Dust Filters For Computer(s)

Baasha

Golden Member
Jan 4, 2010
1,963
3
81
#1
Guys,

I want to get some dust filters for my PC as the constant need to clean the dust in many nooks and crannies on my system is a real PITA.

First, what kind of dust filters are sold for PC's? And, which ones do you guys recommend?

I saw dust filters being offered by Digital Storm for their builds but I don't need a new computer now so I'd like to know where I can get them.

I also feel that the dust is clogging up my system and affecting airflow significantly. So dust filters are a must and I want to get them ASAP.

Thanks in advance.
 

HeXen

Diamond Member
Dec 13, 2009
7,780
9
91
#2
http://tinyurl.com/ycd9hns

Did u really need to do this?
Im pretty sure he did google it and wanted first hand advice and not something from google.
If you dont have anything productive to add, just dont post.
You have been given a soft warning.

Moderator Aigo
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Sep 21, 2002
64,841
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91
#3
you can, but you have to realize computer fans are horrible at fighting back pressure, so only coarse fan filters work without totally destroying air flow, so you end up with powder dust in the case. sorta inevitable.
 
Dec 4, 2009
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#4
Good question, ive been wondering the same. Some of those links on the google search arent the best, does anyone have any experience with this. Thanks.
 
Feb 22, 2007
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#5
Go to a hardware store and ask for the cut to fit air conditioner filters like these:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...09ADDTQNNE72T0

It is really thin stuff , less than 1/4 inch thick, not too coarse and not too fine. Works for a long time without clogging up.

You can cut it with scissors to the size you need.
 
Last edited:

PsiStar

Golden Member
Dec 21, 2005
1,184
0
76
#6
I have been using a Scotch Brite open weave stiff scrubbing cloth ... looks like something that could almost substitute for window screen with a little finer weave. I am sure that I got a pack of them at HomeDepot or Lowes.
 

Baasha

Golden Member
Jan 4, 2010
1,963
3
81
#7
I have been using a Scotch Brite open weave stiff scrubbing cloth ... looks like something that could almost substitute for window screen with a little finer weave. I am sure that I got a pack of them at HomeDepot or Lowes.
How to do you actually "mount" it or make it cover the openings? I have the Antec 902 so it comes with the Fan filters for the front two "intake" fans. But the big fan on the top, the vent on the side, and the two fans in the rear (all except side vent are exhaust fans I believe) are clogged with dust!! Even the CPU cooler (Xigmatek Dark Knight), I can see dust in the crevices of the metal. I used a Swiffer to wipe all of it off only to have that sh!t clog up in two days!

I'm sick of the dust! I swear I want to smash the thing with a baseball bat. Except, the dust will escape and my PC will be smashed! :(
 
May 24, 2003
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www.uovalor.com
#8
Eventually when I build my server rack I want to incorporate a filtering system which will use hepa furnace filters (or maybe just regular filters, need to do more research). Basically it will be a fully enclosed rack with a single intake that has a blower and filter to it and an exhaust. I may hook said exhaust to the return of the furnace, in which case I won't need my own blower. May as well recycle the heat I'm producing too.
 
Nov 6, 2009
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#9
Dudes,

I share your pain!
After 20 some years maintaining PCs, there has got to be a better way than scheduling downtime every few months and getting out the vacuum cleaner.

I recently found some threads on SilentPCReview that discussed some promising techniques. Search for threads on "positive pressure"

http://www.silentpcreview.com/forums/viewforum.php?f=15&sid=13ae3f81579711879a6137a96f6d3245

Basically you make a long narrow box with a couple of fans and use something like a furnace HEPA filter to provide all the cooling air from outside the case. When the pressure inside the case is greater than outside, the case no longer pulls in dust through every available tiny opening. You just vacuum the filter periodically. No downtime.

I am planning to do this for my current upgrade project.
Ping me if you need more details.

-joe
 
Feb 22, 2007
16,243
0
76
#11
How to do you actually "mount" it or make it cover the openings? I have the Antec 902 so it comes with the Fan filters for the front two "intake" fans. But the big fan on the top, the vent on the side, and the two fans in the rear (all except side vent are exhaust fans I believe) are clogged with dust!! Even the CPU cooler (Xigmatek Dark Knight), I can see dust in the crevices of the metal. I used a Swiffer to wipe all of it off only to have that sh!t clog up in two days!

I'm sick of the dust! I swear I want to smash the thing with a baseball bat. Except, the dust will escape and my PC will be smashed! :(
Get the velcro adhesive strips and use them to attach the filter. You might have to use a hot glue gun to get the adhesive strip to stick to the filter material. It works well. You just pull off the filter and wash it out, dry it and re-attach. About $5 will do an entire case for the filter I used above and the velcro.

I have also used fabric softener dryer sheets. Just unfold and place over an intake and it will stick all by itself from the suction. Also fills the room with spring breeze scent !
 

fluffmonster

Senior member
Sep 29, 2006
209
0
81
#12
I prefer than thin air-conditioner filter stuff. Sometimes i just masking tape the filter on, particularly covering vents on the sidepanel. I've also used needle and thread, sew the filter on.

For the Antec 902, the top is outflow and shouldn't need any filter at all. There's a filter on the sidepanel, you just pull it out, wash, remount. Don't forget the back...the little pci slot covers are basically totally open and a prime entry-point for dust. However, if you have major dust problems on the inside of this case then the problem is not the case. It could be the environment is dusty, like if you have it sitting directly on a carpet. it could also be that the fans are on too high...high speed settings don't seem to improve cooling much, but do add noise and dustflow.

Maybe a pic to get a visual of your case's filthy innards?
 

Dark Shroud

Golden Member
Mar 26, 2010
1,576
0
0
#13
I'm going to try a few of these methods. The one real complaint I have with the HAF 932 is the lack of air filters. I hate bottom mounting for PSUs if the PC has to be on the floor.
 

thescreensavers

Diamond Member
Aug 3, 2005
9,930
0
81
#14
lol, meh I had filters on my Thermal take case, came with them killed airflow, I kept the front ones on and they did get dirty. But I would check them like every other month.
 

georgi984

Junior Member
Apr 7, 2010
10
0
0
#15
Hello all.
I just couldn't believe no one mention the Anion Generator's!
The only my excellent compatriot's i can think of are the low frequency noise it emits
and the minor power usage. But the +'s are soo many that you
can't ignore it.
Here's the link to the case i'm using:
http://www.spirecoolers.com/main/product_detail.asp?ProdID=529
But i think you can add it in just any other case!
go google "Anion Generator" and read for yourself

bye
 

beginner99

Diamond Member
Jun 2, 2009
4,155
218
126
#16
Don't laugh but I use a "mosquite net" for filtering. You can buy that for like 2 $. I don't mean a real one but those simple one you can cut in shape for your needs (door, window,...). The come with "velcro-tape". So easy attachment and removal for cleaning. Of course you only catch the larger particles but it does help. I would sa you can easly run your pc couple of years without undusting (assuming it's not standing on the floor or an extremely dusty environment).

Yeah, worst thing is putting the case on the floor directly just 10 cm above it and you eliminate like 90% of the dust. Some desk actually have an optional attachment thing whre you can place your pc. does excatly this pretty. nice IMHO.

http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/615/706/200/IKea1.jpg

simething like this (mine is better it's on the outside of the desk so I have space for my legs...
 
Jun 30, 2004
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#19
I had collected some pictures to post a thread on my "non-destructive" mods to a Coolermaster Stacker 830 case. Some of the DIY efforts of Anandtech modders some 10 years past meet with less enthusiasm lately, because case-makers have passed on innovations to users that might seem to make personal efforts less necessary and more likely something you can pay for.

Moreover, working with the materials I've found to be useful for ducting and filtering can seem like kindergarten finger-paint and construction-paper projects.

The Stacker was built with ventilation in mind:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811119122

http://www.coolermaster.com/service/support/model/RC-830/

It is probably no longer possible to obtain a Stacker, and newer case designs prevail today. I'm simply trying to get extended use from the one I have. And I'm providing this information below simply to demonstrate what can be done for ducting and filtering.

It has a plastic door on a spring-loaded hinge inside the left side-panel which accommodates up to four 140mm or 120mm fans. You could even mod this door with Lexan/Plexi pieces to accommodate a single 200mm fan, but you would irreversibly change the door in the process. You can, however, block off quadrants of the door with square Lexan plates with holes drilled to the 140mm fan-spec. Here's a photo taken with my array of case and ducting parts:



But the Stacker never offered much in the way of fan-filtering. DEMCiFlex offers a single, large magnetic filter that fits the side-panel exterior for some $50+. If you only have two fans installed in the inner plastic door as I do, you can get a DEMCiFlex generic 2x140 rectangular filter for about ~$25 and apply it directly to the hinged door:



For ducting a heatpipe cooler to rear exhaust, you can either build your own duct as I'd shown in some much older thread, or find a $6 solution in the ThermalRight accordion ducts sold as accessory to TR coolers. The "blue-rubber-ductie" is a perfect fit for a Hyper 212 EVO, and can be made to fit several other tower heatpipes as well:

http://www.sidewindercomputers.com/th12fandubl.html

The front-panel of the Stacker is covered with a hinged door which is also vented -- shown in the open position on the right side of this photo:



Note that the metal vents for the mostly-aluminum Stacker are made from perf-steel: this provides better shielding for electronic parts. But the holes in these perf-steel vents -- while catching a lot of dust over time -- are not effective filters for the finer stuff.

The drive cages behind the front door and within the chassis of the Stacker include fittings for 120mm fans, but no filters. I was able to fit 140mm fans to the cages with rubber fan-mounts and 140-to-120 plastic adapters. But how would you filter them?

Since appearances aren't as important behind the front door, I built a frame [shown above] to make an interference fit with the two fan shrouds. It uses three layers of laminated foam-art-board, and I resurrected the wire-screen filters from HAF 932 cases sandwiched between the layers. [The HAF 932 got custom DEMCiFlex filters, so these wire screens were discards].

Finally, the Stacker provides mountings for a 13"x2"x2" CM barrel fan called the "Cross-flow." My Stacker had already been fitted with the barrel fan -- reversed to exhaust air off the motherboard and out the right side-panel. I simply chose to leave it in place, and ducted the motherboard with Lexan so that the CF fan draws air across the motherboard. Here, the Lexan duct is installed, and you can hardly see it. The CF fan sits just to the right of the motherboard forward-edge:



The problem here: CM apparently didn't anticipate the size of today's graphics cards, which would interfere with the fan itself. If I want to install graphics cards in this Stacker case, I'll either need to think of another way to duct motherboard air and eliminate the barrel fan, or use mini ITX graphics cards, such as the GTX 1060 introduced recently:

https://www.amazon.com/EVGA-GeForce...&qid=1471802336&sr=8-2&keywords=gtx+1060+mini

Unfortunately, I'll have to wait for a GTX 1070 mini-card if I want 2x SLI graphics in this configuration.

The barrel fan draws about 80% of its air from the top of the motherboard, and about 20% from underneath. The motherboard pan is ventilated with 1cm-diameter holes. Since these holes would effectively be an intake channel, I decided to filter them as well:



Here's where I took a cue from DEMCiFlex, with their use of magnetic tape and filters:



Note that I also installed a foam-board rectangular, easy-to-remove baffle to seal the gap between the motherboard pan and the vertical drive cage, with a small hole for SATA wires.

The DEMCiFlex filters use a medical-grade mesh screen material, which can be purchased separately. So you can buy yourself a role of 2mm-thick magnetic tape at Home-Depot for ~$4, use foam-board to build filter-frames for some given situation, and make your own easily-removable filters.

Generally, there are two types of glue which work with foam-board:

Beacon Hold-the-Foam, which is a water-based non-toxic glue for styrofoam which will also bond foam to wood, paper and plastic, and --
ZAP Foam-Safe CA , which can bond foam-board to paper, wood, Lexan or Plexi.

A set of small quick-release clamps is useful for working with these materials.

So I provide this summary -- not to show what a great production I've made with an old Stacker 830 -- but to suggest ideas you might find useful in your own ducting and filtering project.

You can find either custom or generic filters made by DEMCiFlex, and if you can't find a custom filter for your case, those made for a different case may fit, or take a look at the generic filter offerings. And if you need to, you can manufacture your own magnetic filters.

As for appearances, foam board can be filled with a paper-mache product or the Beacon glue, and it can be painted to a high-gloss finish with acrylic enamel.
 
Dec 3, 2010
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#20
The DEMCiFlex filters use a medical-grade mesh screen material, which can be purchased separately.
From where? A search on Google shows this place which sells some really fine stainless steel mesh, but it's probably not much less than just purchasing something directly from DEMCiFlex themselves.

I was just about to buy some DEMCiFlex filters the other day when I talked myself out of it due to the cost, and figured I'd just go the pantyhose route for now (for custom sized fan filters) to see how that worked out.
 

Micrornd

Senior member
Mar 2, 2013
772
22
91
#21
I purchased my filters direct from DEMCiFlex. Found that to be the best pricing (even with the shipping cost from S.A.)
Plus they are happy to talk to you and will custom make any size or shape you want at a reasonable price.
 
Jun 30, 2004
13,789
282
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#22
From where? A search on Google shows this place which sells some really fine stainless steel mesh, but it's probably not much less than just purchasing something directly from DEMCiFlex themselves.

I was just about to buy some DEMCiFlex filters the other day when I talked myself out of it due to the cost, and figured I'd just go the pantyhose route for now (for custom sized fan filters) to see how that worked out.
I did a quick google and found this page:

http://www.surgicalmesh.com/pet_mesh.htm

The DEMCiFlex products don't use a steel screen mesh, but rather something like a polyester weave. The HAF screens I used for my mobo-pan filter are steel or metal.

However, I give you (where are the thumbs? The icons?) two thumbs up on the panty-hose idea, and I can see how one might use it to make a filter as I'd shown on my motherboard pan. You'd probably want to staple it in place and then glue it, or simply stretch it out flat and work with it that way.

NO doubt the DEMCiFlex items are pricey, and it was easier for me to buy them sparingly for my HAF 932's because they were custom-made for the case. But about 4 sq. yards of black foam-board might cost you $16, the roll of mag tape around $4, and a bottle of Beacon Foam-Safe is around $8. A person could go into business for himself!

Then it's just a matter of acquiring the panty-hose. You shouldn't need to raid the girls' dorm to do that.
 

ClockHound

Golden Member
Nov 27, 2007
1,030
47
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#23
I did a quick google and found this page:

http://www.surgicalmesh.com/pet_mesh.htm

The DEMCiFlex products don't use a steel screen mesh, but rather something like a polyester weave. The HAF screens I used for my mobo-pan filter are steel or metal.

However, I give you (where are the thumbs? The icons?) two thumbs up on the panty-hose idea, and I can see how one might use it to make a filter as I'd shown on my motherboard pan. You'd probably want to staple it in place and then glue it, or simply stretch it out flat and work with it that way.

NO doubt the DEMCiFlex items are pricey, and it was easier for me to buy them sparingly for my HAF 932's because they were custom-made for the case. But about 4 sq. yards of black foam-board might cost you $16, the roll of mag tape around $4, and a bottle of Beacon Foam-Safe is around $8. A person could go into business for himself!

Then it's just a matter of acquiring the panty-hose. You shouldn't need to raid the girls' dorm to do that.
I was with you right up to the last sentence. Just took the DIY fun out of it right there. ;-)

My preferred DIY filtering is modding woven poly furnace or AC filters. Less restrictive than the Demciflex style. While the cheapest, it's not nearly as exciting as the material acquisition method that you've already ruled as non-essential.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
17,294
93
126
#24
i have also tried to rebuild a DEMCi filter and well, it wasn't easy.

your seriously just better off getting them from PPC.
 
Jun 30, 2004
13,789
282
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#25
i have also tried to rebuild a DEMCi filter and well, it wasn't easy.

your seriously just better off getting them from PPC.
Well, there's "rebuilding" a DEMCiFlex filter, and there's simply "building" one. The mother-board pan filter in one of my posted photos was easy:



I think it took me a half-hour with an Xacto knife, and another hour waiting for the glue to set.

The front-panel filter took more time. But you couldn't just buy a filter for those two Akasa Viper yellow-blades, unless you found a generic shape that would adhere to the front-panel hinged door. If there were a DEMCiFlex item that would match that fan-deployment, you'd have to figure out a way to make the magnetic tape adhere either to the fans or the metal around them. All in all, it was a custom adaptation to a custom use of the fans. If, for instance, I chose to fit a Swiftech H240 X2 or an EKWB P280 (kit) radiator in the front, it might still protrude from the drive cage like the two Akasa fans, but there wouldn't be a gap between the fans and I'd have to either mod the existing filter or build a new one.

But the approach of mounting the radiator and fans that way -- leaving more room for HDDs or SSDs behind the radiator -- is a favored option for me with that case.
 

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