Have you read the Wired article on Matrix Reloaded yet?

Megatomic

Lifer
Nov 9, 2000
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I am truly blown away. I just read the print edition of Wired and the article on the cinematography used to create Matrix Reloaded has just blown me away. You can read the online version of the article

HERE!!

The way ESC uses computers and digital media is staggering to my mind. From the article:
To replace the faces of Yuen's men with that of Agent Smith - while retaining the level of photorealism that the Wachowskis demanded - Gaeta and his team built a system for sampling the real at a higher resolution than had ever before been attempted, dubbing this process universal capture.

Gaeta began by making lo-res laser scans of Reeves' and Weaving's heads in relaxed, neutral poses. These scans furnished the basic geometry upon which succeeding layers of real-world data would be applied.

Then Reeves and Weaving each sat down on a stage in front of five Sony HDW-900 video cameras. The massive datastreams from these cameras - one gigabyte a second - were treated like holy water; even the cameras' color-correction software was disabled to prevent any loss of data. Instead of recording to tape, which requires compression, the cameras were modified to send uncompressed data to a bank of high-end PCs that stored it on a huge disk array. "The scene in that room was surreal," Gaeta recalls. "There's this guy onstage, and his face is surrounded with this f*cking Cape Canaa-averal backup system."

As Reeves and Weaving acted out a range of facial expressions for their rumble in the courtyard, the cameras captured each twitch of muscle and every change in the blood flow to the skin. This data was then analyzed with algorithms written by Borshukov that tracked each individual pixel as it moved from frame to frame. The tiny irregularities in the actors' faces actually made this job easier, giving Borshukov's algorithms distinctive points in space to grab on to as he reconstructed the actors' features moving through time.

I am so excited about this movie, I can hardly wait for May 15th to get here.
 

Megatomic

Lifer
Nov 9, 2000
20,128
6
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Originally posted by: 0roo0roo
yes, theres also a article on doom3:)
I have read that article as well, it just didn't strike the same chord with me. That's not to say that I am not anticipating Doom III's arrival though. :)
 

Occifer

Golden Member
Mar 27, 2002
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Then Reeves and Weaving each sat down on a stage in front of five Sony HDW-900 video cameras. The massive datastreams from these cameras - one gigabyte a second - were treated like holy water

:Q
 

chizow

Diamond Member
Jun 26, 2001
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The games look schweeet too. Gonna be tough deciding whether to get it for the XBox or the PC....I'll guess I'll have to wait for the reviews.

Chiz
 

DOOPYLOOPY

Senior member
Aug 11, 2000
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well holy crap after seeing the trailer it looks absolutely amazing

Can't wait for the DVD and to hear the Gaeta man himself.
 

Megatomic

Lifer
Nov 9, 2000
20,128
6
81
Originally posted by: DOOPYLOOPY
well holy crap after seeing the trailer it looks absolutely amazing

Can't wait for the DVD and to hear the Gaeta man himself.
I can't wait for the movie myself! And I wonder how long it will take for the DVD to get to market after the movie hits the theaters?
 

ShowdOWN

Golden Member
Sep 25, 2002
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i havent had time to read all my wired magazines in months, they are still in the plastic wrapping.

im sure to open them up tonite.
 

0roo0roo

No Lifer
Sep 21, 2002
64,862
84
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Originally posted by: SeekingTao
Originally posted by: 0roo0roo
yes, theres also a article on doom3:)
I have read that article as well, it just didn't strike the same chord with me. That's not to say that I am not anticipating Doom III's arrival though. :)

yea, it was a minor article, but more relavent to a tech forum:)


it was stuck way way in the back hehe, short little article.


the reloaded stuff was the main thing:)
 
Jun 18, 2000
11,122
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Originally posted by: 0roo0roo
yes, theres also a article on doom3:)
Link?

Edit: Nevermind. From here:
Prepare to Meet Thy Doom [Coming Apr. 16]
John Carmack's game engines set the standard for PC graphics - and legions of gamers and the industry love him for it. Now he's brought the world to the brink of Doom III.
By David Kushner
 

Megatomic

Lifer
Nov 9, 2000
20,128
6
81
Originally posted by: 0roo0roo

yea, it was a minor article, but more relavent to a tech forum:)

The massive datastreams from these cameras - one gigabyte a second - were treated like holy water; even the cameras' color-correction software was disabled to prevent any loss of data. Instead of recording to tape, which requires compression, the cameras were modified to send uncompressed data to a bank of high-end PCs that stored it on a huge disk array.
I don't know, I find that comment VERY relevant to a tech forum. :) Basically, though I am a gamer at heart, I do think there are better uses for computers and I stumbled onto one of them when I read this article.
 

bgeh

Platinum Member
Nov 16, 2001
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1 gigabyte per second....hmm that makes me wonder......are they using the 10GB/s ethernet standard and what hard drives are they using to keep that and what hd can take 1gb/s?
maybe RAM drives? or maybe some raid 0 array with 16 scsi hds?:D
questions, questions
 

MikeMike

Lifer
Feb 6, 2000
45,885
66
91
Originally posted by: bgeh
1 gigabyte per second....hmm that makes me wonder......are they using the 10GB/s ethernet standard and what hard drives are they using to keep that and what hd can take 1gb/s?
maybe RAM drives? or maybe some raid 0 array with 16 scsi hds?:D
questions, questions

most likely, it was a straight fiber line to the computer, and some amazing sort of storage. Most likely ram drives running straight off of a backup generator
 

chizow

Diamond Member
Jun 26, 2001
9,537
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Originally posted by: DOOPYLOOPY
solid state array?
Nah, the article says:
Instead of recording to tape, which requires compression, the cameras were modified to send uncompressed data to a bank of high-end PCs that stored it on a huge disk array
A solid-state form of storage would simply be too expensive and impractical for storing 1 GB/s streams. I'd guess its using a massive SCSI RAID or even IDE RAID 0/5 array with a whole lotta drives.

Chiz
 

sharkeeper

Lifer
Jan 13, 2001
10,886
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We have over 45,000 TB's of streams on Chaparral RAID here that would laugh at 1GB/S so it's out there. I'm kind of surprise that they're using PC's though. Granted, they're not emachines or dells but still...

-DAK-
 

Megatomic

Lifer
Nov 9, 2000
20,128
6
81
Originally posted by: shuttleteam
We have over 45,000 TB's of streams on Chaparral RAID here that would laugh at 1GB/S so it's out there. I'm kind of surprise that they're using PC's though. Granted, they're not emachines or dells but still...

-DAK-
What is the application (if you are allowed to tell)? For the video work described in the article, is 1GB/sec/camera not a lot of data? I am not well versed in this area of computing which might explain why I was so impressed by it all. :D
 

sharkeeper

Lifer
Jan 13, 2001
10,886
2
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When one is monitoring every particular component of pretty much the most complicated machine on the planet and taking tens of thousands of samples per second per sensor, the data rate gets astronomical. (pun not intended!)

1GB per camera is pretty high. Of course it depends on resolution and the frame capture rate. If one wishes to capture the motion of a plasma jet at 45,000 FPS with 14 megapixels of 32bit colour, you need a fat pipe your storage place. :Q Of course when viewed at 60 FPS, the slow motion is very detailed and the eye can catch anomalies that would never be visible otherwise.

-DAK-