Help for network newbie

TeABaG88

Member
Apr 22, 2001
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Hello all,
I don't have a whole lot of experience in networking computers and have a fairly easy question. I have run Cat 5e wire to the majority of rooms in my home and now need to hook these up in my basement to a network. What equipment do I need for this? Also, I have a wireless laptop that I want to hook up to the network so I know I will need a wireless router as well. My main question is just how everything hooks up. Do all I run all my hard wired connections into a hub/switch (not sure the difference) which my wireless router would also connect to? Any particular router and hub/switches which you would recommend. I have about 10 wired connections to be connected but would like to leave a little room open for expansion in the future as well. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 

bwatson283

Golden Member
Jul 16, 2006
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ISP Modem-->Router----> Switch-----> all the computers

Use a switch, hubs are things of the past. :)
A switch is a smart Hub, a packet coming in to the network and wanting to reach computer A, The hub will broadcast and ask for a reply from all computers. A switch has that info stored so the file goes to the direct path instead of causing a ton of traffic on the network with a hub.


The Belkin, Linksys, dlink are fine to use.
 

TeABaG88

Member
Apr 22, 2001
79
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Thanks guys, answered my question perfectly.

One other question. What is the easiest way to connect the wired connections into the switch? Right now I just have the cable runs with no connectors on the end of them. Should I buy the connectors and crimp them on myself? I have never done this before so I don't know how easy it would be. Or would it be better to buy a patch panel, and put the connections into that and then connect from the patch panel to the switch? Thanks.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
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If you are not an experience crimper do not crimp.

In the Rooms at the end of the run put plates with Keystone and terminate the cables into the keystones.
http://www.ezlan.net/CAT.html

From the Keystone to the network device use commercial patches.

Patch panel in the center would give you much better flexibility and ease of use.

 

TeABaG88

Member
Apr 22, 2001
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Thanks Jack. I do already have those jacks installed in the rooms at that end. I was actually referring to my storage room where I have all the runs going to. Currently, they have no ends and are just the bare cables. Sounds like I will go with a patch panel there to make everything easier.
 

TeABaG88

Member
Apr 22, 2001
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OK, I lied :) I do have one more question.

What is the differnece between and unmanaged and managed switch (it looks as though these as also referred to as unmanaged and smart switches). I am looking at the 16 or 24 Gigabit switches but don't know if I will need to go with the "Unmanaged" or "Smart" switch. Thanks.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
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The term managed switches often comes up on Network forums, and it is Not familiar to most End-users (the flowing is a very basic primer; ?plumbers? do not get upset ;) ).

A regular switch is a static device (No configuration interface exists); Network devices are plugged into it, and receive the Network communication that is directed toward then as is.

A managed switch is a switch with interface that allows communication and configuration of the switch functions.

Features that can be controlled vary between manufacturers and models, the most basic have the ability to turn the Ports on or off, control individual port speed, and duplex settings.

Security control that prevents plugging unauthorized devices to the LAN. Controls to allow a particular MAC addresses to connect, and an option to set login authentication.

Capacity to designate certain ports as "high priority", like the ports that the Network Server is plugged into.

VLANS (Virtual LANS) . Let you set a broadcast domain on certain ports, so that broadcast traffic isn't passed on to the other ports. This can isolate segments of the network from each other for security purposes.

Link aggregation. Combine together multiple ports, to create higher throughput than what one single port can deliver.

Note: Managed switches are x10 and more expensive than regular switches.

Not all of their features can be used in a regular home network using Client OS.
 

TeABaG88

Member
Apr 22, 2001
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Jack,
Thanks for the info!
A while back, I purchased these jacks for a couple of the rooms in my house. Link - http://www.home-technology-sto...atedetail.aspx?ID=1473
The website says that they are Cat5, but does not mention Cat 5e. Are these jacks Cat5e compatible? If they aren't and I use these jacks will I thus reduce those connections to standard Cat 5? I don't know if the jacks matter as far as Cat 5 vs. Cat 5e. Thanks again.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
29,471
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They are probably OK. The main difference in Cat5 vs. Cat5e is the actual cable pair twisting inside the cable.

Keystone are sold in Home Depot too (Leviton) you can buy one and compare.

When you install the keystone leave some spare so if needed you can cut the end and install a new jack.