Gym creates its own electricity from exercise bikes.

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Lifer
Jan 7, 2002
12,755
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Bikes8.jpg




The Greenasium really wants to be green. To do it, the new gym in San Diego is turning its customers into real gym rats.
The Greenasium , which opened Wednesday, has three specialty spin bikes that push electricity back into the grid, helping provide power to the gym and other electricity customers. Its the first human-powered fitness studio in San Diego, according to its owners.
"The bike's are retrofitted by a company up in Seattle that we work with called Resource Fitness," said Greenasium's co-owner Byron Spratt. "As the bike (spins), the wheel creates DC power, converts it to AC power, which is plugged back into the wall, which puts energy back into the grid."
Spratt expects to add elliptical bikes in October to help offset their carbon footprint to an even greater extent.


The 2,600-square-foot gym isn't completely human powered, at least not yet, Spratt said. Their goal is to be balanced, producing enough energy to offset what they consume.
Every three months, management will look at the gym's power-consumption totals, and then the gym will sponsor activities such as a beach cleanup to offset any additional carbon footprint.
The gym's green in other ways, too. Its rubber flooring is made of recycled tires, and the equipment has been refurbished to a near-new state. Other environmentally friendly elements include low-flow showers, dual flush toilets, filtered tap water and a no- to low-plastics policy -- there's no bottled water at the Greenasium

http://www.nbcsandiego.com/news/green/Gym-Takes-Powerful-Stance-102104054.html
 

jiggahertz

Golden Member
Apr 7, 2005
1,532
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I've always thought about this. If you could harness the power generated from plate loaded machines somehow as well. I figure more gyms don't do this because the amount of energy you could generate from these machines is probably pretty low compared to the required initial cost. This gym sounds like they're catering to the hippies instead of realizing any actual cost savings.
 

Train

Lifer
Jun 22, 2000
13,861
68
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www.bing.com
I always wondered why gyms werent doing this sooner.

There's a Gigantic gym near me, if you drive past it you can literally see hundreds of people churning away on bikes and elipticals. I imagine the gym could easily power itself during these peak times.
 

joesmoke

Diamond Member
Nov 2, 2007
5,423
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people being forced to generate power for giant corporations... Obama's communist regime is now coming to fruition

:p
 

Paperdoc

Platinum Member
Aug 17, 2006
2,298
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They appear smart enough NOT to show their pedaling customers how much electricity they are feeding back into the grid. I've seen and used demo machines for that purpose. You pedal like mad and try to keep a plain common 100 Watt light bulb lit to proper brightness. Turns out you gotta pedal hard! and it is difficult to keep up the pace for very long. VERY discouraging if you are trying to encourage continued work on the bike!
 

Eli

Super Moderator | Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
50,422
8
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I've thought about doing this in the basement. The fiancee keeps nagging me to get an exercise bike. I'm like, "Fine.. I'll get a bike. But I'm putting a generator on it, and you can use it to run the TV downstairs."

:D
 

highland145

Lifer
Oct 12, 2009
43,315
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Not much of a story right now because they only have 3. How hard is it to hook up a generator to the bike? Not very. Maybe the cost is too high.
 

Terzo

Platinum Member
Dec 13, 2005
2,589
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Anyone else thinking that a rowing machine would generate more power?
 

Eli

Super Moderator | Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
50,422
8
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Not much of a story right now because they only have 3. How hard is it to hook up a generator to the bike? Not very. Maybe the cost is too high.

For a high efficiency permanent magnet generator and the grid-tie inverter, it would be pretty expensive.

I could rig something up in about a half an hour for like $50 tho.

I already have a 30V Ametek PM motor that was/is for a wind generator project that never came to be, would be perfect for a bike though.. and you could generate some decent power.

20.0Voc and 5.7Isc @ 600RPM.
 
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highland145

Lifer
Oct 12, 2009
43,315
5,741
136
I want one for the home.
There was some 70's movie about power shortages until some guy figured out how to tap energy while people were having sex.

The scene: Kids watching T.V. and it starts to brown out. "Ma! Dad!"
 

highland145

Lifer
Oct 12, 2009
43,315
5,741
136
For a high efficiency permanent magnet generator and the grid-tie inverter, it would be pretty expensive.

I could rig something up in about a half an hour for like $50 tho.

I already have a 30V Ametek PM motor that was/is for a wind generator project that never came to be, would be perfect for a bike though.. and you could generate some decent power.
Whip one out and make some $$. When the kids get home from school put 'em on the bike to earn their keep.
 

Newbian

Lifer
Aug 24, 2008
24,778
840
126
Now all they need are wind turbines to catch all the huffing and puffing.
 

DrPizza

Administrator Elite Member Goat Whisperer
Mar 5, 2001
49,606
166
111
www.slatebrookfarm.com
Whip one out and make some $$. When the kids get home from school put 'em on the bike to earn their keep.

$50 cost.

Let's say it has about 50% efficiency, and that electricity costs $0.13 per kw-hr. Not too difficult to have someone run up a few flights of stairs, time them, and get a rough approximation of their power output. I've seen several bigger guys achieve slightly more than 1kw, but only for very short durations. According to some chart I found googling, if I average 20mph on a bike (which I used to easily be able to maintain for well over 20 miles on relatively level, smooth roads), I burn 38 calories per mile. That's 760 calories in an hour. I assume they mean kilocalories, as in food calories. That converts to 3179840 joules per hour. Or, dividing by 3600, errr, uhhh, that's 883 watts, which clearly shows that nutritionists are full of shit when they talk about how many calories you burn while exercising. So, let's say it's 400 watts. And, you're able to convert even 1/3 of them to electricity. 133 watts. That's 7.5 hours of biking to produce one kilowatt-hour.

So, you'd have to ride a bike a little shy of 3000 hours before you broke even on the $50 investment. If you go by the user's experience above where it was difficult to keep a 100 watt lightbulb lit - I'm assuming someone in average shape, you're looking at closer to 4000 hours to break even.3 179 840 joules
 

Fritzo

Lifer
Jan 3, 2001
41,884
2,124
126
I've always thought about this. If you could harness the power generated from plate loaded machines somehow as well. I figure more gyms don't do this because the amount of energy you could generate from these machines is probably pretty low compared to the required initial cost. This gym sounds like they're catering to the hippies instead of realizing any actual cost savings.

I always wondered why they didn't have prisoners do this as a job, instead of stupid "pick up trash" crap.
 

GoSharks

Diamond Member
Nov 29, 1999
3,057
0
76
Let's say it has about 50% efficiency, and that electricity costs $0.13 per kw-hr. Not too difficult to have someone run up a few flights of stairs, time them, and get a rough approximation of their power output. I've seen several bigger guys achieve slightly more than 1kw, but only for very short durations. According to some chart I found googling, if I average 20mph on a bike (which I used to easily be able to maintain for well over 20 miles on relatively level, smooth roads), I burn 38 calories per mile. That's 760 calories in an hour. I assume they mean kilocalories, as in food calories. That converts to 3179840 joules per hour. Or, dividing by 3600, errr, uhhh, that's 883 watts, which clearly shows that nutritionists are full of shit when they talk about how many calories you burn while exercising. So, let's say it's 400 watts. And, you're able to convert even 1/3 of them to electricity. 133 watts. That's 7.5 hours of biking to produce one kilowatt-hour.

So, you'd have to ride a bike a little shy of 3000 hours before you broke even on the $50 investment. If you go by the user's experience above where it was difficult to keep a 100 watt lightbulb lit - I'm assuming someone in average shape, you're looking at closer to 4000 hours to break even.3 179 840 joules
See my links. The first one is directly from a power meter attached to the guy's bike.