the same brand and warranty 3TB for the same $80 price?

As for M.2, it basically boils down to this: PCIE vs SATA.
M.2 primarily evolved for mobile, it takes up less space and doesn't require cables like a 2.5" or 3.5" drive.
M.2 can be SATA or PCIE (in x2 or x4 configuration) not all M.2 are PCIE or SATA, they can be both and either or as well

SATA is an older (but good) standard, and it's top speed is slower than the maximum x4 PCIE available through M.2. A good SATA SSD is still very fast for most people. There's no real advantage to a SATA M.2 port, it just allows you to put a physically small SSD on the MOBO instead of a 2.5" drive with cables. That may be useful for looks in some cases. One downside is that most M.2 drives don't have a good heatsink (2.5" drives can use their metal casing), and they may be in an area of poor airflow so they can overheat (especially under a GPU) and throttle speed to cool down.

The primary advantage (besides physical size for laptops) of the M.2 drives is the PCIE x4 option. Again, it's technically much faster than SATA, but for ordinary use and gaming it's not usually worth the extra cost. It wont give you higher frame rate or anything like that, it's mostly faster load and response times. For example, a HDD could boot a game in 30 seconds, a good SATA SSD (ex: 850 EVO) could do it in 10 seconds, and an x4 PCIE SSD (ex: 960 EVO) might be able to do it in 8.5 seconds. It is faster, but in this situation the difference is small enough it doesn't really matter.

However in more professional use, the difference may be larger and could be worthwhile. For example, a video render that takes 4 hours on a SATA SSD, on a PCIE x4 that's just 20% faster gets it done in 3.2 hours. If an hour of your time is worth $100, then you pretty much just made back the extra cost for that PCIE drive.
 
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EliteRetard

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Put together a new parts list as an Intel system, but had to make several small cuts and still came in a hair over budget.

PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/dFqWRG
Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/dFqWRG/by_merchant/

CPU: Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($308.89 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - M9i 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($18.99 @ Newegg Marketplace)
Motherboard: ASRock - Fatal1ty Z270 Gaming K4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($128.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($116.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital - Blue 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($149.74 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($83.44 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB G1 Gaming Video Card ($528.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($69.39 @ SuperBiiz)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit ($104.88 @ OutletPC)

Total: $1510.29
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-10 18:16 EDT-0400

i7 for the high stock clock speed (no OC) and extra threads vs i5

I still like the Cryorig M9 series for the best budget cooler, good enough for stock i7.

Your budget didn't fit those Asus MOBOs, this Asrock appears to have all the features of the Strix Z270 F/E for less.
http://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/Fatal1ty Z270 Gaming K4/index.us.asp

One of the cheapest name brand 16GB kits above 2666MHz, needed to shave dollars off the budget

Switched to the 2.5" WD Blue from M.2, again needed to shave dollars off budget (850 EVO was $20 more over budget)
Lowest cost per GB new name brand 7200 RPM HDD

Stepped up to the cheapest open air GPU vs the blower model before, a little harder on the budget.

Stepped down to 550w of the same PSU, still within the 50-65% idela efficiency range but shaved a few dollars off.

Same retail USB Win 10 Home 64bit
 
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Dashel

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Elite this is very helpful!!

Ok I had come up with this... and decided to go ahead and up the budget a bit so let me go over this now that I've seen your post. Here's what I had come up with on my own:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($308.89 @ B&H)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright - TRUE Spirit 140 POWER 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($52.90 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI - Z270 GAMING PRO CARBON ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($131.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($141.88 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($163.99 @ B&H)
Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($47.88 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Superclocked Gaming ACX 3.0 Video Card ($544.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Phanteks - Enthoo Pro ATX Full Tower Case (Purchased For $0.00)
Power Supply: Corsair - RMx 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($89.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1562.38
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-12 17:00 EDT-0400
 

Dashel

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So really my only questions are:

Motherboard: Ignoring overall budget what is a solid motherboard for under 200 bucks.
Wifi: If the motherboard doesn't have wifi what is a connection that can handle gaming. Under 100 bucks
RAM: Again ignoring overall budget what is a quality set that is 3000 or above, for under say $160 bucks.
 

VirtualLarry

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Wifi: If the motherboard doesn't have wifi what is a connection that can handle gaming. Under 100 bucks
Gigabit ethernet?
Seriously, don't game over wifi. If you do,use a media extender or bridge,connected to the ethernet on your PC.
 
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EliteRetard

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So really my only questions are:

Motherboard: Ignoring overall budget what is a solid motherboard for under 200 bucks.
Wifi: If the motherboard doesn't have wifi what is a connection that can handle gaming. Under 100 bucks
RAM: Again ignoring overall budget what is a quality set that is 3000 or above, for under say $160 bucks.
I think everyone can agree Asus is the #1 MOBO maker (I put ASRock and Gigabyte as #2). As described in my earlier post above, it looks like the Strix Z270 F at $150 is a good sweet spot. The E version was $80 more for just wifi and 2 extra USB 3.1 ports, but if you can get it well under $200 on a sale it might be worth it (looks like a less reliable Qualcom WiFi, consider it to be worth $25 max).

As VirtualLarry suggests, wired is always better than WiFi...but if you must have WiFi, it's hard to beat Intel for reliability. You definitely want external antenna, so you can place them where they get best reception (blocked behind the computer with its metal case and lots of EMI is the worst).

I can suggest something like the Gigabyte GC-WB867D-I version 4.3 (typically $40 but can be had for $30 on sale), it contains the "newest" (few years old now) Intel 8265 adapter (which supports MU-MIMO). Version 4.2 has the Intel 8260 (no MU-MIMO). Intel has recently announced the new 9260 adapter, but I don't see it available anywhere, and don't know when it will become available. There are others that offer these Intel adapters as well, but back when I looked for mine the Gigabyte version was the cheapest with external antenna. Also, definitely download the latest drivers directly from Intel, you'll get the best performance/reliability that way (no need to bother with Gigabyte or whoever else makes the card).

I actually own one of these Gigabyte v4.3 adapters, and while it took a little fiddling to find the best reception (it's hanging on a tack on the wall) it's doing quite well. I have no control over the modem/router here (I'm "renting") so I'm stuck with a shitty 2.4GHz only .11n Comcast modem/WiFi combo. The modem is upstairs in the opposite corner (60-70ft away, 3 sheetrock walls and 1 floor) and this Intel adapter can still pick up 144mbps and consistently holds the ~60mbps internet speed cap. Steam downloads at 7.3-7.7 MB/s. I had one of those Linksys .11n 150mbps USB adapters before (it was on an extension cable for best reception), and it could barely reach 30mbps (most often it was around 20mbps).

For RAM, you can stick with a big name brand (Corsair, G Skill, Kingston, Crucial) and get the highest speed, and lowest latency possible. Typically I consider 1 speed bin and 1 CAS to be about equal, preferring 1 speed bin to 1 CAS up to a certain point (for DDR4 that's about 3200MHz).
For example: 3000MHz 14-14-14-34 versus 3200MHz 15-15-15-35 Id take the 3200MHz.
If there were a 3400MHz option at 16-16-16-36, I'd probably still take the 3200MHz (many systems have a harder time running more than 3200MHz, and there's diminishing returns at higher speeds)
Careful though, some kits claim like 3200MHz CAS 15 but actually use something like 15-17-17-37. 3000MHz 14-14-14-34 would be better, or 3400MHz even at 17-17-17-37.

Doing a quick look right now, the fastest near your budget is a 3200MHz CAS 14-14-14-34 kit at $170
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/9rDzK8/gskill-memory-f43200c14d16gvr

The best cheap option looks like 3200MHz CAS 16-16-16-36 at just $115
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/T9Gj4D/gskill-memory-f43200c16d16gvk

There's tons of other options too, with some between those at like 15-16-16-35, but those don't seem to be enough better to be worth the extra money. If you want to step up from the $115 option, you'll want to find a 3200MHz kit with actual 15-15-15-35 timings under say $150 (that puts it right in the middles price and CAS). I didn't feel like spending a lot of time looking :D
 
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EliteRetard

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Mar 6, 2006
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Elite this is very helpful!!

Ok I had come up with this... and decided to go ahead and up the budget a bit so let me go over this now that I've seen your post. Here's what I had come up with on my own:
CPU: Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($308.89 @ B&H)
CPU Cooler: Thermalright - TRUE Spirit 140 POWER 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler ($52.90 @ Amazon)

If you're not overclocking this cooler is a bit overkill. As I've mentioned a few times, I think the M9 series can handle a stock 7700k for cheap. If you want something in between, the Cryorig H7 Universal is a good choice at $35, bigger and better than the M9 (probably not as good as this True 140). Going overkill isn't bad, and it does offer more overclocking headroom in the future if you decide you want it...but something like the H7 can still handle some OC and saves you a few dollars.

Motherboard: MSI - Z270 GAMING PRO CARBON ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($131.98 @ Newegg)

If you want the top brand, Asus ROG Strix Z270 F for $150 might be the best bang for buck under $200.

Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($141.88 @ OutletPC)

This particular kit has high latency (16-18-18-38) and looks like a much worse deal than the 3200MHz 16-16-16-36 at $115 I linked above.

Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($163.99 @ B&H)
Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($47.88 @ OutletPC)

Still not a good price per GB, but I guess it's "cheap".

Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Superclocked Gaming ACX 3.0 Video Card ($544.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Phanteks - Enthoo Pro ATX Full Tower Case (Purchased For $0.00)
Power Supply: Corsair - RMx 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)

For the same $80 I'd personally take one of the 650 gold Seasonic units:
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/R7V48d/seasonic-power-supply-ssr650rm
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/WrNypg/seasonic-focus-plus-gold-650w-80-gold-certified-fully-modular-atx-power-supply-ssr-650fx

Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($89.89 @ OutletPC)

Just pointing out that an OEM copy you need to download and make your own disk/USB...and it's tied to the first system you install it on. The retail version that comes on a USB stick can officially be moved from one system to another (obviously only 1 system at a time).
 
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EliteRetard

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So if I modify my previous build list:

PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/cQpktJ
Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/cQpktJ/by_merchant/

CPU: Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($308.89 @ B&H)
CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($29.90 @ Newegg Marketplace)
Motherboard: Asus - STRIX Z270F ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($151.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 16-16-16-36 ($114.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($163.99 @ B&H)
Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($39.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: PNY - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB XLR8 Video Card ($549.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit ($104.88 @ OutletPC)

Total: $1544.60
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-13 14:20 EDT-0400

Seems even the high end GPU market is going nuts (dang miners! *shakes fist*), makes it hard to pick since every day the stock and prices change.
 
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EliteRetard

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Hey, if you want dirt cheap and don't mind refurb there's a 3TB enterprise HDD for $45 (discount code on page):
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=1Z4-001J-00224&Tpk=1Z4-001J-00224

I normally wouldn't suggest refurb, but being an enterprise drive it may be just as good as a new consumer class.
I wouldn't use it for critical data (unless multiple frequent backups) but for games and stuff who cares...
 
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LostPassword

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i bought 2 of those 3tb hdd when they were on sale from newegg. so far so good. but they are slightly like green drives in that if you don't access them for a while, it takes a second to load up, usually my mp3 playlist. (my main hdd is a m.2 drive and have most my programs on that).
edit: i should change my signature.
 

EliteRetard

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i bought 2 of those 3tb hdd when they were on sale from newegg. so far so good. but they are slightly like green drives in that if you don't access them for a while, it takes a second to load up, usually my mp3 playlist. (my main hdd is a m.2 drive and have most my programs on that).
edit: i should change my signature.
That could simply be a windows power saving setting, which turns off or puts the HDD to sleep. I always set all HDDs to always active (and usually running 24/7), by the time they wear out they're useless anyway. I've got 6 old HDDs sitting right here next to me that still work...from an 80GB IDE up to 2x 1TB SATA, all still working but to small to be useful (to me anyway, I'll probably give away the 1TBs, maybe the 500GB too).

The 80GB has been through a few systems since the 90's, it's the oldest I've kept around. I've still got an Athlon XP Barton 2500+ system, and a C2D E6600 (first one, not pentium, 2.4GHz 4MB) with small HDDs still running (thinking about that, I could probably upgrade those HDDs with one of these larger ones laying around). There's also an AMD 64 FX-55 (I remember I got a stupid good deal on it for $200, but then C2D happened) system but it's not currently running.

I think I've personally only ever had 2 HDDs go bad. The first might have been a 20GB (don't remember exactly), I do recall partitioning the drive to avoid the bad sectors and used it until I think the 80GB. There's also a 1TB that started acting weird, but it was a data drive so I just pulled and replaced it (never bothered to check it)...but it's still here in the other (junk) pile, along with 5 pin DIN connectors, 256MB memory cards/sticks, floppy drives (5 1/4 too), CD caddies, modems, old heatsinks, tons of cables, etc.
 

LostPassword

Member
Dec 2, 2007
197
1
81
thats a good point. i didn't realize power saving mode. i also have a few less than 1tb drives lying around. mostly laptop drives that i pulled when i upgrade the laptops to ssds. i usually install the pulled drives to friends and families older pc's as storage drives for them.
 

Dashel

Senior member
Nov 5, 2003
226
0
71
Thanks for all the help here folks. I really do appreciate it!

Here is what I ended up with:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($323.89 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus - STRIX Z270-E GAMING ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($199.00 @ B&H)
Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($141.88 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($177.95 @ Newegg)
Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB DUKE OC Video Card (Purchased For $504.00)
Case: Phanteks - Enthoo Pro ATX Full Tower Case ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($74.88 @ OutletPC)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit ($102.89 @ OutletPC)
Total: $1649.37
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-23 12:13 EDT-0400



Prices have fluctuated a bit. I think my final cost was around 1585.00.

Some notes:
Motherboard: The Strix E was only because I need Wifi/bluetooth temporarily until I run the ethernet down to my first floor (from the 3rd). If you don't need that then this is overkill.

Video Card: This was simply an opportunity purchase. Card prices are absurd right now. 504 bucks for a 1080 was a great deal believe it or not, and it sold out within minutes of me buying one. 1070's are going for 500 bucks and 1080's for 600 and up for the better ones. So this guy just popped up as available and not obscenely priced so I snatched it up.

I have not put it together yet, still waiting on the card which should be here by Wednesday. Will update later :)

Thanks again!!

Rich
 

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