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Felony charges for officers that destroyed video of misconduct

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Lithium381

Lifer
May 12, 2001
12,464
2
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I don't understand why police are so protected when the fsck up so bad. Their unions really work well for them. but unions notwithstanding the shizzle they get away is heinous!
 
Sep 7, 2009
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I don't understand why police are so protected when the fsck up so bad. Their unions really work well for them. but unions notwithstanding the shizzle they get away is heinous!

It's because they function exactly like gangs. They don't "roll" on each other, they protect each other at any cost to the end.

Almost any investigation into an officer is stalled and blocked by everyone inside the department. It's nearly impossible to get hard evidence.

One of the most disgusting things, to me, is how many departments have policy to roll over dashcam footage every 24 hours, yet it takes longer than 24 hours to get a court order to require them to hold it. As a result, if you need dashcam footage which incriminates an officer it will never be found.. Since it's "rolled over" (even though it's all digital)

Yet, if the dashcam footage exonerates a gang member in blue..... They can somehow go YEARS back and get the footage.

Our militarized LEO setups are some of the most corrupt organizations in place today.
 

Geosurface

Diamond Member
Mar 22, 2012
5,777
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Just watched the video.

Absolutely absurd number of police cruisers and officers show up, like roughly one million times how many were necessary. Especially given that nothing had happened.

The first guy was thrown to the ground at a time when he looked compliant. I agree that's inappropriate and then arresting his brother for just filming is also ridiculous. Destroying evidence is beyond ridiculous. The behavior of these cops here was certainly out of line.

But I will say this much in the other direction: there are some very rough parts of North Omaha and this looks like one of them. Cops are always on edge when they have to do anything in such areas, and with good reason. I wouldn't blame them for being concerned that while you're arresting one guy, his brother is just freely roaming around behind you and there are additional family inside a nearby house, of which you don't know the number. I disagree with their throwing the first guy to the ground, but given when the video starts it's hard to know if his behavior came anywhere close to justifying it. If they were simply asking why the cars were being towed, then of course not. If they were aggressive and overly confrontational, it may nudge us somewhat closer to understanding that initial takedown.

I can understand the cops not wanting to leave the brother behind their backs. Very easy to go from filming to shooting and they likely hadn't patted him down or anything. So an officer going to sort of put the brother on lockdown is not entirely unreasonable. That said, he had the right to film them. I do think it was not the most prudent thing for him to repeat the same shit a thousand times like "that's abuse, that's abuse, that's abuse, that's abuse, that's abuse" and he's screaming it, then switching to another phrase and saying it four thousand times. As I said, the cops are already on edge in such a neighborhood, now they've got someone making it hard to even think straight by filling the air with endless repetitive screaming. From their point of view, I could see how the situation felt like it was getting out of hand.

But I still obviously feel they were way out of line, and it seems to me based on the video that the whole thing should have been able to be resolved without them tackling or arresting either brother. Taking their camera phones is completely unacceptable.

I'm just saying I'm a little less eager to judge police who we ask to operate in some very dangerous areas around our country. I do think the way they need to operate in those neighborhoods is different than in others.
 

shortylickens

No Lifer
Jul 15, 2003
76,577
9,685
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good. Police need constant reminders they are servants of the public.
Not a private security force.
Not a gang.
And damn sure not strong arms for big brother.
 

nehalem256

Lifer
Apr 13, 2012
15,670
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Am I the only one to find it odd that not 1, not 2, but 3 people were all filming what was going on?
 

Geosurface

Diamond Member
Mar 22, 2012
5,777
3
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good. Police need constant reminders they are servants of the public.
Not a private security force.
Not a gang.
And damn sure not strong arms for big brother.
I agree, but would you agree that police are able to be more polite and friendly when citizens are that way too, and when they're in neighborhoods where they can be pretty much 100% certain that nobody is going to come out of another house shooting in solidarity?

Would you agree that certain areas require the police to adapt somewhat to the environment? And that maybe our laws don't do a very good job of accounting for that fact, which leads them to stretch those laws?

Am I the only one to find it odd that not 1, not 2, but 3 people were all filming what was going on?
It's our modern culture. But people sometimes forget that just being filmed, particularly when it's coupled with repetitive confrontational yelling where you're trying to convey to the officers that they're in deep shit, are inherently provocative moves.

Hell, look at Russell Crowe and other celebrities who haul off and punch paparazzi. People do not like being aggressively, confrontationally filmed. I understand why people film police sometimes to hold them accountable, and I agree this should be legal and I'm glad it is. But some people use this as a way to provoke police, like the guy whose rottweiler got shot. He was being VERY provocative in how he filmed police.

I do not condone how these officers acted, I merely find it easier to understand than a lot of people seem to.
 
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Matt1970

Lifer
Mar 19, 2007
12,321
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I see a guy complying with officers. That cop definitely used excessive force.
 
Sep 7, 2009
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I think that if you're a LEO, and cannot control your temper... Even in bad situations... That you should not be a cop. Yes, they're underpaid, yes it takes special people, but it is what it is.

These people losing their tempers... One day it could be on your family member, for something simple. Many of them are ready to snap at a moment's notice.
 

Geosurface

Diamond Member
Mar 22, 2012
5,777
3
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I think that if you're a LEO, and cannot control your temper... Even in bad situations... That you should not be a cop.

Many of them are ready to snap at a moment's notice.
I agree. Which is why I consider it very wise whenever police are interacting with me (which is exceptionally rare) to be very polite and compliant. If I feel the officer is violating my rights in some way, I would take that up with someone above him in the chain of command at a later time rather than confronting him about it during the event, directly.

I'm not saying the consequence of NOT being prudent like that should be getting brutally beaten or arrested for no reason, I'm just saying there is in fact a connection between people not being prudent like that when the cops are interacting with them, and what ends up happening to them.
 
Sep 7, 2009
12,960
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I agree. Which is why I consider it very wise whenever police are interacting with me (which is exceptionally rare) to be very polite and compliant. If I feel the officer is violating my rights in some way, I would take that up with someone above him in the chain of command at a later time rather than confronting him about it during the event, directly.

I'm not saying the consequence of NOT being prudent like that should be getting brutally beaten or arrested for no reason, I'm just saying there is in fact a connection between people not being prudent like that when the cops are interacting with them, and what ends up happening to them.

I know traffic/municipal law extremely well, and I can afford to hire an attorney to deal with problematic situations. And even I have been in a situation where a crooked cop blatantly abused his power...

I requested a supervising officer after he lost his mind over me not allowing him to search my car and things got very nasty. He went so far as to physically threaten me, threatened to make sure the car is damaged "when" it is impounded and searched if I don't allow him to search it. etc etc etc. This was in texas on I10 (known drug trafficking area), on the way back from vegas, around 4am in a nice car with no plates (but legal, insured, and paid for).

I was polite, respectful, but would not consent to a search which caused him to completely blow his top. Trust me, I know all about illegal detainment, time limits, and he could not have cared less about how illegal the entire thing was. I held my ground and refused the search, after about an hour of him screaming and slamming his fists on the car, and doing an illegal search anyway (he claimed to only search within immediate reach but searched the trunk as well) he let us on our way. His badge pocket was folded up and covered, he refused to give his name, and honestly I wasn't convinced he was a cop until I heard his radio sqawking.

After that incident I've started secretly recording every interaction I have with LEOs and I now use a dashcam.
 

Jimzz

Diamond Member
Oct 23, 2012
4,345
137
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I don't understand why police are so protected when the fsck up so bad. Their unions really work well for them. but unions notwithstanding the shizzle they get away is heinous!

Its not the union but the name/badge. The military does a lot of crazy shit as well but what politician gets elected coming out again police, military, etc...
 
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