For those of you who are older,a ?

runzwithsizorz

Diamond Member
Jan 24, 2002
3,500
14
76
I personally, do not like being addressed by a clerk, or cashier as dude, chief, bro, buddy, pal, sweety, honey, ETC. Especially when it is obvious that I'm 30, or 40 years older than they are. When I meet someone, I refer to them as maam, miss, or sir, until I am given permission to do otherwise, regardless of their age. I'm I just too old fashioned?
LOL, perhaps I am, I still have old letters from my mother when I traveled away from home a long time ago, they were addressed, *MASTER* Runz.
 

K7SN

Senior member
Jun 21, 2015
353
0
0
My friends call me Bob, I detest formality; only salesman call me Mr. I don't give a fat rat's arse what those I don't know call me. The younger kids I know, less than about 12 always treat me with respect but it may be because I raced motorcycles with the fathers and grandfathers and am now considered a source of amusing tales of their fathers and grandfathers foibles while racing. It is what it is; worry about something more important like will there be any Medicare or social security next decade.
 

highland145

Lifer
Oct 12, 2009
43,290
5,721
136
My friends call me Bob, I detest formality; only salesman call me Mr. I don't give a fat rat's arse what those I don't know call me. The younger kids I know, less than about 12 always treat me with respect but it may be because I raced motorcycles with the fathers and grandfathers and am now considered a source of amusing tales of their fathers and grandfathers foibles while racing. It is what it is; worry about something more important like will there be any Medicare or social security next decade.
Hi, Bob,

Actually, there's another medicare cut with the "new" budget. Do old people not pay attention, understand, vote, feed their cats....????
 

IronWing

No Lifer
Jul 20, 2001
68,980
26,846
136
Do you mean to say you actually take offense to someone saying "not a problem" to you?

Or did I miss an inside joke there?
"Not a problem" is usually offered by folks whose job it is to carry out the activities that are "not a problem". Of course it isn't a problem; it's the freaking job. If it is a problem for the person to do the job, they should find another job.
 

skyking

Lifer
Nov 21, 2001
21,997
4,738
146
I got "sweetied" the other day and that opened the door. She got "honeyed" "Deared" you name it. It was fun for me :D
 

K7SN

Senior member
Jun 21, 2015
353
0
0
Hi, Bob,

Actually, there's another medicare cut with the "new" budget. Do old people not pay attention, understand, vote, feed their cats....????

I am painfully aware that I'll get no cost of living increase next year; that I face a 2% cut and that my Medicare co-pay will increase and I'll be paying more and getting less.

I guess most of my friends are 30 or more years younger and I don't think about next year when I'll have to start drawing my 401k. I think about the Parker 425 and Mint 400.

if your as old as you act, I'm a kid, not one of those younger people calling OP names he doesn't like. If you only count my age or the fact that I still maintain Harry Truman was the best president in my lifetime, I'm ancient.
 
Last edited:

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
20,352
5,108
136
I personally, do not like being addressed by a clerk, or cashier as dude, chief, bro, buddy, pal, sweety, honey, ETC. Especially when it is obvious that I'm 30, or 40 years older than they are. When I meet someone, I refer to them as maam, miss, or sir, until I am given permission to do otherwise, regardless of their age. I'm I just too old fashioned?
LOL, perhaps I am, I still have old letters from my mother when I traveled away from home a long time ago, they were addressed, *MASTER* Runz.

You suffer from a condition known as "manners". Tragically, it appears to have been cured in most people these days.
 

RossMAN

Grand Nagus
Feb 24, 2000
78,794
266
116
I've been called boss, chief, bro, dude, sweetie, etc.

As long as the interaction is quick, doesn't really bother me.
 

Jeff7

Lifer
Jan 4, 2001
41,599
19
81
"Not a problem" is usually offered by folks whose job it is to carry out the activities that are "not a problem". Of course it isn't a problem; it's the freaking job. If it is a problem for the person to do the job, they should find another job.
But if you go there, I'd extend it to the point that trite little verbal exchanges aren't even necessary.
"Thank you" or "you're welcome" or "have a nice day" can be assumed non-verbally.
(Or even a nonverbal "fuck off, ya wanker," depending on the company you keep.:))

In that context, "not a problem" carries as little weight as "thank you" or "how are you doing today?".
 
Last edited:

Ham n' Eggs

Member
Sep 22, 2015
181
0
0
the only question that should matter is whether they are trying to be polite or trying to condescend. If polite, then what's the problem, they may think your lingo is funny as well. If condescending or rude, who cares anyway. Seriously, who cares what some cashier or secretary thinks, they are not the focal point of the world.
 

lxskllr

No Lifer
Nov 30, 2004
57,401
7,585
126
the only question that should matter is whether they are trying to be polite or trying to condescend. If polite, then what's the problem, they may think your lingo is funny as well. If condescending or rude, who cares anyway. Seriously, who cares what some cashier or secretary thinks, they are not the focal point of the world.

Pretty much this. I especially hate when a salesman's trying to kiss my ass, and I get extra flattery and politeness. I prefer courtesy to ritual.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
37,469
8,071
136
Myself, if I'm going to be addressed I prefer it to be by name, otherwise there's no necessity to call me "sir" or anything else. If they don't know my name, I'm just that person in front of them, there's no good reason to paste a synthetic moniker on me.
 

1sikbITCH

Diamond Member
Jan 3, 2001
4,194
574
126
I personally, do not like being addressed by a clerk, or cashier as dude, chief, bro, buddy, pal, sweety, honey, ETC. Especially when it is obvious that I'm 30, or 40 years older than they are. When I meet someone, I refer to them as maam, miss, or sir, until I am given permission to do otherwise, regardless of their age. I'm I just too old fashioned?
LOL, perhaps I am, I still have old letters from my mother when I traveled away from home a long time ago, they were addressed, *MASTER* Runz.

I'm a heathen so you can't go by me but I'm almost 50 and have been addressing lawyers, doctors, and other professionals that I know on a personal level as "my brutha, dude, man" my whole professional life. Most of these are not the pretentious fucks you might imagine, just dudes with jobs like the rest of us.
I prefer to be addressed casually as well. Don't even wear shoes unless convention dictates it (and sometimes not even then).

I completely flip the script and address young people as Sir and Madam as some sort of lesson on how THEY should be treating people :D