DOT: Delta not allowed to ban pit bulls as service animals

Page 4 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.
Nov 4, 2004
25,149
1,948
136
#76
Pit bulls have not been bred to attack humans. So what does your argument have to do with comparing pit bull prejudice to racism, or reasoning for wanting the breed banned on flights?

Also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pit_bull#Dog_attack_risk
Your idiocy comparison aside, your link goes on to further detail how inadequate documentation means the numbers can't be verified, not to mention any potentially relevant data from the CDC in the link isnt current

In a 2000 review by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which examines data from both media reports and from the Humane Society of the United States, pit bull-type dogs were identified in approximately one-third of dog bite-related fatalities in the United States between 1981 and 1992. However, the review notes that studies on dog bite-related fatalities which collect information by surveying news reports are subject to potential errors, as some fatal attacks may not have been reported, a study might not find all relevant news reports, and the dog breed might be misidentified. The AVMA has also noted fundamental problems with tracking breed in dog bite-related fatalities. In a 2013 study of 256 fatalities in the United States from 2000 to 2009, the AVMA determined that valid breed determination was possible for only 17.6% of cases.
and then speculates about why when pits do attack, they tend to cause more harm than other breeds.

Contrary to popular myth, pit bulls do not have "locking jaws". There is no physiological "locking mechanism" in the jaw muscle and bone structure of pit bulls or other dogs. Pit bull-type dogs, like other terriers, hunting and bull-baiting breeds, can exhibit a bite, hold, and shake behavior and at times refuse to release. Pit bulls also have wide skulls, well-developed facial muscles, and strong jaws, and some research suggests that pit bull bites are particularly serious because they tend to bite deeply and grind their molars into tissue. Breaking an ammonia ampule and holding it up to the dog's nose can cause the dog to release its hold.
As with any pets, how the pet was raised, and who the owner is has more to do with animals behavior than anything else. Pits have a reputation, whether or not we agree on its basis in reason.

IMO, if it's not a legit license physical disability service animal, the airline is under no obligation to allow it on the plane.
 
Apr 29, 2004
991
13
81
#77
God dammit...I just had to like a Slow post.

Wife is a veterinarian and we own 2 pit mixes. Pit Bull isn't even an AKC listed breed so there is no standard to define what is and isn't a Pit Bull. Even the modern doggie DNA tests don't list Pit Bull as a breed. A lot of large short haired mutts with big heads are going to be identified as a pit bull by the police/media after an attack.

https://www.k9rl.com/can-identify-pitbull/

If any of those dogs bit anyone, you can believe that it would be reported as a pit bull attack.
 
Jul 15, 2000
18,064
146
126
#78
There is no amount of education that will reverse the genetic engineering which was done to these animals. Individual variation in dogs along with proper training is mitigating but not curative. These dogs are purpose-built for what they do and attacking is their nature. Again some individual dogs could be wonderful and safe pets, but that would be an exception to what they were meant for. It's a science thing.

As far as looking at animals for fighting that's far besides the point. It comes down to which are the most dangerous. If you want to compare specific killing and mauling animals that's fine. Why don't you do that as it may be informative. Dobies are feared by many yet hardly in the same league as pit bulls with unwanted attacks.
You speak of "genetic engineering" as if these were a product of modern science/gene splicing, they, of course, are not. A Pitt is not really a good guard dog and here's why,
"The APBT is not the best choice for a guard dog since they are extremely friendly, even with strangers. Aggressive behavior toward humans is uncharacteristic of the breed and highly undesirable. "
APBT's in the past that showed human aggression were put down, as time went on I doubt this policy was enforced by backyard breeders though. If you've ever owned one of these, (I do, a 15yr old) you might understand them a lot better.
 

Maxima1

Platinum Member
Jan 15, 2013
2,439
164
126
#79
You speak of "genetic engineering" as if these were a product of modern science/gene splicing, they, of course, are not. A Pitt is not really a good guard dog and here's why,
"The APBT is not the best choice for a guard dog since they are extremely friendly, even with strangers. Aggressive behavior toward humans is uncharacteristic of the breed and highly undesirable. "
APBT's in the past that showed human aggression were put down, as time went on I doubt this policy was enforced by backyard breeders though. If you've ever owned one of these, (I do, a 15yr old) you might understand them a lot better.
Even if we give that they're less inclined to bite humans than typical breeds, when they do, they're much more likely to keep biting while a lab or something else would just snap and be done.
 
Jun 8, 2005
9,316
41
126
#80
This just shows that the Emotional Support Animal situation is out of control enough that there should be Federal standards set as to what constitutes a Service Animal, with documentation, license, and re-certification. That way, if an owner cannot produce this official documentation, the animal cannot ride in the cabin, period. It would put an end to all this ESA animal silliness, while also preventing the discrimination of the animal solely based on its breed.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS