Does anyone know how to test if something is brass?

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by imported_Tick, Sep 23, 2005.

  1. imported_Tick

    imported_Tick Diamond Member

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    Without using a spectrometer?
     
  2. Wallydraigle

    Wallydraigle Banned

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    If you can make a tuba out of it, it's brass.
     
  3. T3C

    T3C Diamond Member

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    lmao
     
  4. MX2

    MX2 Lifer

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    lol
     
  5. imported_Tick

    imported_Tick Diamond Member

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    MY GOD!!! BRILIANT!!!!!!!!
     
  6. imported_Tick

    imported_Tick Diamond Member

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    Anyone have a serious post?
     
  7. Mark R

    Mark R Diamond Member

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    destiny?
     
  8. imported_Tick

    imported_Tick Diamond Member

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    Do you mean density?
     
  9. Mark R

    Mark R Diamond Member

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    ROLF. Do you need to ask?
     
  10. SnowyEnigma

    SnowyEnigma Senior member

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    its any alloy, so unless you know the ratio of Cu to Sn, then dunno.. density would be between the value of Sn's and Cu's density
     
  11. imported_Tick

    imported_Tick Diamond Member

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    Well, I'd guess it'd be about 40%, but that's useless as there's no way I'm gonna imerse it in water, so there is no practicle way to test for volume.
     
  12. Tiamat

    Tiamat Lifer

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    see how much water it displaces - this is its volume.
    Weigh it on a scale - this is its mass.

    Look up the density of copper, steel, tin, aluminum (the 4 suspects that are commonly used for pipes).

    Density = Mass/volume

    Done.
     
  13. imported_Tick

    imported_Tick Diamond Member

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    Yes, but I'm not going to imerse it in water, and it's not a pipe.
     
  14. Tiamat

    Tiamat Lifer

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    Fine, then take the outer dimensions - its not tough to calculate volume...

    that is unless you cant use a ruler...

    Edit:

    If for some reason you cant get the volume (odd shape) then you have to be able to weigh it. With this, and finding the densities of the above metals on the internet, you can calculate a theoretical volume. If the theoretical volume falls in between that of copper and tin or zink, then you have brass.
     
  15. iwantanewcomputer

    iwantanewcomputer Diamond Member

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    dissolve it in random acids and look up what acids dissolve what elements of brass. I think the brass in instruments is usually mostly copper and zinc, don't know about pipes
     
  16. rahvin

    rahvin Elite Member

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    Buy some brass polish and see if it polishs it? Honestly if it's not brass it's most likely Iron so see if it's ferous.