gumby joints? (supination)

Discussion in 'Health and Fitness' started by mizzou, Jan 28, 2013.

  1. mizzou

    mizzou Diamond Member

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    I don't know if this is a correct term, but I have often referred, "Gumby ankles".

    Gumby ankles are ankles you roll often, but they roll right back into shape and you don't sprain anything.

    I have really long thin feet and fairly thin ankles (not in proportion), so it's easy for me to hyper-supinate my ankles (correct term?) and fall to the ground.

    The falling i guess is a nervous system reaction to take all weight off the ankle so I don't sprain or break it.

    I've done this hiking in boots (not properly tied), running, but most often it occurs when I'm barefoot. Can't say its caused me any trouble though honestly, but it freaks people out when it happens.

    Anyone else have this issue? I was surprised to read that it is a heredity disorder.
     
  2. SociallyChallenged

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    Unless you also have hypermobile joints elsewhere too (like at the fingers, wrists, elbows, knees), it is less likely to be a hereditary ligament pathology and more likely to be an ankle awareness and strength issue. It can even be related to poor hip strength. This is something we treat in physical therapy, especially with athletes who require cutting (soccer, basketball, soccer). Many times, in regular life, they're fine, but as they have to be really aggressive in sport, the "gumby ankles" result in severe ankle sprains and fractures. If it's something you're worried about, it can be re-trained, even if you do have a hereditary condition causing ligament laxity.
     
  3. Munashiimaru

    Munashiimaru Junior Member

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    Long thin extremities and hypermobility is a sign of Marfin's Syndrome, which would be worrisome. I have EDS Type 3 and have had that happen sometimes, but I also have about 30 symptoms of it as well. Poor perioperception (sense of limbs in space) is also a symptom, which might be why you're rolling your ankles a lot.

    The brighton criteria is the standard for diagnosing hypermobility syndromes (http://www.hypermobility.org/diagnosis.php), which also relies on the beighton scale (http://www.hypermobility.org/beighton.php).

    If that's the only thing that happens to you, I'd side with Social about it just being a local issue.
     
  4. SociallyChallenged

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    Definitely. If he sees a physician for this, that's why he'll get the standard ligament laxity tests/screens (Beighton, Brighton) for things like hypermobility, Marfan's, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    The sense is actually called proprioception - the only reason I correct you is just in case anybody wants to look up more information on it.
     
  5. Munashiimaru

    Munashiimaru Junior Member

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    It took three years of ever mounting problems to get someone to send me to be diagnosed, and even then it was only at my behest. This is with me being about as cut and dry of an example as you can get. Chances are no one would take him seriously if he asked about it although he should if he has more problems than just his ankles.