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Discussion Doctor who had to amputate someone's leg when they were forced to choose between insulin and rent tells truth about Pharma bribes

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ivwshane

Lifer
May 15, 2000
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Since single payer itself wouldn't necessarily directly fix the issue, other than potentially eliminating the most lucrative market, and the companies still need to make something, I'm curious what everyone's preferred solution is? Is revised medical patent law enough? Margin caps, kinda like health insurance providers?
Any solution will require price controls. We can either keep the system we have and control prices or go to a single payer or anything else and control prices.
 
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pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
7,672
2,834
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Well, it's capitalism, it's private ownership. The stock market at least enables you and anyone to be part owner of corporations. Without it, all corporations would be privately owned. That would be worse. Publicly traded companies are subject to much more transparency, are audited by virtue of federal regulations. Privately held companies are shielded, relatively. I know this because my niece's son recently graduated from Tulane University in accounting and now makes a living auditing publicly traded companies, which is required by law. And take note: Even supposedly communist countries, Russia and China, have stock markets.
The word 'supposedly' is doing a lot of work there. I don't think Russia is even 'supposedly' communist. China's a complicated one, I suppose communist politics with captialist economics. Looks a bit like Pinochet's Chile to me, weirdly. But Russia? It's late-capitalist, the logical outcome of anarcho-capitalism, a mafia state. Nothing communist about it.

While this doctor seemingly advocates for a universal health care system he would do well to remember these wise words....


"...People who have health emergencies can't wait for us to have a theoretical debate about some better idea that will never, ever come to pass."


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The wisdom of being moderate and realistic, and above-all, electable', right? How did that work out?
 
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blankslate

Diamond Member
Jun 16, 2008
8,471
423
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The wisdom of being moderate and realistic, and above-all, electable', right? How did that work out?
Not very well and that is why I italicized the word wise in my reply. Unfortunately facetiousness doesn't translate well.

Medicare 4 All is a great position for the Democratic Party to run on and use as part of a 2020 platform. However, there are some Democratic politicians who have accepted too much big pharma or other health care related donations to honestly advocate for the solution that works for just about every other wealthy first world country far better than our rapacious "free" market system works for the U.S.

Sure Hillary won the popular vote but if you peruse the data at http://www.thegreenpapers.com which breaks down election results by actual numbers of votes per state among other interesting information you find that Hillary's margin of victory in the popular vote was largely in CA and New York. Hillary could have given up 1.5 million CA votes for a slightly lesser amount of votes in the firewall states and she would have won the EC as well.

Of course when I have criticized her campaign for being too safe and moderate some other posters hate it. I do take comfort in knowing that President Obama and people in his camp agree with my assessment of her campaign as "scripted" and "soulless"

BOOK: Obama Took 2016 Election as ‘Personal Insult,’ Blamed Hillary’s ‘Soulless, Scripted Campaign’

After Obama spoke to Clinton and told her to concede defeat, Baker says the former president and his team put the blame on her for running a “scripted, soulless campaign” that failed to turn his presidency into a winning message.
bolded by me for emphasis


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blankslate

Diamond Member
Jun 16, 2008
8,471
423
126
It's 2019. It's time to worry about today and tomorrow.
FYI Today and tomorrow there are some Democratic politicians who are beholden enough to big money from Pharma and health care insurance industry sources that they will not push a policy that most Americans support including almost 50% of republicans/conservatives.

Now they won't say anything as bluntly as it was said back in 2016 but it's real and it is today (and tomorrow)

*e2a*

As an example here is a video about "Beton MyStork" who practically repeated the talking point from 2016 in response to a question on health care in a recent town hall... which coincidentally had lower than usual ratings for CNN in that time slot.



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