For those of you making 6 figures, how old were you when you broke that barrier?

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Aharami

Lifer
Aug 31, 2001
21,296
149
106
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: rh71
bah, finance industry... I'm so ridiculously jealous in some ways... my wife is in IT like me but she works for a financial firm. Her bonus this year was more than my bonus in 7 years total, and counting. I will never get to 6 figures at this job, but it's very comfortable here. Give and take I guess... I don't have the pressures or need to put in the hours.

So you've "settled" then.

This post is a wake-up call for all professionals that aren't at 100K by age 30.

YOU ARE NOT WORKING HARD ENOUGH NOR ARE YOU TRYING!

i have 5 more years to make up 48.5K! thanks for the wake up call
 

Atheus

Diamond Member
Jun 7, 2005
7,313
2
0
LOL @ 30 votes for under 20 years old :roll:

I'd probably be making 100k if I converted it to American dollars, but considering things are probably more expensive here and I don't plan on moving to the states it's not really comparable.

My goals do not involve money though. My ideal job is a cutting edge research project for whatever nominal fee they're willing to pay me.
 

rh71

No Lifer
Aug 28, 2001
52,856
1,048
126
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: Special K
It's up to each person to decide what is valuable in their life, and how hard they are willing to work and sacrifice to get it. Some people may be perfectly content with $100k/year or less. Happiness is a very subjective thing.

What is not OK is bitching about not making enough, yet not taking any active steps toward improving yourself.

Thank you for putting it in better words than I can.

Some people settle with their meager lives, some people want more out of life. Choose your path.
You can call it meager but between my wife and I we make enough to enjoy our life right now. The next step is a baby and having a comfortable schedule will make it very easy for me to take care of him/her. I'm fine where I am... if you call it settling, ok. I do plan on starting a business after the kids phase of my adult life and I have the networking in place already. Settling now does not mean my career path is done. Actually it means the pieces are falling right into place for me.

The point of what I originally said is that some people are just lucky (if you can call it that) to be in a financial firm and making a ton more because of that alone, not because of how hard they work or what they know. It's often-times the same exact work, without the same pay. I guess the only difference is that they get to be around money-grubbers all day. How's that for your "more out of life" ?
 

Mardeth

Platinum Member
Jul 24, 2002
2,609
0
0
Geez american labor is overpriced. My dad is CxO level director at company with sales of $100million+ and he barely makes more than 100k and thats only because he gets a nice 30% boost from the weak dollar :D. I bet he would make 300k+ in the US, I should talk about that to him :).

Imo no <25 (Im tempted to say 30 but I guess Im looking too much at our economy in comparison) year-old is worth 100k+ a year. Experience, network, connections are what matters and you dont get/have those so early in the game. There are exceptions but basically that could be a rule of thumb. Im talking outside the the top 5 most expensive citys...

Someone talked about education and how much that matters. I agree mostly, that connections etc matter the most in the long run but your degree is what gets you inside. The better yours is, the higher up you start. How far you get in the end is up to you. Varies hugely between fields thought.
 

BigToque

Lifer
Oct 10, 1999
11,700
0
76
The meaning of making "6 figures" varries wildly from city to city.

Where I live, a single person could live in the nicest houses in the city, drive an incredible car, have money to go on a sweet vacation every year, spend lots of money on toys and other needless junk and go out for lots of enterainment and dining on $40,000 after taxes. Assuming you lose 40%, and you round up, that's $60,000 before tax.
 

6000SUX

Golden Member
May 8, 2005
1,504
0
0
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: rh71
bah, finance industry... I'm so ridiculously jealous in some ways... my wife is in IT like me but she works for a financial firm. Her bonus this year was more than my bonus in 7 years total, and counting. I will never get to 6 figures at this job, but it's very comfortable here. Give and take I guess... I don't have the pressures or need to put in the hours.

So you've "settled" then.

This post is a wake-up call for all professionals that aren't at 100K by age 30.

YOU ARE NOT WORKING HARD ENOUGH NOR ARE YOU TRYING!

IT workers are not professionals. In addition, your idea doesn't agree with the real-world facts. It may take someone significantly longer than age 30 to become a brain surgeon making more than 100k, for instance, but I wouldn't make a blanket statement that all such people aren't trying hard enough.

 

6000SUX

Golden Member
May 8, 2005
1,504
0
0
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: 6000SUX


IT workers are not professionals.

Huh?

They're just as professional as any other person doing their job.

I said they were not professionals.

But that's wrong. How are they not professionals?

A decent first read on the topic from Wikipedia

The indicia of professional occupations include:
- wearing a uniform
- needing to pass certification to become licensed
- being able to lose one's license, and ability to work
- self-regulation by the profession (in granting licenses, delicensure, etc.)
- a body of professional standards which is mandatory, often appearing at least partly as an oath

Not all white-collar workers are professionals. You can call an IT worker a professional in the sense that anyone who works can do the same-- "I am a potato fry professional, currently working at McDonald's"-- but not in the sense that the word is used to distinguish professionals from non-professionals. So either it means something in the way it's used, or it doesn't and is hence misleading.

I would say that if one is an illegal drug-sales professional and cannot make 100k by age 30, one isn't trying hard enough.

So, in short, it's not wrong. Doctors are professionals; so are lawyers. IT workers are not, despite what they'd like to think. They are not a member of a profession in the true sense of the word, the only one that distinguishes it from other occupations. When one talks about a "professional building", what does one expect? A building full of doctors, therapists, etc.
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
1
0
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: 6000SUX


IT workers are not professionals.

Huh?

They're just as professional as any other person doing their job.

I said they were not professionals.

But that's wrong. How are they not professionals?

A decent first read on the topic from Wikipedia

The indicia of professional occupations include:
- wearing a uniform
- needing to pass certification to become licensed
- being able to lose one's license, and ability to work
- self-regulation by the profession (in granting licenses, delicensure, etc.)
- a body of professional standards which is mandatory, often appearing at least partly as an oath

Not all white-collar workers are professionals. You can call an IT worker a professional in the sense that anyone who works can do the same-- "I am a potato fry professional, currently working at McDonald's"-- but not in the sense that the word is used to distinguish professionals from non-professionals. So either it means something in the way it's used, or it doesn't and is hence misleading.

I would say that if one is an illegal drug-sales professional and cannot make 100k by age 30, one isn't trying hard enough.

So, in short, it's not wrong. Doctors are professionals; so are lawyers. IT workers are not, despite what they'd like to think. They are not a member of a profession in the true sense of the word, the only one that distinguishes it from other occupations. When one talks about a "professional building", what does one expect? A building full of doctors, therapists, etc.

You seem to be big on doctors and lawyers. So which one are you- a doctor, lawyer, or therapist?
 

6000SUX

Golden Member
May 8, 2005
1,504
0
0
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
You seem to be big on doctors and lawyers.

Nope, not big on anything but correctness. Remember this, from the post to which I replied:

Originally posted by: spidey07
This post is a wake-up call for all professionals that aren't at 100K by age 30. YOU ARE NOT WORKING HARD ENOUGH NOR ARE YOU TRYING!

See, I was just using it in the sense meant by spidey07. He or she could not have meant that all workers in all occupations not making 100k by age 30 aren't trying hard enough.
 

rh71

No Lifer
Aug 28, 2001
52,856
1,048
126
I'd like to see Spidey confirm that himself. I have a feeling he meant anyone with a degree and working full time.
 

jupiter57

Diamond Member
Nov 18, 2001
4,600
3
71
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: 6000SUX


IT workers are not professionals.

Huh?

They're just as professional as any other person doing their job.

I said they were not professionals.

But that's wrong. How are they not professionals?

A decent first read on the topic from Wikipedia

The indicia of professional occupations include:
- wearing a uniform
- needing to pass certification to become licensed
- being able to lose one's license, and ability to work
- self-regulation by the profession (in granting licenses, delicensure, etc.)
- a body of professional standards which is mandatory, often appearing at least partly as an oath

Not all white-collar workers are professionals. You can call an IT worker a professional in the sense that anyone who works can do the same-- "I am a potato fry professional, currently working at McDonald's"-- but not in the sense that the word is used to distinguish professionals from non-professionals. So either it means something in the way it's used, or it doesn't and is hence misleading.

I would say that if one is an illegal drug-sales professional and cannot make 100k by age 30, one isn't trying hard enough.

So, in short, it's not wrong. Doctors are professionals; so are lawyers. IT workers are not, despite what they'd like to think. They are not a member of a profession in the true sense of the word, the only one that distinguishes it from other occupations. When one talks about a "professional building", what does one expect? A building full of doctors, therapists, etc.

Ah yes, Wikipedia!

The know all, be all, end all compendium of knowledge.
After all, it IS written by the people who know the most about the subjects they choose to post.
:confused:
Next time doofus, try dictionary.com
 

her209

No Lifer
Oct 11, 2000
56,352
11
0
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
A decent first read on the topic from Wikipedia

The indicia of professional occupations include:
- wearing a uniform
- needing to pass certification to become licensed
- being able to lose one's license, and ability to work
- self-regulation by the profession (in granting licenses, delicensure, etc.)
- a body of professional standards which is mandatory, often appearing at least partly as an oath

Not all white-collar workers are professionals. You can call an IT worker a professional in the sense that anyone who works can do the same-- "I am a potato fry professional, currently working at McDonald's"-- but not in the sense that the word is used to distinguish professionals from non-professionals. So either it means something in the way it's used, or it doesn't and is hence misleading.

I would say that if one is an illegal drug-sales professional and cannot make 100k by age 30, one isn't trying hard enough.

So, in short, it's not wrong. Doctors are professionals; so are lawyers. IT workers are not, despite what they'd like to think. They are not a member of a profession in the true sense of the word, the only one that distinguishes it from other occupations. When one talks about a "professional building", what does one expect? A building full of doctors, therapists, etc.
What about a business executive?
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,469
5
76
Originally posted by: rh71
I'd like to see Spidey confirm that himself. I have a feeling he meant anyone with a degree and working full time.

I meant degreed and full time. By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate. But I've been a corporate boy for way too long and maybe have a warped sense of reality.

Most salary grades in a company are posted internally. Sr level staff positions were generally in the 80-120 range. This is STAFF level, not management. So by age 30 you should be in a Sr. staff position or already in management. This is in the mid-west, medium cost of living city.
 

6000SUX

Golden Member
May 8, 2005
1,504
0
0
Originally posted by: jupiter57
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: 6000SUX


IT workers are not professionals.

Huh?

They're just as professional as any other person doing their job.

I said they were not professionals.

But that's wrong. How are they not professionals?

A decent first read on the topic from Wikipedia

The indicia of professional occupations include:
- wearing a uniform
- needing to pass certification to become licensed
- being able to lose one's license, and ability to work
- self-regulation by the profession (in granting licenses, delicensure, etc.)
- a body of professional standards which is mandatory, often appearing at least partly as an oath

Not all white-collar workers are professionals. You can call an IT worker a professional in the sense that anyone who works can do the same-- "I am a potato fry professional, currently working at McDonald's"-- but not in the sense that the word is used to distinguish professionals from non-professionals. So either it means something in the way it's used, or it doesn't and is hence misleading.

I would say that if one is an illegal drug-sales professional and cannot make 100k by age 30, one isn't trying hard enough.

So, in short, it's not wrong. Doctors are professionals; so are lawyers. IT workers are not, despite what they'd like to think. They are not a member of a profession in the true sense of the word, the only one that distinguishes it from other occupations. When one talks about a "professional building", what does one expect? A building full of doctors, therapists, etc.

Ah yes, Wikipedia!

The know all, be all, end all compendium of knowledge.
After all, it IS written by the people who know the most about the subjects they choose to post.
:confused:
Next time doofus, try dictionary.com

Next time, doofus, try to think and read. No one claimed Wikipedia was the be-all, end-all compendium of knowledge. You don't know much about professions.
 

6000SUX

Golden Member
May 8, 2005
1,504
0
0
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: rh71
I'd like to see Spidey confirm that himself. I have a feeling he meant anyone with a degree and working full time.

I meant degreed and full time. By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate. But I've been a corporate boy for way too long and maybe have a warped sense of reality.

Most salary grades in a company are posted internally. Sr level staff positions were generally in the 80-120 range. This is STAFF level, not management. So by age 30 you should be in a Sr. staff position or already in management. This is in the mid-west, medium cost of living city.

I don't necessarily disbelieve, but I've worked at some awfully big companies and don't recall this sort of pay structure being the norm (IBM, Raytheon, Northeast Utilities among others). Where are you getting your figures?
 

6000SUX

Golden Member
May 8, 2005
1,504
0
0
Originally posted by: her209
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
A decent first read on the topic from Wikipedia

The indicia of professional occupations include:
- wearing a uniform
- needing to pass certification to become licensed
- being able to lose one's license, and ability to work
- self-regulation by the profession (in granting licenses, delicensure, etc.)
- a body of professional standards which is mandatory, often appearing at least partly as an oath

Not all white-collar workers are professionals. You can call an IT worker a professional in the sense that anyone who works can do the same-- "I am a potato fry professional, currently working at McDonald's"-- but not in the sense that the word is used to distinguish professionals from non-professionals. So either it means something in the way it's used, or it doesn't and is hence misleading.

I would say that if one is an illegal drug-sales professional and cannot make 100k by age 30, one isn't trying hard enough.

So, in short, it's not wrong. Doctors are professionals; so are lawyers. IT workers are not, despite what they'd like to think. They are not a member of a profession in the true sense of the word, the only one that distinguishes it from other occupations. When one talks about a "professional building", what does one expect? A building full of doctors, therapists, etc.
What about a business executive?

Strictly speaking, not professionals-- if the word means something. They may be professional and professionally acquit themselves, but they're not professionals. :)
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
1
0
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: rh71
I'd like to see Spidey confirm that himself. I have a feeling he meant anyone with a degree and working full time.

I meant degreed and full time. By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate. But I've been a corporate boy for way too long and maybe have a warped sense of reality.

Most salary grades in a company are posted internally. Sr level staff positions were generally in the 80-120 range. This is STAFF level, not management. So by age 30 you should be in a Sr. staff position or already in management. This is in the mid-west, medium cost of living city.

What if the person working full time has no degree? Surely it's strange to think that a degreed codemonkey in India working for Microsoft is a professional, yet Bill Gates isn't.
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,469
5
76
Originally posted by: 6000SUX
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: rh71
I'd like to see Spidey confirm that himself. I have a feeling he meant anyone with a degree and working full time.

I meant degreed and full time. By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate. But I've been a corporate boy for way too long and maybe have a warped sense of reality.

Most salary grades in a company are posted internally. Sr level staff positions were generally in the 80-120 range. This is STAFF level, not management. So by age 30 you should be in a Sr. staff position or already in management. This is in the mid-west, medium cost of living city.

I don't necessarily disbelieve, but I've worked at some awfully big companies and don't recall this sort of pay structure being the norm (IBM, Raytheon, Northeast Utilities among others). Where are you getting your figures?

Personal experience. Did you actually work for these companies or were you contract labor? In other words, who signed your check.

IBM - did you work for IBM or did you contract for IBM Global Services? Because even working for IBM Global means you should be above 100K if you are a pro. IBM pays very well.
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
1
0
Originally posted by: spidey07

IBM - did you work for IBM or did you contract for IBM Global Services? Because even working for IBM Global means you should be above 100K if you are a pro. IBM pays very well.

I've worked directly for IBM two times, and they don't pay very well. I don't know anyone in my department who made over 100k, other than the departmental manager. They have the reputation of being a good company, one which they earned long ago, but they're no longer a good company to work for. The running joke was that it stood for "I've Been Mislead"
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,469
5
76
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: rh71
I'd like to see Spidey confirm that himself. I have a feeling he meant anyone with a degree and working full time.

I meant degreed and full time. By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate. But I've been a corporate boy for way too long and maybe have a warped sense of reality.

Most salary grades in a company are posted internally. Sr level staff positions were generally in the 80-120 range. This is STAFF level, not management. So by age 30 you should be in a Sr. staff position or already in management. This is in the mid-west, medium cost of living city.

What if the person working full time has no degree? Surely it's strange to think that a degreed codemonkey in India working for Microsoft is a professional, yet Bill Gates isn't.

You know what a professional is.
 

91TTZ

Lifer
Jan 31, 2005
14,374
1
0
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: 91TTZ
Originally posted by: spidey07
Originally posted by: rh71
I'd like to see Spidey confirm that himself. I have a feeling he meant anyone with a degree and working full time.

I meant degreed and full time. By "professional" I mean you possess a degree and knowledge way above the layman or recent graduate. But I've been a corporate boy for way too long and maybe have a warped sense of reality.

Most salary grades in a company are posted internally. Sr level staff positions were generally in the 80-120 range. This is STAFF level, not management. So by age 30 you should be in a Sr. staff position or already in management. This is in the mid-west, medium cost of living city.

What if the person working full time has no degree? Surely it's strange to think that a degreed codemonkey in India working for Microsoft is a professional, yet Bill Gates isn't.

You know what a professional is.

I thought I did, but someone already shot that down in this thread.
 

Safeway

Lifer
Jun 22, 2004
12,081
9
81
I will make ~$100k once I graduate, first year. My girlfriend will make ~$115k once she graduates, first year. Booo-fvcking-urns.