Hard wood choices.

Sep 29, 2004
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Any wood geeks here?

I'll keep this short. I want to do an around the room (near the ceiling) setup for a G gauge train (a large engine is 7" high and 2' long). Anyways, I want to do all the woodwork on my own. Yes, I am capable.

I was planning on Red Oak. I think it is affordable but I was wondering if anyone here more knowledgeable than I knows of some nice looking hard woods that cost less than red oak. The only real requirement is that it needs to be a darker wood than pine which provides a wide array of options.

Thanks!

 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
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You could make the wood as dark as you want by staining it... I like maple or birch, they don't have heavy grain like oak does.
 
Sep 29, 2004
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Originally posted by: mugs
You could make the wood as dark as you want by staining it... I like maple or birch, they don't have heavy grain like oak does.

I need to keep it in its natural state (I might not even use polyurethane) in case of any repairs that are needed down the road. Long story short, the installation will be there for well over 50 years. Anyways, I want to avoid staining.
 
Nov 5, 2001
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Originally posted by: IHateMyJob2004
Originally posted by: mugs
You could make the wood as dark as you want by staining it... I like maple or birch, they don't have heavy grain like oak does.

I need to keep it in its natural state (I might not even use polyurethane) in case of any repairs that are needed down the road. Long story short, the installation will be there for well over 50 years. Anyways, I want to avoid staining.

actually it would be easier to match in several years if you do finish it. unfinished wood would oxidize and change colors over time.
 
Sep 29, 2004
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Originally posted by: MikeyIs4Dcats
Originally posted by: IHateMyJob2004
Originally posted by: mugs
You could make the wood as dark as you want by staining it... I like maple or birch, they don't have heavy grain like oak does.

I need to keep it in its natural state (I might not even use polyurethane) in case of any repairs that are needed down the road. Long story short, the installation will be there for well over 50 years. Anyways, I want to avoid staining.

actually it would be easier to match in several years if you do finish it. unfinished wood would oxidize and change colors over time.

I guess I'm only worried about staining. I'd hat to stain it all then 20 years later need to do repair work and forget what color stain I need.

So, staining is out. The current plan is to use a clear polyurethane though.

Any thoughts on a less expensive dark colored hard wood?
 
Nov 5, 2001
18,367
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Originally posted by: IHateMyJob2004
Originally posted by: MikeyIs4Dcats
Originally posted by: IHateMyJob2004
Originally posted by: mugs
You could make the wood as dark as you want by staining it... I like maple or birch, they don't have heavy grain like oak does.

I need to keep it in its natural state (I might not even use polyurethane) in case of any repairs that are needed down the road. Long story short, the installation will be there for well over 50 years. Anyways, I want to avoid staining.

actually it would be easier to match in several years if you do finish it. unfinished wood would oxidize and change colors over time.

I guess I'm only worried about staining. I'd hat to stain it all then 20 years later need to do repair work and forget what color stain I need.

So, staining is out. The current plan is to use a clear polyurethane though.

Any thoughts on a less expensive dark colored hard wood?

nope. pretty much everything darker than red oak is more expensive.
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,924
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Originally posted by: IHateMyJob2004
Any thoughts on a less expensive dark colored hard wood?

Are you using solid hardwood or hardwood plywood with something to cover the exposed edge? Hardwood plywood is a lot cheaper.
 
Sep 29, 2004
18,665
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Originally posted by: mugs
Originally posted by: IHateMyJob2004
Any thoughts on a less expensive dark colored hard wood?

Are you using solid hardwood or hardwood plywood with something to cover the exposed edge? Hardwood plywood is a lot cheaper.

I was planning on just using hardwood. How much could I save if I go with a hardwood plywood in terms of a percentage? Two sheets of 8x4 might be enough to do the whole room. I'd still use hardwood to make the support brackets but that isn't much of a cost compared to the wood needed for the track supports that g around the room.

How well would red oak glue to the edge of the plywood? Woould glue be sufficient or would I need to do that with finish nails?

EDIT: thanks for the responses. I'll be back tomorrow. It's getting very late.
 
Nov 5, 2001
18,367
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Originally posted by: IHateMyJob2004
Originally posted by: mugs
Originally posted by: IHateMyJob2004
Any thoughts on a less expensive dark colored hard wood?

Are you using solid hardwood or hardwood plywood with something to cover the exposed edge? Hardwood plywood is a lot cheaper.

I was planning on just using hardwood. How much could I save if I go with a hardwood plywood in terms of a percentage? Two sheets of 8x4 might be enough to do the whole room. I'd still use hardwood to make the support brackets but that isn't much of a cost compared to the wood needed for the track supports that g around the room.

How well would red oak glue to the edge of the plywood? Woould glue be sufficient or would I need to do that with finish nails?

you would want to use a veneer edging such as this:

http://www.vandykes.com/product/02012479/

 

Eeezee

Diamond Member
Jul 23, 2005
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Originally posted by: dennilfloss
Survey says: in a choice between hard wood and soft wood, most women preferred hard wood.

FINALLY, I was waiting for SOMEONE to make a response like this.

The rest of you should be ashamed!
 

SampSon

Diamond Member
Jan 3, 2006
7,160
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I can't believe you're trying to sound 'in' by using some radom nonsensical terms like 'G guage train'.
If you said that to any number of contractors or wood workers I deal with, they would look at you funny.

So you want to know what the best wood is for crown molding?

Capable? You sound silly man.
 

mugs

Lifer
Apr 29, 2003
48,924
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Originally posted by: SampSon
I can't believe you're trying to sound 'in' by using some radom nonsensical terms like 'G guage train'.
If you said that to any number of contractors or wood workers I deal with, they would look at you funny.

So you want to know what the best wood is for crown molding?

Capable? You sound silly man.

WTF... no, he wants to build a platform for a model train.

All aboard
 

bctbct

Diamond Member
Dec 22, 2005
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You guys are all fucked up

He wants to build a shelf toward the ceiling around the room :)
 

everman

Lifer
Nov 5, 2002
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Originally posted by: Eeezee
Originally posted by: dennilfloss
Survey says: in a choice between hard wood and soft wood, most women preferred hard wood.

FINALLY, I was waiting for SOMEONE to make a response like this.

The rest of you should be ashamed!

I was getting worried, ATOT you're loosing your edge. This should have been the first post!
 

SampSon

Diamond Member
Jan 3, 2006
7,160
1
0
Originally posted by: mugs
Originally posted by: SampSon
I can't believe you're trying to sound 'in' by using some radom nonsensical terms like 'G guage train'.
If you said that to any number of contractors or wood workers I deal with, they would look at you funny.

So you want to know what the best wood is for crown molding?

Capable? You sound silly man.

WTF... no, he wants to build a platform for a model train.

All aboard
Honestly, I thought at first that is what he meant. I had to weigh my options and gamble on it. I am going to say that I totally lost on this one.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
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Red Oak plywood will be the cheapest dark wood you can use. You can also edge band it with oak screen mold, stick it on with glue and pin nails. If you really want a repairable finish, use natural danish oil.
Do yourself a favor and get a pocket screw jig, you'll find yourself using it every time you build something. Pocket screws are the greatest invention since the table saw.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=11469
 

Pacfanweb

Lifer
Jan 2, 2000
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Just a side note: You say a train engine of this type is 7" high by 2" long? Are you sure? It's 7" tall but only 2" long? Sounds backwards, but I'm open to correction.
 
Dec 27, 2001
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Originally posted by: Greenman
Red Oak plywood will be the cheapest dark wood you can use. You can also edge band it with oak screen mold, stick it on with glue and pin nails. If you really want a repairable finish, use natural danish oil.
Do yourself a favor and get a pocket screw jig, you'll find yourself using it every time you build something. Pocket screws are the greatest invention since the table saw.

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=11469

I just built a desk for my office using mostly pocket holes and some biscuits. Pocket holes are great, but there is some slight torque unless you really clamp the hell out of your project.
 

jagec

Lifer
Apr 30, 2004
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Originally posted by: Pacfanweb
Just a side note: You say a train engine of this type is 7" high by 2" long? Are you sure? It's 7" tall but only 2" long? Sounds backwards, but I'm open to correction.

7 inches, 2 feet.


7" 2'.
 

BuckNaked

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
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I installed a hickory hardwood floor in a room once, and thought it was a beautiful wood, and very easy to work with. The guy who paid for the wood bought it because of the low cost compared to other woods, but I don't know what the cost might be in relation to something else you might be looking at.