"Dude, You're Gettin' a Dell" campaign and advertising in McDonald's "I'm Lovin' It" Exec commits suicide

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HammerCurl

Senior member
Apr 3, 2007
651
0
0
Originally posted by: Geekbabe
Originally posted by: RagingBITCH
His wife's comments sure make it sound like she's glad he's gone...or something.
Many creative people are tormented by mental illness, this man might have suffered for years.
Damn, looks like I should've gone the creative career path...


back to accounting :(:brokenheart:
 

JulesMaximus

No Lifer
Jul 3, 2003
74,442
824
126
Originally posted by: Red Dawn
Originally posted by: moshquerade
Obituaries | Paul L. Tilley: 1967 - 2008
Top Chicago ad exec Paul Tilley, 40, dies apparently of suicide
DDB creative executive who oversaw marquee accounts such as Dell, McDonald's

February 26, 2008

As the top creative executive at advertising agency DDB's Chicago office, Paul L. Tilley oversaw commercials and campaigns for marquee clients such as Budweiser and McDonald's.

Mr. Tilley was named managing director of creative at DDB in September 2006, nine years after he joined the shop. Over those years, he led creative teams that came up with Dell's "Dude, You're Gettin' a Dell" campaign and advertising in McDonald's "I'm Lovin' It" effort.

Mr. Tilley, 40, died on Friday, Feb. 22. The Wilmette resident apparently jumped from an upper floor of the Fairmont Chicago Hotel Friday, and his death was ruled a suicide by the Cook County medical examiner's office.

"Life is complicated, and Paul was a complicated man," said Mr. Tilley's wife, Cristina.

Mr. Tilley grew up in Austin, Texas.

At Northwestern University, Mr. Tilley studied journalism and played bass guitar in a band called Scuttlebutt. Upon graduation, he worked in the marketing department at LaSalle Bank writing brochures and speeches.

"I think he always wanted to be in advertising," his wife said. "He loved words, and he loved wordplay. The thing he loved about advertising was that it involved words in the service of an idea."

A copywriting job followed at Tassani Communications. Mr. Tilley's print work for American Express gained notice and he moved on to J. Walter Thompson, working as a creative director. Over the years, he won a slew of industry awards for his work.

"Paul was a mentor to many, a friend to all," said Rick Carpenter, DDB Chicago's chief executive officer, in a statement. "His ability to lead, inspire, and yes, entertain will be so greatly missed."

Mr. Tilley is also survived by two daughters, Caroline and Margaret; his mother, Diana Stallings Tilley; and a sister, Elizabeth Smith.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/...6feb26,1,2832015.story
Probably needed some Anti depressants.:shocked:
No kidding...:shocked:
 

PHiuR

Diamond Member
Apr 24, 2001
9,540
2
76
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
Originally posted by: pulse8
Originally posted by: ahurtt
Originally posted by: moshquerade
Originally posted by: Modeps
Sad that he's dead, but he clearly had no talent.
sure, kick a man when he's down... oh wait....

he definitely had talent and success. who doesn't know those buzz phrases?
So I guess you probably think William Hung has talent too then by your definition. . .(he was the horrible singing spastic Asian guy from American Idol tryouts who went on to make some truly horrible novelty CD recordings).

Success maybe. . .talent, no. But that kind of success is the kind I think I can live without. I'd rather be noted for how good I am at something, not how laughably bad I am at it.
You obviously have no idea what the goal of advertising is.
It is to get people to buy a firm's products, among other things.

At least for me, "I'm Lovin' It" and "Dude, you got a Dell" were real failures. Every time I hear the I'm Lovin' It thing I have a strong desire to eat anywhere BUT McDonald's. The Dell thing back in the day *shakes head* They're just too flippin' stupid.

That's just you...

Everytime someone says "I'm Loving it", I think about Mcdonalds because of their commercials. Even if I don't want to eat, I still think about Mcdonalds with that line. So therefore simply by engraving that into my head it will come back to me to know about Mcdonalds.

Just like when I see yellow and red, I think of Mcdonalds.
 

ahurtt

Diamond Member
Feb 1, 2001
4,283
0
0
Originally posted by: PHiuR
Originally posted by: fuzzybabybunny
Originally posted by: pulse8
Originally posted by: ahurtt
Originally posted by: moshquerade
Originally posted by: Modeps
Sad that he's dead, but he clearly had no talent.
sure, kick a man when he's down... oh wait....

he definitely had talent and success. who doesn't know those buzz phrases?
So I guess you probably think William Hung has talent too then by your definition. . .(he was the horrible singing spastic Asian guy from American Idol tryouts who went on to make some truly horrible novelty CD recordings).

Success maybe. . .talent, no. But that kind of success is the kind I think I can live without. I'd rather be noted for how good I am at something, not how laughably bad I am at it.
You obviously have no idea what the goal of advertising is.
It is to get people to buy a firm's products, among other things.

At least for me, "I'm Lovin' It" and "Dude, you got a Dell" were real failures. Every time I hear the I'm Lovin' It thing I have a strong desire to eat anywhere BUT McDonald's. The Dell thing back in the day *shakes head* They're just too flippin' stupid.

That's just you...

Everytime someone says "I'm Loving it", I think about Mcdonalds because of their commercials. Even if I don't want to eat, I still think about Mcdonalds with that line. So therefore simply by engraving that into my head it will come back to me to know about Mcdonalds.

Just like when I see yellow and red, I think of Mcdonalds.
That's just because you saw the McDonald's commercial or ads and heard or read the phrase "I'm lovin' it" in association with McDonald's so many times. . .it's by repetition that you came to learn that association. Not because it was a "good" ad. If the phrase "horse poop on a waterlogged stick" had been associated with McDonald's enough times in your mind, then you'd be thinking of McDonald's every time somebody mentioned horse poop on a waterlogged stick. (I know I think of McDonald's whenever somebody mentions horse poop but that's just me. . .)

There was absolutely nothing genius or particularly creative about "I'm lovin' it."
 

Perknose

Forum Director & Omnipotent Overlord
Forum Director
Oct 9, 1999
44,795
5,336
136
Originally posted by: moshquerade
...whether you like what he created or not it still got people interested in the products...
Maybe so, but he was no Joseph Goebbels. People still buy into those shiny jackboots and stiff arm salute today!

That Swastika is one enduring brand!

Why, everytime I hear the Horst Wessel song . . .


 

MaxDepth

Diamond Member
Jun 12, 2001
8,758
43
91
Yeah, prett cryptic. Sounds like she expected him to do something like that. Or, that he had a share of demons that she probably saw too.

Originally posted by: RagingBITCH
His wife's comments sure make it sound like she's glad he's gone...or something.
 

Modeps

Lifer
Oct 24, 2000
17,177
1
0
Originally posted by: fisher
Originally posted by: Modeps
Originally posted by: moshquerade
Originally posted by: Modeps
Sad that he's dead, but he clearly had no talent.
sure, kick a man when he's down... oh wait....

he definitely had talent and success. who doesn't know those buzz phrases?
Success and talent do not have to go hand in hand... in this case, he was successful at being annoying.
how many stupid commercials do you see in a day? how many do you remember?

to become legend (good or bad) takes talent, not just luck.
So you're saying that the "I'm into nuggest yall" guys were just really talented?
 

Josh

Lifer
Mar 20, 2000
10,924
0
0
Originally posted by: MaxDepth
Yeah, prett cryptic. Sounds like she expected him to do something like that. Or, that he had a share of demons that she probably saw too.

Originally posted by: RagingBITCH
His wife's comments sure make it sound like she's glad he's gone...or something.
Hell yea..."Life is complicated, and Paul was a complicated man," said Mr. Tilley's wife, Cristina. "...wtf kind of sympathy is that. Detectives better go back and check our his life insurance policy, etc..
 

alkemyst

No Lifer
Feb 13, 2001
83,967
18
81
Originally posted by: Modeps
Originally posted by: moshquerade
Originally posted by: Modeps
Sad that he's dead, but he clearly had no talent.
sure, kick a man when he's down... oh wait....

he definitely had talent and success. who doesn't know those buzz phrases?
Success and talent do not have to go hand in hand... in this case, he was successful at being annoying.
The irony is fantastic.
 

Gibson486

Lifer
Aug 9, 2000
18,378
1
0
Originally posted by: Modeps
Sad that he's dead, but he clearly had no talent.
wow....his proof is right there. You one of those people that always try to back up lies even when loads of info come out that prove other wise?
 
Mar 10, 2005
14,647
2
0
talent, my ass. "wtf repost lol" could be more successful than either of those campaigns if it's spammed enough. maybe with a person dancing in black silhouette against a vibrant monochrome background.
 

JS80

Lifer
Oct 24, 2005
26,264
4
81
Whoa I stayed at that hotel last month.

Sounds fishy, especially his wife's comment. I'm guessing he went to Thailand and got caught with little boys.
 

thomsbrain

Lifer
Dec 4, 2001
18,148
1
0
As much as we all love to hate those commercials, those companies are still selling a crapload of hamburgers and computers.
 

m1ldslide1

Platinum Member
Feb 20, 2006
2,321
0
0
Although I'd never wish harm on somebody like this, that mcdonald's jingle is just about the most aesthetically offensive thing I've ever heard. How anybody can hear it and not get nails-on-a-chalkboard shivers is beyond me. And my revulsion was automatic - this isn't a cumulative effect. It's added another dimension to the reasons I won't eat at McDonald's.

Obviously someone will take his place and new heights of assininity in advertising will be achieved.
 

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