former high tech guy needs info on modern tech (power supply)

Discussion in 'Power Supplies' started by puddnheadwilson, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. puddnheadwilson

    puddnheadwilson Junior Member

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    Hi guys! I am 25 and have not kept up on computer specs like I once did! I actually took a computer repair class in high school so I know the basics.

    I am looking for a new pc to upgrade. This is the stock build that I am seeing at the moment.

    • Processor: Intel Core i5-2320 processor(6MB Cache, 3.0GHz)
    • Genuine Windows 7 Home Premium
    • Inspiron 620 Minitower
    • 500 GB SATA Hard Drive (7200 RPM)
    • 500 GB SATA Hard Drive (7200 RPM)
    • 8 GB Dual Channel DDR3 SDRAM at 1333MHz (2 DIMMs)
    • 16X DVD +/- RW Drive
    • 300 Watt power supply
    I am hoping to get a 1-2gb graphics card.

    Might I need to upgrade the power supply that comes with the computer?
     
  2. Harvey

    Harvey Administrator<br>Elite Member
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    Good start on your quest. First, you need to know how big a supply (how many watts) you need for your anticipated build. Include a little extra for future expansion such as a second hard drive or other components you may want to add later.

    Many online vendors power have a power supply calculator page on their site like this one on newegg.com that will give you an idea of how much power you need.

    Then, consider whether you want a high efficiency supply. Typically, these cost a little more, but they use less power, overall, so they don't cost as much to run, and they run cooler, so you'll also save on the cooling requirements for the build.

    Once you have those parameters, you can start looking for info about the reliability of models that meet your requirements from various manufacturers. Many name brand vendors get their raw supplies from several actual OEM manufacturers, including Seasonic and others, and package them under their own names so you may find a better deal on exactly the same supply with different manufacturers' labels.

    I'll leave it to others to recommend specific makes and models that meet your needs.

    Hope that helps. :)
     
    #2 Harvey, Mar 2, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2012
  3. puddnheadwilson

    puddnheadwilson Junior Member

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    Thanks! That does help a little!

    The build I mentioned is from the Dell outlet.

    I am noticing something listed on the Newegg power supplies.

    PCI-Express Connector:

    What exactly does this mean and do most modern express cards need to be connected directly to the power supply rather than just the motherboard?
     
    #3 puddnheadwilson, Mar 2, 2012
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2012
  4. PowerYoga

    PowerYoga Diamond Member

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    Most modern gphx cards do need direct power supply. It's usually a 6-8 pin connector that goes directly into your graphics card, and some cards need 2 of those.

    Here's a good site that has all the images, the ones you're referring to are on the bottom row.

    http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuconnectors/connectors.html
     
  5. Smoblikat

    Smoblikat Diamond Member

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    PCI-e means that its either 6 or 8 pin. Most mid range and up cards require at least one 6 pin.
     
  6. puddnheadwilson

    puddnheadwilson Junior Member

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    WOW! I really did get left in the dust. I bought an Acer computer a few years ago and bought a graphics card later on, not knowing I needed to upgrade the power supply. I sold it to one of the guys in church. The graphics card burnt, literally, a few weeks later. I felt bad for him. Thankfully I had tossed the card in for free!
     
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