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Question Does install of operating system cause any damage to CPU

wpshooter

Golden Member
Mar 9, 2004
1,609
2
81
Can the temporary rise to CPUs temperatures due to stress placed on it during the installation and applying major updates to operating systems (i.e. high volume of downloading, copying and installing of OS files) to hard drives cause any damage to the CPU ?

Thanks.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
48,831
5,326
126
Not unless your cooling system and the rest of your CPU is "really br0k3". Then it will probably thermal-throttle, until it hits cutoff temp, then it will suddenly power-off.

Edit: Also, I agree with @viivo 's answer, but not his assessment of the situation. Yes, indeed, decompression and hashing of files, such as happens during a OS upgrade or installation, DOES put quite a load on the CPU, and WILL raise its temp, but shouldn't in any way actually shorten the lifespan of the CPU or the storage device, unless they are "at risk", by being clogged with dust and not cooled properly already.
 

HutchinsonJC

Senior member
Apr 15, 2007
425
158
126
The installation of an OS and the installation of updates for an OS are not that taxing on the CPU.

If you're considering the installation of an OS and the updates of an OS on a new build before all of your parts have arrived (heatsink), don't.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
48,831
5,326
126
The installation of an OS and the installation of updates for an OS are not that taxing on the CPU.
Unless you had to re-install Win7 64-bit SP1 ... and all the updates... on a Core2-era rig with only 4 or 8GB of RAM. (I think that it had 4GB, ouch!) (Edit: I'm saying, that they ARE taxing, on a low-end system, but still shouldn't be "damaging" in any ways, on a properly-built and properly-cooled system.)


On a modern rig, with Windows 10, not really.

If you're considering the installation of an OS and the updates of an OS on a new build before all of your parts have arrived (heatsink), don't.
Good point!
 
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Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
6,543
2,069
136
As long as its under adequate cooling and voltages.. it will never be damaged. They tend to last the longest anyways.. I've seen hard drives, video cards and motherboards die but never a CPU personally.

The only exception is the Pentium II 300mhz which was the first and last time I spent $3000 on a computer. It just slowed down to 45 minutes for 1 reboot.

The best lesson I learned from that computer was build your own.
 
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chrisjames61

Senior member
Dec 31, 2013
629
350
136
Can the temporary rise to CPUs temperatures due to stress placed on it during the installation and applying major updates to operating systems (i.e. high volume of downloading, copying and installing of OS files) to hard drives cause any damage to the CPU ?

Thanks.
Think about it. If it did every personal computer ever built and used would be damaged. Unless you installed your operating system on a different computer and then popped the drive in your computer which surely isn't an ideal way of doing an operating system install.
 

Dave2150

Senior member
Jan 20, 2015
596
129
116
Can the temporary rise to CPUs temperatures due to stress placed on it during the installation and applying major updates to operating systems (i.e. high volume of downloading, copying and installing of OS files) to hard drives cause any damage to the CPU ?

Thanks.
Absolutely not. Assuming your not doing extreme overclocking, (where you'd use too high a voltage and disable protection safeguards) once the physical installation of the CPU and thermal solution has been successfully completed, you'll not be able to damage your CPU under any circumstances.

The only damaged CPU's I've seen are where the user applies liquid metal thermal material, knocks off a capacitor, bends the pins, or cracks the die due to uneven mounting methods (before the days of IHS).
 

Thunder 57

Golden Member
Aug 19, 2007
1,512
1,374
136
As long as its under adequate cooling and voltages.. it will never be damaged. They tend to last the longest anyways.. I've seen hard drives, video cards and motherboards die but never a CPU personally.

The only exception is the Pentium II 300mhz which was the first and last time I spent $3000 on a computer. It just slowed down to 45 minutes for 1 reboot.

The best lesson I learned from that computer was build your own.
Same. I'll add to that PSU's and RAM. RAM was only one time, and I think it was because it was a friends cheapo no name PSU. One of the pins was burnt.
 

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