Question Ghetto chiller setup producing good results

Storm-Chaser

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Mar 18, 2020
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This super simple chiller uses a 5 gallon bucket, supercooled outside, then brought back inside once the water temp reaches 33*F. At that point I take my liquid to liquid 60 plate heat exchanger, which has a hot side and a cold side and easily contains well over 40x the surface area of a 360mm radiator, and leave the cold side open, so all the cold water immerses the hot side from all angles. I then use a small pwm pump to cycle cold water through the cold side of the heat exchanger. In other words, not only am I cooling the loop down, I am also using thee 5 gallon bucket to cool the heat exchanger itself. It takes almost 20*F off the loop, so I can bench for a good 30 minutes before the water in the bucket starts to warm. At that point, I just take the second bucket in and swap them out. Bam. Good to go. Also for kicks I "converted" a conventional 240mm radiator (since it was passive anyway) into liquid to liquid heat exchange by dropping the rad in the 5 gallon bucket as well. That alone took 5*F off the top immediately. So the delta T is 5-6*F with the converted radiator and 12-17*F through the 60 plate heat exchanger. With the two buckets, I can basically bench indefinitely at 5.4GHz

60 plate liquid to liquid heat exchanger (that's actually going to be used for a full liquid metal loop in the future)

1638848704494.png





 

Storm-Chaser

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Mar 18, 2020
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What is the best Cinebench single core you have gotten?
I was planning on running that tonight, however, my chiller was a little too chilly and ice started forming and impeding loop flow. So no chiller test for CB until tomorrow.

I did, however, make some runs with CPUz benchmark and CPUz max frequency before it iced up.

Here are my results from earlier today (#1 spot in HWBOT for clock frequency):

All your voltage belongs to me. LOL

1640144233411.png

1640144357052.png
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
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Well typically a liquid to liquid exchanger you would run one side with antifreeze so it doesn't freeze up, the other side with distilled.
If your still getting slush on the distilled loop, then you can run antifreeze on both sides, and that would take care of the slush.

A mixture of about 30/70, should allow you to keep some things in check, unless you really dip very low into the sub degree C's or below 30F.

Also what is that radiator doing in the loop?
Is that whats cooling your cold side in the liquid to liquid exchanger?

Lastly when overclocking with sub degree's you do not want to hammer the voltage too fast yet.
Silicon becomes more and more efficient the lower the temps get, which allows for better overclocks at lower voltage.
So you need to do a bit of dog chasing tail when overclocking with sub degree.

Also beware of condensation around the CPU block.
A good cure all is using gummy eraser, and just putty around the entire cpu socket as shield incase condensation forms, instead of using di greases.
like this picture here:

phase_mounts_screwed.jpg

Make sure you also get the rear of your board as well.
When things get cold... condensation can be a serious PITA.

But the eraser is also far easier to clean and remove then using greases, which can be a nightmare in itself unless you have a professional ultrasonic cleaner made for IC.
 

Storm-Chaser

Member
Mar 18, 2020
170
52
71
Well typically a liquid to liquid exchanger you would run one side with antifreeze so it doesn't freeze up, the other side with distilled.
If your still getting slush on the distilled loop, then you can run antifreeze on both sides, and that would take care of the slush.

A mixture of about 30/70, should allow you to keep some things in check, unless you really dip very low into the sub degree C's or below 30F.

Also what is that radiator doing in the loop?
Is that whats cooling your cold side in the liquid to liquid exchanger?

Lastly when overclocking with sub degree's you do not want to hammer the voltage too fast yet.
Silicon becomes more and more efficient the lower the temps get, which allows for better overclocks at lower voltage.
So you need to do a bit of dog chasing tail when overclocking with sub degree.

Also beware of condensation around the CPU block.
A good cure all is using gummy eraser, and just putty around the entire cpu socket as shield incase condensation forms, instead of using di greases.
like this picture here:

View attachment 54745

Make sure you also get the rear of your board as well.
When things get cold... condensation can be a serious PITA.

But the eraser is also far easier to clean and remove then using greases, which can be a nightmare in itself unless you have a professional ultrasonic cleaner made for IC.
Hey thanks for all the useful information. I didn't expect all that but it will definitely help my OC game, especially since I'm pretty new to sub ambient cooling.

Regarding the radiator in the bucket at the same time, it was part of the "hot side" but instead of ambient air cooling, I was curious to see how it would act/perform as a "liquid to liquid" radiator vs the conventional thinking of just liquid to air.

It seemed to help a bit, but I ditched that idea and now only run the liquid to liquid heat exchanger immersed in cold water. More out of curiosity than anything else. I had removed the pump last week, so the "cold" side of the liquid to liquid heat exchanger was not being cycled, which is actually okay for about 10 minutes are so, allowing you to get some decent results in that time. This setup is pretty effective in terms of delta T because I am hitting the hot side from all sides. I'm essentially chilling the entire liquid to liquid heat exchanger, both from the inside and the outside.

As for condensation, I have to explain my configuration here so you can get a better sense of exactly what I am doing here. I have a finished garage and I put a small desk right in front of the garage door, run my lines under the door to the computer, which is located on the front porch outside. This has a number of benefits, and eliminates condensation because obviously, the ambient temp is consistent between all the hardware. The cold has a substantial effect on raising the OC ceiling without even attaching the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, as yesterday I had it converted back to a standard loop to experiment with how 26*F weather would effect temps in my custom loop. I was able to validate 5.700GHz without even using the chiller. However, I did need the chiller to get 5.751GHz. I have three pumps and two reservoirs with about 1.7 quarts total. Also 4 radiators with almost 1000mm total cooling surface. I cleaned the heatkiller water block last night in preparation for getting my 9900KS. The rest of the system is ready to rip.

1640154201970.png
 

Storm-Chaser

Member
Mar 18, 2020
170
52
71
Well typically a liquid to liquid exchanger you would run one side with antifreeze so it doesn't freeze up, the other side with distilled.
If your still getting slush on the distilled loop, then you can run antifreeze on both sides, and that would take care of the slush.

A mixture of about 30/70, should allow you to keep some things in check, unless you really dip very low into the sub degree C's or below 30F.

Also what is that radiator doing in the loop?
Is that whats cooling your cold side in the liquid to liquid exchanger?

Lastly when overclocking with sub degree's you do not want to hammer the voltage too fast yet.
Silicon becomes more and more efficient the lower the temps get, which allows for better overclocks at lower voltage.
So you need to do a bit of dog chasing tail when overclocking with sub degree.

Also beware of condensation around the CPU block.
A good cure all is using gummy eraser, and just putty around the entire cpu socket as shield incase condensation forms, instead of using di greases.
like this picture here:

View attachment 54745

Make sure you also get the rear of your board as well.
When things get cold... condensation can be a serious PITA.

But the eraser is also far easier to clean and remove then using greases, which can be a nightmare in itself unless you have a professional ultrasonic cleaner made for IC.
And yes, I will need to add some anti-freeze to the custom loop so it doesn't freeze up again if the temps dip below 32... I was just surprised how quickly that happened considering I have three pumps and all on full throttle.

With the 9900K Im planning to order, I already have a z390 MSI MEG z390 ACE motherboard, which had a decent power delivery system and should be able to support benching at 5500Mhz (or higher). I have a full copper heatkiller IV water block and all three pumps are PWM. Two freezemod and one D5. Also I have a 900 watt high current gamer PSU and approximately 1000mm of radiator if set out from end to end.

I am contemplating a white 360mm radiator for the top of the case.







I also have everything else I need to hopefully bench at 5.5Ghz
 

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aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
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just make sure you keep the condensation in check.
You have no idea how many boards i toasted because i got sloppy and didnt cover up with gummy eraser.
Moisture especially condensate will get in anywhere possible, so you want to insulate as much as possible.

Also because of expansion when water freezes if you do not run anti freeze.
That can wreck your radiators really quickly as water expands and forces the channels to expand.
This is why we don't run any rads on a sub ambient loop which can go down to freezing.

Anyhow enjoy your fun in sub ambient cooling.... well i guess its not sub ambient in your location tho.
But yes i had many many fun with chillers, as i owned a couple of them including a full custom TEC one.
Later on realized all that power isn't really worth it on the newer silicon as they seem to run into a overclocking wall and then the voltage wall is a dead end cliff.... meaning... you start damaging it really quickly to the point of no return once those voltages go up, especially on a 10nm die.
 
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Storm-Chaser

Member
Mar 18, 2020
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just make sure you keep the condensation in check.
You have no idea how many boards i toasted because i got sloppy and didnt cover up with gummy eraser.
Moisture especially condensate will get in anywhere possible, so you want to insulate as much as possible.

Also because of expansion when water freezes if you do not run anti freeze.
That can wreck your radiators really quickly as water expands and forces the channels to expand.
This is why we don't run any rads on a sub ambient loop which can go down to freezing.

Anyhow enjoy your fun in sub ambient cooling.... well i guess its not sub ambient in your location tho.
But yes i had many many fun with chillers, as i owned a couple of them including a full custom TEC one.
Later on realized all that power isn't really worth it on the newer silicon as they seem to run into a overclocking wall and then the voltage wall is a dead end cliff.... meaning... you start damaging it really quickly to the point of no return once those voltages go up, especially on a 10nm die.
I made sure the coolant was good to -10*F, and last night it was about 5*F.

First thing this morning I turned it on and was able to make headway with this overclock. Ive been trying to get to 5.8GHz for a week now... I am pushing this chip pretty hard because I don't care about it anymore. Im getting a 9900KF at the end of the month, so as long as it gets me there! lol

1640255288950.png
 

Storm-Chaser

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Mar 18, 2020
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Just a followup on this. If you look at HW bot, this is the #1 fastest 9600KF chip, and like fourth or fifth overall vs the 9600K. So the chiller is working very well.

Something to note that all the 4 or 5 CPUs that are faster than mine are cooled with LN2... so that puts me in a pretty good position as the fastest conventionally cooled system.

I found the limits ;)
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