For those of you making 6 figures, how old were you when you broke that barrier?

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spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,469
5
76
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
I thought I did, but someone already shot that down in this thread.

No, you didn't.

And as far as IBM is concerned they are still a premium employer. But they are a HUGE customer of outsourced "grunt work". Meaning they are paid to find the "grunts".
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
1
0
Originally posted by: Safeway
I will make ~$100k once I graduate, first year. My girlfriend will make ~$115k once she graduates, first year. Booo-fvcking-urns.

You can't say for sure what's going to happen in the future, so there's no use talking about it. Let us know when you're actually making it.
 

6000SUX

Golden Member
May 8, 2005
1,504
0
0
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: rh71
I'd like to see Spidey confirm that himself. I have a feeling he meant anyone with a degree and working full time.

I meant degreed and full time. By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate. But I've been a corporate boy for way too long and maybe have a warped sense of reality.

Most salary grades in a company are posted internally. Sr level staff positions were generally in the 80-120 range. This is STAFF level, not management. So by age 30 you should be in a Sr. staff position or already in management. This is in the mid-west, medium cost of living city.

I don't necessarily disbelieve, but I've worked at some awfully big companies and don't recall this sort of pay structure being the norm (IBM, Raytheon, Northeast Utilities among others). Where are you getting your figures?

Personal experience. Did you actually work for these companies or were you contract labor? In other words, who signed your check.

IBM - did you work for IBM or did you contract for IBM Global Services? Because even working for IBM Global means you should be above 100K if you are a pro. IBM pays very well.

I didn't say I didn't make six figures, just that this pay structure wasn't the norm. I worked directly for these companies.

I just think that if you define "professional" as "office worker", you're bound to run into some problems. Companies couldn't make money if they paid such a high salary to all office workers.
 

ponyo

Lifer
Feb 14, 2002
19,689
2,811
126
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: spidey07

IBM - did you work for IBM or did you contract for IBM Global Services? Because even working for IBM Global means you should be above 100K if you are a pro. IBM pays very well.

I've worked directly for IBM two times, and they don't pay very well. I don't know anyone in my department who made over 100k, other than the departmental manager. They have the reputation of being a good company, one which they earned long ago, but they're no longer a good company to work for. The running joke was that it stood for "I've Been Mislead"

I've heard the same thing.

Spidey's pay structure looks pretty high and aggressive for large companies but what do I know. I'm not a professional. :)
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,469
5
76
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
I didn't say I didn't make six figures, just that this pay structure wasn't the norm. I worked directly for these companies.

I just think that if you define "professional" as "office worker", you're bound to run into some problems. Companies couldn't make money if they paid such a high salary to all office workers.

You're not getting the meaning of the word "professional".

Any white colar monkey is a "office worker". Professional brings something more to the table:

1) posess knowledge and experience/decision making abilities within or above the realm of their peers
2) their decisions/opions are questioned (with dubious authority, rank) and respected both at the same time, more emphasis on respected
3) It's all about who you know.

hey hotchic! why don't you chime in on your own thread!
 

nageov3t

Lifer
Feb 18, 2004
42,816
83
91
can't remember if I've replied to this thread or not :eek: but no.

I'm 25 and work at a noc for a hosting company... pay's good enough for me (I'm not drinking champagne every night with dinner, but I've got enough to pay the bills, have fun, and put money away into savings / 401K every month without having to really worry about my finances), I've got great benefits, plenty of free time to do important things that actually matter, and I like what I do. honestly, I'd be surprised if anyone in my company made more than 100K outside the top echelon of managers / C*O's.

I've also got stock options that'll (hopefully) pay off big someday, but I'm planning on getting off the corporate treadmill in the next 4-5 years anyways. I'm going to start going to grad school two falls from now (aiming for fall semester of '08) to get a PhD in English Lit and hopefully land a teaching job.
 

6000SUX

Golden Member
May 8, 2005
1,504
0
0
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
I didn't say I didn't make six figures, just that this pay structure wasn't the norm. I worked directly for these companies.

I just think that if you define "professional" as "office worker", you're bound to run into some problems. Companies couldn't make money if they paid such a high salary to all office workers.

You're not getting the meaning of the word "professional".

Any white colar monkey is a "office worker". Professional brings something more to the table:

1) posess knowledge and experience/decision making abilities within or above the realm of their peers
2) their decisions/opions are questioned (with dubious authority, rank) and respected both at the same time, more emphasis on respected
3) It's all about who you know.

hey hotchic! why don't you chime in on your own thread!

Your definition is circular, nebulous, and not the norm. But to each his own.
 

tfinch2

Lifer
Feb 3, 2004
22,114
1
0
Originally posted by: spidey07
Major has little to do with what you earn. Very little.

It's all about networking/marketing and building a name for yourself.

Originally posted by: spidey07
By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate.

Originally posted by: spidey07
1) posess knowledge and experience/decision making abilities within or above the realm of their peers

Originally posted by: spidey07
3) It's all about who you know.

Is it who you know, what you know, or both? :confused:

In every response you say the opposite if what you said previously.
 

Trey22

Diamond Member
Oct 31, 2003
5,540
0
76
Hopefully January '08 brings me to/over 6 figures for the first time... 31 yrs old.
 

Svnla

Lifer
Nov 10, 2003
17,999
1,396
126
This thread is full of BS, especially the ones with 100K or higher salaries and in their 20s. Show me your 2006 W-2 form and driver license, until then I say shens.

I have no doubt that some of you are doing very well, but this is a bit too much. Fact: The median income for the WHOLE U.S. family is less than 50K/year, yet there are so many ATOTers with high salaries AND high posts counts in the poll (I think I missed the memo about the new pay structure, higher post per day in ATOT = higher salary in real life).

<<<---------- blonde hair, blue eyes, 6'4", 1% body fat, trillionaire, hang out with supermodels and moviestars for breakfast/lunch/dinner, has 75 huge mansions around the world, over 100 exotic vehicles, .....blah blah blah.....well, you know the drill .LOL
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
1
0
Originally posted by: Svnla

<<<---------- blonde hair, blue eyes, 6'4", 1% body fat, trillionaire, hang out with supermodels and moviestars for breakfast/lunch/dinner, has 75 huge mansions around the world, over 100 exotic vehicles, .....blah blah blah.....well, you know the drill .LOL

Damn, you too?
 

BrownTown

Diamond Member
Dec 1, 2005
5,314
1
0
man you people got it made, I would be happy to make 100,000 dollars by the time I was 50 (in adjusted income for 2007$ of course). I'm gonna be exstatic if I come out of college making over 50,000$ a year, but more likely I would expect 40,000$, do all you people have degrees for like top 10 engineering programs or wtf? Maybe ya'll just all live in California and New Yory and your money is worthless compared to the deep south?
 

Suture

Senior member
Sep 17, 2003
454
0
0
29. I work with biometric technology (fingerprint scanning, iris scanning, hand geometry, facial recognitions, etc.). I live in the Northern VA area, it's decent. Wish I went to college though.
 

Descartes

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
13,968
2
0
Originally posted by: Svnla
This thread is full of BS, especially the ones with 100K or higher salaries and in their 20s. Show me your 2006 W-2 form and driver license, until then I say shens.

Sorry you think so. It's not as uncommon as you might think. When in my early 20s (26 now), I used to think I was a bit of an anomaly, but after spending a lot more time in a lot of different cities I realize that it's rather quite common; in fact, many are younger than I am. I was somewhat lucky, but I know of a few 23 year olds pulling ~$125k-$150k.

I'm in software, and almost every talented software person in the industry today will make at least $100k.

Don't sell yourself short.
 

ultimatebob

Lifer
Jul 1, 2001
25,135
2,445
126
Originally posted by: Feldenak
I'll never make 6 figures at my current job.

With inflation adjustments and another promotion, I should be able to hit it within 5 years.

Of course, a salary of $100,000 a year isn't much to brag about when the average salary will be $80,000 by then :(
 

vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
62,398
8,189
126
Originally posted by: Svnla
This thread is full of BS, especially the ones with 100K or higher salaries and in their 20s. Show me your 2006 W-2 form and driver license, until then I say shens.

I have no doubt that some of you are doing very well, but this is a bit too much. Fact: The median income for the WHOLE U.S. family is less than 50K/year, yet there are so many ATOTers with high salaries AND high posts counts in the poll (I think I missed the memo about the new pay structure, higher post per day in ATOT = higher salary in real life).

<<<---------- blonde hair, blue eyes, 6'4", 1% body fat, trillionaire, hang out with supermodels and moviestars for breakfast/lunch/dinner, has 75 huge mansions around the world, over 100 exotic vehicles, .....blah blah blah.....well, you know the drill .LOL

There are quite a few MD's, PharmD's, Lawyers, i-bankers, and consultants on this board that could easily make that in their mid-late 20's. Plus you can throw in the commissioned based sales people (mortgage lenders, car sales, realtors, ect) and that's even more that could acheive that.

Yes, there's a lot of BS being flung, but there is also decent amount of truth in the 26-30 age bracket.
 

ultimatebob

Lifer
Jul 1, 2001
25,135
2,445
126
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
I thought I did, but someone already shot that down in this thread.

No, you didn't.

And as far as IBM is concerned they are still a premium employer. But they are a HUGE customer of outsourced "grunt work". Meaning they are paid to find the "grunts".

I haven't met an IBM employee that was happy about how much they make, and I know a lot of them that work in my area. I'd imagine that the sales folks make out better, but the IT staff all feel like they're getting screwed.
 

BrownTown

Diamond Member
Dec 1, 2005
5,314
1
0
I'll I know is my dad has two masters degrees and went to a top 25 university and didn't make 100,000$ till he was 50 years old as a nuclear engineer. I also know that the average starting salary for engineers like myself is in the 40,000 thousand doallr range, byt brother goes to MIT, the average there is like 60,000-70,000, it seems amazing to me that so many people could be making so much money here, now obviously people get raiswes, but if the average MIT graduate is making 70,000 when they graduate they would need a 30,000$ raise in 3-4 years to make 100,000$ by the time they are 25, and that is the number one engineering program in the country.
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,469
5
76
Originally posted by: tfinch2
Originally posted by: spidey07
Major has little to do with what you earn. Very little.

It's all about networking/marketing and building a name for yourself.

Originally posted by: spidey07
By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate.

Originally posted by: spidey07
1) posess knowledge and experience/decision making abilities within or above the realm of their peers

Originally posted by: spidey07
3) It's all about who you know.

Is it who you know, what you know, or both? :confused:

In every response you say the opposite if what you said previously.

Not really. It's a big mix of the two, but more on the who you know side. Who you know doesn't make you a professional, but it does make you a whole ton of more money.
 

Descartes

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
13,968
2
0
Originally posted by: BrownTown
I'll I know is my dad has two masters degrees and went to a top 25 university and didn't make 100,000$ till he was 50 years old as a nuclear engineer. I also know that the average starting salary for engineers like myself is in the 40,000 thousand doallr range, byt brother goes to MIT, the average there is like 60,000-70,000, it seems amazing to me that so many people could be making so much money here, now obviously people get raiswes, but if the average MIT graduate is making 70,000 when they graduate they would need a 30,000$ raise in 3-4 years to make 100,000$ by the time they are 25, and that is the number one engineering program in the country.

For the most part, I wouldn't be looking to MIT graduates as a benchmark for income. They'll make a good income, sure, but I'd guess that most don't go into engineering for the money; there are much easier paths to making much more money.
 

vi edit

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 28, 1999
62,398
8,189
126
Originally posted by: Descartes
Originally posted by: BrownTown
I'll I know is my dad has two masters degrees and went to a top 25 university and didn't make 100,000$ till he was 50 years old as a nuclear engineer. I also know that the average starting salary for engineers like myself is in the 40,000 thousand doallr range, byt brother goes to MIT, the average there is like 60,000-70,000, it seems amazing to me that so many people could be making so much money here, now obviously people get raiswes, but if the average MIT graduate is making 70,000 when they graduate they would need a 30,000$ raise in 3-4 years to make 100,000$ by the time they are 25, and that is the number one engineering program in the country.

For the most part, I wouldn't be looking to MIT graduates as a benchmark for income. They'll make a good income, sure, but I'd guess that most don't go into engineering for the money; there are much easier paths to making much more money.

And the other thing is that with many "educated" professions they start out at a much higher salary but it's a glass ceiling that you really can't go any higher than. Sure you get small raises and possibly some sort of merit/performance bonuses, but really there isn't anywhere else to go. That is the situation my wife is in as a Pharmacist. She hit the ground running with a pretty lucrative salary. But she doesn't have really anwhere to go from there. In a deparment with 35'ish pharmacists, there are only 3 managers and a director. There is no other dichotemy to the department. And really the managers don't make enough more to merit the headache. You become a manager because you want to become a manger. Not for the raise.

Same really goes for the engineering types. If you stay with the same company you really don't have anywhere to go. There just isn't much of a career ladder to climb. The only choice you have is to employer hop every 5 years and try to score a big raise with each jump.

It's not like the consulting/sales/self employed people that simply can work harder/longer and make more money through bigger contracts, more sales, expanded territory, ect.

From the IT side things, I've actually got a decent chance to expand my income. I could come very close to doubling my income in a matter of 5 years by progressing through the ranks if I chose to do so.

Some positions/professions just lend themselves to more vertical progression than others.
 

Special K

Diamond Member
Jun 18, 2000
7,098
0
76
Originally posted by: vi_edit
Originally posted by: Descartes
Originally posted by: BrownTown
I'll I know is my dad has two masters degrees and went to a top 25 university and didn't make 100,000$ till he was 50 years old as a nuclear engineer. I also know that the average starting salary for engineers like myself is in the 40,000 thousand doallr range, byt brother goes to MIT, the average there is like 60,000-70,000, it seems amazing to me that so many people could be making so much money here, now obviously people get raiswes, but if the average MIT graduate is making 70,000 when they graduate they would need a 30,000$ raise in 3-4 years to make 100,000$ by the time they are 25, and that is the number one engineering program in the country.

For the most part, I wouldn't be looking to MIT graduates as a benchmark for income. They'll make a good income, sure, but I'd guess that most don't go into engineering for the money; there are much easier paths to making much more money.

And the other thing is that with many "educated" professions they start out at a much higher salary but it's a glass ceiling that you really can't go any higher than. Sure you get small raises and possibly some sort of merit/performance bonuses, but really there isn't anywhere else to go. That is the situation my wife is in as a Pharmacist. She hit the ground running with a pretty lucrative salary. But she doesn't have really anwhere to go from there. In a deparment with 35'ish pharmacists, there are only 3 managers and a director. There is no other dichotemy to the department. And really the managers don't make enough more to merit the headache. You become a manager because you want to become a manger. Not for the raise.

Same really goes for the engineering types. If you stay with the same company you really don't have anywhere to go. There just isn't much of a career ladder to climb. The only choice you have is to employer hop every 5 years and try to score a big raise with each jump.

It's not like the consulting/sales/self employed people that simply can work harder/longer and make more money through bigger contracts, more sales, expanded territory, ect.

From the IT side things, I've actually got a decent chance to expand my income. I could come very close to doubling my income in a matter of 5 years by progressing through the ranks if I chose to do so.

Some positions/professions just lend themselves to more vertical progression than others.

Why do you say there is no ladder to climb at engineering companies? Every company I interviewed with (Intel, AMD, nvidia, etc.) gave me a very detailed breakdown of the ranking structure at their company, and there are a lot of positions to climb from the positions they intially hire college grads into.

I haven't started my job yet but I didn't get the impression that it was that limited. Oh well, I can always go back to school for something else if I have to.