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Question Failed SSD, is there a way to recover data without professional help in these conditions?

M4JKsvk

Junior Member
Aug 17, 2020
2
0
6
My laptop Lenovo Flex 4 died probably of SSD failure - showing I/O error on boot up (sorry I don't remember the error number). I wanted to save my data, but recovery service where I live is super expensive so I wanted to try what I can do myself first. I extracted SSD from my laptop and plugged it in disk enclosure (ELUTENG HDD/SSD External Case). After I plug in the case with SSD to the USB port on my working laptop, disk shows up with error message "Location is not available E:\ is not accessible. A device which does not exist was specified." and after clicking on OK disk disappears and is not visible in Device manager or Disk management. From this point, is there anything I can do to recover data by myself or is service the only option?

SSD: LITE-ON model CV3-DE256
Using Win10
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
13,496
4,136
146
You can try to run a utility like CrystalDiskInfo to see the drive's health (if it can see it at all).

But if the SSD is truly dead, you would likely have to send it to a data retrieval company to see if anything can be salvaged. SSDs are trickier compared to regular hard drives when it comes to recoverable data, so depending on what is wrong with the drive, they might not be able to save anything for you.

Not singling you out, but this sort of thing is why we always emphasize backups (both local and cloud based) with data a person can't afford to lose. We've seen numerous people over the years sign up here in the exact same situation. Their HDD/SSD died, and they really need data off of it.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
49,232
5,468
126
Not singling you out, but this sort of thing is why we always emphasize backups (both local and cloud based) with data a person can't afford to lose. We've seen numerous people over the years sign up here in the exact same situation. Their HDD/SSD died, and they really need data off of it.
Yep. Sorry for your loss. If the laptop is not "on the road" ALL of the time (you bring it home at night), consider getting a small NAS unit, that connects wired to your wifi router using ethernet, and then setting up a "backup" account and share on the NAS, and then install Macrium Reflect Free on your laptop (once you get a new SSD and re-install Windows onto it), and it can schedule backups daily, weekly, whatever, to the NAS. Make sure to make the bootable USB recovery stick too, for bare-metal recovery. It boots to a Windows PE environment, and will allow you to recover from your NAS as well, back to the laptop.

Once you get it set up and installed, it's very much "set and forget", until such time as you might need a recovery. (I DO recommend opening the Macrium Reflect Free program, and keeping it updated, and checking the "log" tab, it will show a red "X", or a green "circle", if the backup scheduled on that date failed or succeeded. If many are failing, you might need to change the schedule, reboot the NAS, or make sure that permissions and accounts on the NAS are set up properly.)

For NAS units, I recommend QNAP, and then Asustor. (I've had some flaky issues with Asustor interacting with Macrium Reflect Free, sometimes it won't find the share, or the account to login, etc.)
 

M4JKsvk

Junior Member
Aug 17, 2020
2
0
6
Thank you guys for the answers, I tried CrystalDiskInfo and HDDScan and they are not recognizing the SSD so I'm giving up I guess.
 

MalVeauX

Senior member
Dec 19, 2008
342
16
81
Thank you guys for the answers, I tried CrystalDiskInfo and HDDScan and they are not recognizing the SSD so I'm giving up I guess.
Hi,

What all have you tried? The enclosure will help you get access to it, but that doesn't mean it will just be accessible to another system. If the boot record is messed up or volume is messed up some how, this can make it seem like an empty or useless drive.

Assuming Windows here, go to your Control Panel -> System & Security -> Administrative Tools -> Computer Management with the drive plugged in and powered on in your enclosure. Then on the left pane of the window, look at Disk Management under storage. Be careful what you do in there, but just look around for a volume or attached disc that has or does not have a file system and look at the status. Below in the middle, you will see all attached devices and their volumes/partitions and some information. See if the SSD is at least showing up as a device there, regardless of having a volume. It may not initialize and you'll have to do that (just be mindful not to delete a volume or make a new volume; just initialize it and assign it a drive letter only).

Not to kick you while down, as others mentioned, this will be a good time to start taking the idea of backups seriously so that you can avoid this in the future. But don't lose hope, the data is there, the tables of where it is and what it is might simply be messed up.

Very best,
 

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