Have the desktop / laptop sockets for Intel reunited?

TruePaige

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2006
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#1
I remember some golden days of P4-Mobile overclocking in desktops.

I see a lot of Core i3/i5/i7 laptops now, and am wondering if they are rnning LGA 1156 just like the desktops?

Can I use a mobile processor in the desktop again? :D
 

Ben90

Platinum Member
Jun 14, 2009
2,866
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#2
MAAAAYYYYBE with some ridiculous adapter, but no they use different sockets. I highly doubt the mobile and desktop sockets will ever be the same again as the whole point of the new mobile sockets is to cut down space. I'm probably wrong because I'm too lazy to check this, but arnt the mobile CPUs soldered to the mobo now?
 
Mar 27, 2009
12,759
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#3
I remember some golden days of P4-Mobile overclocking in desktops.

I see a lot of Core i3/i5/i7 laptops now, and am wondering if they are rnning LGA 1156 just like the desktops?

Can I use a mobile processor in the desktop again? :D
http://www.anandtech.com/show/3824/asrock-core-100htbd-bringing-htpcs-to-the-mainstream-market

About the closest we are getting is laptop cpu/chipset in mini-itx format. But this is much different than running Arrandale in a LGA1156 socket.
 
Mar 27, 2009
12,759
19
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#4
I'm probably wrong because I'm too lazy to check this, but arnt the mobile CPUs soldered to the mobo now?
I recently found out some of the mobile cpus can be replaced.
 

TruePaige

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2006
9,879
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#5
I recently found out some of the mobile cpus can be replaced.
Yea, this you can usually figure out by model number. You can check the package of a chip on Intel's site. BGA is soldered on. PGA is socketed. I've been doing a lot of laptop repair lately and have been getting back in the knowledge base for this kind of stuff. Dell almost always uses socketed processors, Macbooks never do. Core 2 Vaio's I've worked on so far are socketed as well. HP DV6000 and DV9000 models were socketed as well.

I was confused by the new Core i# sockets for a minute there though..doh.

I still don't quite understand why Intel made a seperate socket for their high end processors, seems like a bit of a money grab as it makes you decide whether to cut out upgrade potential right at the start and forces you into starting over when you do want to upgrade.

On topic, I remember a few, expensive, Socket P desktop boards I think though..

I hate getting confused. :X
 
Oct 14, 2003
5,753
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#6
I still don't quite understand why Intel made a seperate socket for their high end processors, seems like a bit of a money grab as it makes you decide whether to cut out upgrade potential right at the start and forces you into starting over when you do want to upgrade.
Are you talking about S1156 vs. S1366? Well, for the high end, using the same socket for both high-end PC and low end workstation processors allows it to share development costs and the volume is higher on the PC market.

Before it was S478 on the PC and S603 for the Xeon, then it was LGA775 and LGA771. You still have same amount of sockets, there's just one more on the PC side. Without it they might have done something similar like S423 and S478 anyway.
 

TruePaige

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2006
9,879
0
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#7
Are you talking about S1156 vs. S1366? Well, for the high end, using the same socket for both high-end PC and low end workstation processors allows it to share development costs and the volume is higher on the PC market.

Before it was S478 on the PC and S603 for the Xeon, then it was LGA775 and LGA771. You still have same amount of sockets, there's just one more on the PC side. Without it they might have done something similar like S423 and S478 anyway.
Oh..sounds better when you put it like that. :D
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
17,095
34
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#8
S478 had a rediculously long life span on the laptop side
 


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