gb2488hsu-b3-red-eagle - nvidia card - 144hz too ?

Valantar

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Aug 26, 2014
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Uhm, don't you already have two threads regarding this in the Nvidia GPU subforum? Did you not like that I pointed out how you're making bad choices and hope for someone to tell you otherwise here?

Yes, you can use it at 144Hz.
Yes, buying a FreeSync monitor for your 1080Ti is still silly, even in the General Hardware forum. You're buying a monitor whose flagship feature you'll never* be able to use.
Yes, you'll still be CPU limited in GTA V with your non-overclocked 6700K at 1080p.
No, given that the (Google translated) product info states "Accessories: power cable, DVI-D (dual-link), DisplayPort cable, USB cable, audio cable, quick start guide, safety guide", it doesn't seem like it comes with a HDMI cable. But given that it comes with a DisplayPort cable, why does that matter? DP is at the very least equal to HDMI, and in many ways superior.

As I said in the other threads: you made a bad choice selling your 1080 to buy a 1080Ti when you're still using a 1080p60 monitor and can't afford to upgrade that as well. You should have gone the other way around, spending your money now on a 1440p144 panel or similar. But the damage is done. Make the best of it, keep your monitor for a little while, save up until you can buy a suitable monitor. Don't waste your money now buying a monitor that's not really suited to your needs.

Or, of course, buy something like this and save some money by not paying for a feature you can't use. You'd still be silly for buying a 1080p panel for use with a GTX 1080Ti (this is barely understandable for twitch gamers needing near-zero response times, for GTA V it's just weird), but at least you wouldn't be buying a panel with a prominent AMD-only feature for your Nvidia GPU.


*well, unless you buy an AMD GPU in 3-4 years time when your 1080Ti becomes obsolete.


Edit: I hadn't seen your last posts in the other thread. Please don't buy a monitor to use for 6 months. You'll lose money on it (can't sell a 6mo used monitor for full price, after all), and gain pretty much nothing in the meantime. Besides, it'll take you longer to save up for a better one if you spend all your money now! Have a little patience, save your money, try curbing the impulse to spend every dime you have. You'll be better off in the long run.
 
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Bacon1

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You don't need to sell the monitor, it will work fine with your GPU, you just won't be able to enable Freesync/Adaptive-Sync because Nvidia wants to push you to spend extra for GSync.

The monitor itself will work fine though, you'll just have to choose between vsync or tearing, which some people don't care about and others go crazy over.
 

lpio211

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Dec 17, 2016
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Ok i buy this monitor. But how i can enable 144hz on 1080p?

http://gmaster.iiyama.com/it_it/products/g-master-gb2488hsu-b3/


On yijama said:"
Rapid refresh rate and frame rate guarantee smooth, blur free and judder free graphics, with lower latency and lag improving response times for fast paced games. Especially suited to the fast pace games like FPS, racers, MOBA and sports where the 144hz refresh rate delivers the crisp and sharp images needed to raise your game. For 144 fps game-play it is required to have a graphic card that supports dual link 144Hz DVI.

But 1080 ti dont have dual link DVI. So how can i plug 1080 ti using 144hz on this monitor?
 
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Bacon1

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If it doesn't support 144hz over displayport that is odd and yes you'll need a 1080 Ti that does have a dual link DVI port to use it.

Otherwise there isn't any vendor based limitation on the monitor.
 

lpio211

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Dec 17, 2016
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But i found manual from this monitor.


"DVI 144Hz
HDMI 120Hz
DP FreeSync off 144Hz
DP FreeSync on 120Hz "



So i can?
 

Valantar

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Aug 26, 2014
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Seems so, yes. To enable 144Hz refresh, use a connector that supports it and set your display resolution in Windows/whatever game you're playing to 1080p @144Hz. Enable/disable Vsync as you see fit.

Sorry if I'm being annoying here, though, but could you clarify your reasons for choosing that specific model? Does it get amazing reviews? Do you love how it looks? Is there some other reason you're insisting on getting a monitor explicitly designed for non-Nvidia GPUs?

You say you have limited funds for this. As I linked above, if all you want is a 1080p144 display, there are plenty of cheaper alternatives (this list should provide you with some alternatives) at the same store you linked that lack FreeSync. There's even a 27" model at the same price as the one you're talking about. Considering that you can't use FreeSync with an Nvidia GPU, and you're thus paying more for a feature you can't use, that would be an obvious choice in my mind. Care to explain how you're thinking? I'm simply trying to make sure you don't keep making bad purchase decisions here.
 

lehtv

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Dec 8, 2010
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I wouldn't say FreeSync monitors are "explicitly designed for non-NVIDIA GPUs". Thing is, FreeSync is free: it doesn't cost anything for the monitor manufacturer to include FreeSync support in its product. So if all you want is a 1080p 144Hz monitor but you don't want to pay extra for GSync (and with a GTX 1080 Ti, why should you?), then you might as well buy a FreeSync capable monitor that costs the same as a similar non-FreeSync monitor. You lose nothing, and you gain an extra feature that may possibly be of use at some future date or may improve the monitor's resale value.

Essentially it's the same as with CrossFire support in motherboards. It doesn't cost anything for a motherboard manufacturer to include CrossFire support, and there's no reason to say that a motherboard with CrossFire support but without SLI support is "explicitly designed for non-NVIDIA dual graphics card setups". No it isn't, it's just an additional free feature that you don't need to use.
 

Valantar

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Aug 26, 2014
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I wouldn't say FreeSync monitors are "explicitly designed for non-NVIDIA GPUs". Thing is, FreeSync is free: it doesn't cost anything for the monitor manufacturer to include FreeSync support in its product. So if all you want is a 1080p 144Hz monitor but you don't want to pay extra for GSync (and with a GTX 1080 Ti, why should you?), then you might as well buy a FreeSync capable monitor that costs the same as a similar non-FreeSync monitor. You lose nothing, and you gain an extra feature that may possibly be of use at some future date or may improve the monitor's resale value.
While true to a certain extent, FreeSync is still (for some reason - I'm not saying it's logical, just that that's how things are) being billed as a "premium" feature. The OP claims to be short on cash, but insists on buying a display that costs ~30% more than the alternatives yet has no obvious advantages beyond FreeSync. Which ... doesn't make sense in my head. I might be delusional. Who knows?
 

lehtv

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@Valantar I don't see how FreeSync is being billed as a "premium" feature. I've never heard that before. All sorts of cheap monitors have FreeSync these days, and practically all AMD cards support it, not just premium ones. If the Iiyama does indeed cost 30% more than an equivalent non-FreeSync monitor, it's not because of FreeSync. It's the same price as other 144Hz monitors over here in Finland and also in Germany. In komputronik.pl, it seems the Acer is on sale and the Iiyama is unusually expensive.

However, Acer isn't exactly known for high quality monitors, with the possible exception of Predator series monitors with IPS panels. Just because there's no obvious reason why it costs less, doesn't mean there's no reason. The Acer looks a lot like the FreeSync-enabled XF240H in which MonitorNerds identified several small cons:
  • the OSD buttons feel clunky
  • poor out of the box performance
  • colors become a little washed out when the frame rate approaches the peak 144hz
  • monitor reverts to default settings when applying changes in the Nvidia control panel
Perhaps the Iiyama lacks these cons - though the Acer is indeed a much better deal at these prices.

If I bought GTX 1080 Ti I would not buy a 1080p monitor... I would buy this at minimum: Dell S2716DG
 

Valantar

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@Valantar I don't see how FreeSync is being billed as a "premium" feature. I've never heard that before. All sorts of cheap monitors have FreeSync these days, and practically all AMD cards support it, not just premium ones. If the Iiyama does indeed cost 30% more than an equivalent non-FreeSync monitor, it's not because of FreeSync. It's the same price as other 144Hz monitors over here in Finland and also in Germany. In komputronik.pl, it seems the Acer is on sale and the Iiyama is unusually expensive.

However, Acer isn't exactly known for high quality monitors, with the possible exception of Predator series monitors with IPS panels. Just because there's no obvious reason why it costs less, doesn't mean there's no reason. The Acer looks a lot like the FreeSync-enabled XF240H in which MonitorNerds identified several small cons:
  • the OSD buttons feel clunky
  • poor out of the box performance
  • colors become a little washed out when the frame rate approaches the peak 144hz
  • monitor reverts to default settings when applying changes in the Nvidia control panel
Perhaps the Iiyama lacks these cons - though the Acer is indeed a much better deal at these prices.

If I bought GTX 1080 Ti I would not buy a 1080p monitor... I would buy this at minimum: Dell S2716DG
I used that Acer mainly as an example, from what I saw there were several ~24" 144Hz monitors noticeably cheaper than the Iiyama, and as I pointed out even a 27" at the same price.

FreeSync is (thankfully!) starting to creep into lower end monitors as controllers that enable it with a usable range are becoming cheaper and more common, but they still command a slight premium in most segments. As time passes, hopefully that'll go away. I don't see any reason for there to be non-FreeSync monitors at all in a few years (outside of the G-sync ones, I suppose). And you're right, from AMDs point of view it's not meant to be a premium feature, but monitor manufacturers have been grabbing any opportunity to pad margins in recent years.

Oh, and I've been trying to convince the OP (in all of his three threads on the subject) that buying a 1080p monitor even at 144Hz for use with a 1080Ti is silly. He seems extremely resistant to any other feedback than "go for it, that's awesome" though. I'm especially confounded when his reasoning is "I can't afford more now, so I'll replace my 1080p60 monitor now with a 1080p144 one, then buy a 4k one in 6 months" ... Which I can't even wrap my head around. If he can afford a relatively cheap monitor now and an expensive one in half a year, couldn't he then get the expensive one sooner if he just kept his current monitor for a few months? I mean, that's just wasteful. And the current monitor obviously didn't bother him enough to replace it before replacing his 1080 with a 1080Ti (!?), so why the sudden urge to buy something "better" that's less than optimal now? Why not wait it out just a little and get something far better? That's what's baffling me with this whole discussion.
 
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richaron

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While true to a certain extent, FreeSync is still (for some reason - I'm not saying it's logical, just that that's how things are) being billed as a "premium" feature.
Actually in some cases this statement is 100% wrong.

Sure you have a point for some cases, but to state the this is the status quo is completely misleading. My new monitor for example has zero mention of Freesync on it's official product page, there is only a single notation at the very bottom of the ""Specifications" sub-window stating "3)Adaptive Sync support range from 48Hz-100Hz".

By no means is Freesync being marketed, they don't even use the terminology in an PR material. Even Anandtech has no mention of "Freesync", "Adaptive Sync", or any form of "variable refresh" in their product news articles. And the product packaging whilst having space for 13 different little logos and marketing catch-phrases along the bottom still mentions none of this.

Just something to think about before you go on with miss-informed generalizations in the future.
 

Valantar

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Well, sounds like I might have been looking too hard at gaming monitors. If this is (finally) happening, I'm happy to hear it. This was after all the most enticing premise of FS to begin with, and where it has underdelivered the most this far, at least from what I've seen. With current controller and panel technology, there's little to no reason for FS not to be in every display out there.
 

Bacon1

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My new monitor for example has zero mention of Freesync on it's official product page, there is only a single notation at the very bottom of the ""Specifications" sub-window stating "3)Adaptive Sync support range from 48Hz-100Hz".
"Freesync" is an AMD term and to use it requires them send the monitor to AMD to certify. Adaptive-Sync is the standard and anyone can use it. So that might be why its not mentioned in their materials, they didn't send it to AMD for certification (but it should still work fine).

I wonder if that monitor uses the same samsung panel as the Korean 100hz Freesync? Haven't seen that monitor before ty :)
 

richaron

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"Freesync" is an AMD term and to use it requires them send the monitor to AMD to certify. Adaptive-Sync is the standard and anyone can use it.
That's my line...
"Adaptive Sync" is the standard, "Freesync" is AMD's implementation of "Adaptive Sync" with extra stuff like LFC.
I wonder if that monitor uses the same samsung panel as the Korean 100hz Freesync?
Yes I think so (just from lurking forums, nothing concrete). I've noticed no dead/bright pixels so I'm going to use confirmation bias to make myself happy paying for a brand name :D
So that might be why its not mentioned in their materials, they didn't send it to AMD for certification
I thought that initially also, but then I read (unsubstantiated again) there there's another minor dot point on the Asus site which does connect their Adaptive Sync to a Freesync certification. In either case it seems to me Asus is deliberately downplaying certain aspect of these monitors since considering the MX34VQ as a gaming monitor has comparable specs to the flagship PG348Q. If I were to don my trusty tinfoil hat I may ponder whether Asus is walking on eggshells trying not to provoke nV rage
 
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Bacon1

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That's my line...




Yes I think so (just from lurking forums, nothing concrete). I've noticed no dead/bright pixels so I'm going to use confirmation bias to make myself happy paying for a brand name :D


I thought that initially also, but then I read (unsubstantiated again) there there's another minor dot point on the Asus site which does connect their Adaptive Sync to a Freesync certification. In either case it seems to me Asus is deliberately downplaying certain aspect of these monitors since considering the MX34VQ as a gaming monitor has comparable specs to the flagship PG348Q. If I were to don my trusty tinfoil hat I may ponder whether Asus is walking on eggshells trying not to provoke nV rage
Yeah that monitor sounds sweet! I love my 34" 75hz UW, if those were out now I'd go for it though for only a little more $$ for the extra 25hz :D
 

Valantar

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My new monitor
As an aside: that monitor is the closest thing I've seen to an ideal monitor. Hot damn. Ultrawide QHD, 1800R curvature, VA panel, 3000:1 contrast ratio, FS support. If it only had a slightly wider FS range to enable frame doubling (or whatever it's called, I can't remember) ditched that silly foot, and added a VESA mount, I'd be sold.

Edit: oh, and integrated the damn power brick. Seeing those cheapo external PSUs attached to $500+ monitors makes me angry. Heck, seeing external power bricks on pretty much any monitor makes me angry. That's just cheap, bad engineering.
 

Bacon1

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If it only had a slightly wider FS range to enable frame doubling
It should support it. LFC only requires 2x with 2.5x as recommended. It should be able to double a 47 frame to 94hz and stay within range.
 

Valantar

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It should support it. LFC only requires 2x with 2.5x as recommended. It should be able to double a 47 frame to 94hz and stay within range.
I thought 2.5 was required, but if I'm wrong, that's great :p Now if it only had a VESA mount so I could ditch that horrible, non-adjustable stand...
 

richaron

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Yeah LFC only needs 2x now, the inital 2.5x was to allow some extra leeway for the monitors or algorithms or something. Which is why the Sammy CF791(what I was originally lusting over) has two different Freesync modes 80-100, and 48-100. The initial being a joke and there were reports of the 48-100 mode displaying a "flicker" a lot of the time.

I've also read report this monitor sometimes "flickers" right down around the 45-50fps range where LFC is kicking in/out and again I guess this relates to the initial 2.5x figures supplied. The flicker seems minor and something I can live with or work around though.

The non-adjustable stand and lack of a VESA mount are negatives, but in my situation they're a non-issue since my desk is pretty big and the monitor already has it's own little shelf up the back. At least for me needing a VESA mount is more about some fantasy uber setup some time in the distant future... But the external power brick for sure is a plus; I like modularity and I like keeping heat and high voltage away from my baby.

I held off for a very, very, long time waiting for this monitor. Years on a crappy 22" TN FHD because there was nothing out there which ticked enough boxes for me. I'm glad the time has come :)
 

Valantar

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Yeah LFC only needs 2x now, the inital 2.5x was to allow some extra leeway for the monitors or algorithms or something. Which is why the Sammy CF791(what I was originally lusting over) has two different Freesync modes 80-100, and 48-100. The initial being a joke and there were reports of the 48-100 mode displaying a "flicker" a lot of the time.

I've also read report this monitor sometimes "flickers" right down around the 45-50fps range where LFC is kicking in/out and again I guess this relates to the initial 2.5x figures supplied. The flicker seems minor and something I can live with or work around though.

The non-adjustable stand and lack of a VESA mount are negatives, but in my situation they're a non-issue since my desk is pretty big and the monitor already has it's own little shelf up the back. At least for me needing a VESA mount is more about some fantasy uber setup some time in the distant future... But the external power brick for sure is a plus; I like modularity and I like keeping heat and high voltage away from my baby.

I held off for a very, very, long time waiting for this monitor. Years on a crappy 22" TN FHD because there was nothing out there which ticked enough boxes for me. I'm glad the time has come :)
Hm. How long have you had the monitor for? And do you often play games that force fps numbers as low as 45-50? If not, I'd love to hear about your experiences in a while, when that (perhaps) has become more common. Personally, I'm not very sensitive to stuff like that, so I doubt it'd bother me, but you never know.

As for the VESA requirement for me, I have my current monitor (Dell U2711) on top of a DIY monitor stand (that lifts it 4" or so) and at its tallest position. For me, that's pretty much perfect. Then again, I have a rather bothersome neck. For my next monitor, I'd probably be looking at getting an Ergotech Freedom Arm or something similar just for the sheer flexibility and ease of use (no more contortionist moves to see where I'm plugging in cables!). As such, the only way I'd consider a monitor with a tilt adjustment-only stand is if it had a VESA mount.

As for external power bricks, my experience with those is that they (too often) are an excuse for monitor makers to cheap out on power delivery components. I've seen quite a few of them fail (family, friends, work), while I've never seen a single PSU failure in a monitor that has it built in. My U2711 has been in heavy use for ... 6 years now (I had to look it up :p), and that thing runs hot (it's CCFL backlit and rated for 113W "typical" power draw without using the audio output or USB hub). My girlfriend's U2713HM that's right next to mine is so much cooler to the touch it's hard to believe. Not to mention that external power bricks mean that the monitor isn't grounded, and I also hate the flimsy, stiff, impossible-to-straighten-properly DC cables usually running up to the monitor from external power bricks. But then again, you might not share my sentiments, and I guess YMMV in terms of reliability.
 

richaron

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I'll answer backwards. I've also had a few power bricks fail, which is a large reason I like them external/modular and replaceable. But I see no inherent correlation between being external and being "cheap". Nor do I see the connection with crappy cables; I've purchased plenty of products in the past with high quality accessories (although admittedly many of these particular products were marketed as "premium").

And to claim "external power bricks mean that the monitor isn't grounded" is just wrong. AFAIK a 3 pin from the wall power brick (which mine is) can certainly ground the DC side over the ground line.

As I said I have a similar setup with a monitor shelf/stand so a short height monitor is fine with me. I admit more customization would make for a better overall product, but again it works for me. And even your example of needing a VESA mount sounds quite similar to my own "fantasy uber setup" at some point in the future (which could be quite easily be worked around in the mean time).

Lastly, I've only had the monitor a couple of days and I'm still running a GCN 1.0 GPU so I can't even use Freesync yet (but of course I'll chime in on these forums if appropritate in the future). It might sound silly to some people but I rate a monitor as one of the best investments in computer hardware, and in general I buy products for the long term. My current system overhaul plans have a 6-12month time frame, but at least I've pwned the monitor and apart from gaming I can take full advantage of it right now.
 

Valantar

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Aug 26, 2014
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Yeah, I wholeheartedly agree on that last point. Monitors are not ephemeral, upgrade every second year-type products. At least they shouldn't be, and there's no reason to treat them as such. Buying a monitor that's "ahead of its time" in terms of matching up to your current hardware is always a good idea in my mind, at least. When I bought the U2711 I had just upgraded from dual HD 4850s to a single HD 6950 - but I don't think even that card could really run 2011 games at 1440p60 Ultra. Still, I would rather lower graphics settings and have the wonderful extra work area and color gamut of that monitor than keep my previous crappy Samsung TN panel.

As for grounding: my understanding is that with a standard grounded AC power connector on one end and a standard DC barrel jack on the other, grounding ends at the power brick, possibly even the AC side of the power brick. Otherwise, any "grounded" part of the monitor chassis would essentially be live. Unless they use one of those fancy 3-pole barrel jacks that many laptops use (large-ish ones with an inner sleeve, outer sleeve and central pin), the standard ones have only two terminals, and as such no grounding. Which also relates to the use of thin, stiff, cheap two-conductor "ribbon" style DC wiring - three-conductor wiring in the same form just isn't feasible for external use, so these wires tend to be of better quality.

Of course, as you say, this is probably not the case in premium products. If it were, I wouldn't ever consider buying one. As it stands, I'd definitely consider compromising on this point - if that got me all/most the other goodies I want. I don't think any of the monitors I've seen PSU failures in have qualified as anything near "premium". And of course, my Thinkpad power brick is still going strong after 7-or-so years of use (partially "desktop" use, at least for 2 or so years). So of course, there's no direct relation between external power bricks and them being cheap crap. I'm simply saying that the added heat requirements of placing the PSU internally pretty much forces the manufacturers to not cheap out on crappy low-temp electrolytic capacitors and the like. They might not do so anyway, but I regard it as an extra insurance of sorts. Then again, I live in a country where consumer protection laws give us what pretty much amounts to mandatory 5-year warranties on all non-portable equipment. So I'm not overly worried about an internal unit dying and not being easily replaceable on my part :p
 

richaron

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the standard ones have only two terminals, and as such no grounding.
*Yeah DC usually has 2 terminals, and one of those is perfect for grounding...

Also I feel it was a bit pretentious of me to use the word "premium". I just wanted to convey the point that more than once in the past I have used cables which were bundled with with products and found them to be far superior to generic cables.

Edit: *Perhaps you are confusing this with the power bricks which only have 2 pins on the AC side; They are fairly common and obviously these are not grounded.
 
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Valantar

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*Yeah DC usually has 2 terminals, and one of those is perfect for grounding...

Also I feel it was a bit pretentious of me to use the word "premium". I just wanted to convey the point that more than once in the past I have used cables which were bundled with with products and found them to be far superior to generic cables.

Edit: *Perhaps you are confusing this with the power bricks which only have 2 pins on the AC side; They are fairly common and obviously these are not grounded.
I've always heard that "ground" in most DC circuits essentially is jargon for 0V/positive terminal (after all, the DC circuit doesn't care wether it's connected to a grounded power supply or a battery), and doesn't actually have any relation to grounding/earthing in AC circuits. Of course I might have been told wrong, I'm no electician or electical engineer. It seems odd to me to connect the positive terminal directly to ground, but my understanding of the actual circuitry inside a power supply is limited at best. Oh well.
 

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