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Discussion Dr. Fauci was just asked the question on CNN....

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Zorba

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 1999
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ahahahhahahaaaaaa..ok...wishful thinking.....
Or you know, reading what experts are saying instead of going into a hysteria. They've pulled antibodies from SARS patiants in the last month. That was 17 years ago.
 
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JEDIYoda

Lifer
Jul 13, 2005
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Or you know, reading what experts are saying instead of going into a hysteria. They've pulled antibodies from SARS patiants in the last month. That was 17 years ago.
The problem is it seems just when somebody says- oh we have this figured out...BLAMMO!! Another strain developes! Sure you would think if you get it once that you would have an immuniy towards getting it again! But don`t count your chickens....
 

Starbuck1975

Lifer
Jan 6, 2005
14,604
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I would like to know why there isn't any real discussion about short cutting the vaccine trails. Why not got straight from phase 1 to phase 3. It seems like the risk benefit analysis definitely falls on the benefit side here, especially when you already have basic safety data from phase 1.

I do have a feeling there will be fairly widespread emergency useage while phase 3 is ongoing.
There were a few articles the other day that Fauci is negotiating with a few vaccine manufacturers such that they’re ramping up production capability or the vaccines under trial so that there is no delay to production should a viable option emerge.
 

MtnMan

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2004
4,957
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As I see it, everything will depend on the nature and quality of any vaccine that will be created. Polio used to terrify people.

There is also this: https://elifesciences.org/digests/45393/how-do-bacteria-defend-themselves-against-viruses?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIvJjsmM7L6AIVDtVkCh2ncQp-EAAYAiAAEgIv8PD_BwE
Polio, also known as infantile paralysis, terrified people because children were the primary victim. If children were the must vulnerable to COVID-19 they you can bet your ass people would be taking it a whole lot more seriously, instead of throwing grandma and grandpa under the bus while we party.

Yes, I remember the polio epidemic, I was 8 or 9, and I still remember my parents, and my friends parents, reaction and I am sure they were trying their best not to alarm us.
 

Zorba

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 1999
8,235
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The problem is it seems just when somebody says- oh we have this figured out...BLAMMO!! Another strain developes! Sure you would think if you get it once that you would have an immuniy towards getting it again! But don`t count your chickens....
No guarantee obviously, but there is also no evidence of sort lived immunity, either. The biggest risk is obviously a massive different strain coming along, which is why vaccines need to target something that is critical to the virus that can't evolve away and the virus still be viable.
 
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Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
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Polio, also known as infantile paralysis, terrified people because children were the primary victim. If children were the must vulnerable to COVID-19 they you can bet your ass people would be taking it a whole lot more seriously, instead of throwing grandma and grandpa under the bus while we party.

Yes, I remember the polio epidemic, I was 8 or 9, and I still remember my parents, and my friends parents, reaction and I am sure they were trying their best not to alarm us.
I heard on the TV that the virus is killing (emotiomally) the Italian people because the deaths are talking old people whom, according to the info I got, are profoundly loved. Some places it seems may have family values that aren't just a bunch of words.
 

JEDIYoda

Lifer
Jul 13, 2005
33,340
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I heard on the TV that the virus is killing (emotiomally) the Italian people because the deaths are talking old people whom, according to the info I got, are profoundly loved. Some places it seems may have family values that aren't just a bunch of words.
In other words Republicans are nowhere to be found...lol
 
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Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
28,693
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This. Effectiveness of a vaccine .. But since Fauci responds as he do I lean towards him thinking that a vaccine will only be as effective as a flu vaccine is vs. the flu and/or its effects will wither over time as it has been suggested natural protection will even if you have recovered from it yourself. And this is the fucked up part, cause then we got this killer virus with us from here on out. And that is fucked up. World about to change.
I don't think anyone knows how well vaccines will work against SARS-CoV-2. Fauci's response is not informed because he doesn't know. He may have wanted to fend off the impulse of people to want to go back to life as they knew it before this started.

I don't think anyone's assuming this virus is going to act like the flu and mutate regularly. Where do you see that? Some have suggested it might be the case, but I don't see anything from anyone suggesting that this is likely to happen.

This interview sheds some light on these things.

"Flatten the curve.

By slowing it down or flattening it, we're not going to decrease the total number of cases, we're going to postpone many cases, until we get a vaccine—which we will, because there's nothing in the virology that makes me frightened that we won’t get a vaccine in 12 to 18 months. Eventually, we will get to the epidemiologist gold ring."
 

Sonikku

Lifer
Jun 23, 2005
15,566
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I heard on the TV that the virus is killing (emotiomally) the Italian people because the deaths are talking old people whom, according to the info I got, are profoundly loved. Some places it seems may have family values that aren't just a bunch of words.
Quite a departure from the "DROP DEAD, GRAMPS" rhetoric we get here in the US.
 
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cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
14,872
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I don't think anyone knows how well vaccines will work against SARS-CoV-2. Fauci's response is not informed because he doesn't know. He may have wanted to fend off the impulse of people to want to go back to life as they knew it before this started.

I don't think anyone's assuming this virus is going to act like the flu and mutate regularly. Where do you see that? Some have suggested it might be the case, but I don't see anything from anyone suggesting that this is likely to happen.

This interview sheds some light on these things.

"Flatten the curve.

By slowing it down or flattening it, we're not going to decrease the total number of cases, we're going to postpone many cases, until we get a vaccine—which we will, because there's nothing in the virology that makes me frightened that we won’t get a vaccine in 12 to 18 months. Eventually, we will get to the epidemiologist gold ring."
I have read this more than one place :


“But antibodies to the coronaviruses that cause the common cold persist for just one to three years — and that may be true of their new cousin as well.”

As I understand it the reason you need getting flu shots is not so much it mutates its because your immune system forgets them... IIRC we have 2 or 3 major flu strains in circulation that we have vaccines for?
If this turns out to be true for Covid19... Then we are in for a change.
 

Muse

Lifer
Jul 11, 2001
28,693
2,890
126
I have read this more than one place :


“But antibodies to the coronaviruses that cause the common cold persist for just one to three years — and that may be true of their new cousin as well.”

As I understand it the reason you need getting flu shots is not so much it mutates its because your immune system forgets them... IIRC we have 2 or 3 major flu strains in circulation that we have vaccines for?
If this turns out to be true for Covid19... Then we are in for a change.
Well, if we need a yearly vaccine for coronavirus so be it. Maybe it can be taken at the same time as a flu shot or even combined.
 
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Zorba

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 1999
8,235
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I have read this more than one place :


“But antibodies to the coronaviruses that cause the common cold persist for just one to three years — and that may be true of their new cousin as well.”

As I understand it the reason you need getting flu shots is not so much it mutates its because your immune system forgets them... IIRC we have 2 or 3 major flu strains in circulation that we have vaccines for?
If this turns out to be true for Covid19... Then we are in for a change.
MERS and SARS both have long lasting immunity. And SARS2 is much more similar to them than the coronaviruses that cause colds. In 2014 they also found people that lived through the Spanish flu still had antibodies to it, 95 years later.

From what I've heard, including an interview with Fauci, is your body tends to make longer lasting immunity to more severe sicknesses. Which from an evolutionary point of view makes sense.
 
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cytg111

Lifer
Mar 17, 2008
14,872
5,058
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MERS and SARS both have long lasting immunity. And SARS2 is much more similar to them than the coronaviruses that cause colds. In 2014 they also found people that lived through the Spanish flu still had antibodies to it, 95 years later.

From what I've heard, including an interview with Fauci, is your body tends to make longer lasting immunity to more severe sicknesses. Which from an evolutionary point of view makes sense.
Ye hope it turns out this way.
 

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