do i need to use sysprep when ghost cloning?

Discussion in 'Operating Systems' started by mOrphine, Mar 18, 2002.

  1. mOrphine

    mOrphine Senior member

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    this is the first time im attempting cloning a hard drive with ghost. i am running winxp.

    source harddrive is a 20gb maxtor with 7 partitions.

    destination harddrive is a new 40gb maxtor.

    i would like to clone the source to the destination hard drive, after which, probably use partition magic 7 to tweak the partitions so i end up with 6 x 10 gb partitions on both drives.

    my question is, can i simply do a disk copy in ghost and hope that after the process is finished, i can boot up fine from the destination drive?

    or do i need to do anything else like this sysprep utility i came across from reading the symantec website?

    thanx :)
     
  2. mOrphine

    mOrphine Senior member

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    bump

    someone please gimme a suggestion... my 40gb hdd is just sitting in there :confused:
     
  3. bignick

    bignick Senior member

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    well i've never used ghost, but if it's like powerquest drive image you don't copy the harddrive, but individual partitions. sysprep is only needed if you are going to use the same image on multiple machines, or different mass storage controllers (ide or scsi controllers). the reason to use it for multiple machines, is that it will regenerate the machine sid (secruity id). if that's not different on every computer, you could run into conflicts or problems on the network.
     
  4. mOrphine

    mOrphine Senior member

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    << the reason to use it for multiple machines, is that it will regenerate the machine sid (secruity id). if that's not different on every computer, you could run into conflicts or problems on the network. >>



    is the sid generated from hardware components like the hard drive? if the new hdd is gonna be used on the same computer, would a new sid need to be generated?

    or can i just go ahead with the disk cloning?
     
  5. Rob G.

    Rob G. Senior member

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    Not sure what Sysprep is supposed to do.

    I would imagine you could just do a Disk - To Disk clone. Ghost will give you the option of resizing the partitions as you're doing it.

     
  6. NogginBoink

    NogginBoink Diamond Member

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    Use sysprep.

    Sysprep is designed for exactly what you're attempting to do.

    If you use sysprep, MS will give you support on the resulting system.

    Sysprep is your friend.
     
  7. cleverhandle

    cleverhandle Diamond Member

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    << sysprep is only needed if you are going to use... different mass storage controllers (ide or scsi controllers). >>



    Just wanted to doublecheck this... this is definitely true? I knew about the SID regeneration, and I knew that you can't change mass storage controllers with a simple disk image, but I didn't see that you could change storage controllers in the sysprep info I have.
     
  8. Saltin

    Saltin Platinum Member

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    Sysprep is useful when you have an image and you want to apply it to many computers. It allows you to change the computer name, IP, computer account SID, and other UI's. It is not terribly helpful in a situation where hardware is different across the computers. In fact, it almost requires that it be uniform.

    If all you want to do is copy one box, you dont need sysprep. Sysprep was made with domains in mind (namely the need for unique computer names/identifiers that comes with a domain). If it is a standalone box, sysprep is, to my knowledge, a wasted step.

    To wit, straight from MS's mouth sysprep is useful for



    << Corporate customers deploying thousands of Windows-based computers on similar hardware in homogeneous computing environments >>



    Of course, sysprep is useful in smaller set up's too (hundreds or even ten's of computers, depends on you), but the jist of the statement is homogeneous computing environments and similar hardware. Rest assured that when MS say "similar hardware" they mean EXACTLY similar, hehe.

    Please note, I am not talking about plug and play hardware here, that can be different. With sysprep 1.1, you can even go SCSI to IDE (or vice versa). I mean the computers must have compatible HALS.

    So....
    1) I dont think sysprep is for you, unless you have a domain with a bunch of clients you want to apply the image to
    2) Sysprep wont take care of HAL hardware differences
    Good Luck
     
  9. Bglad

    Bglad Golden Member

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    Dang... 7 partitions on a 20G drive?

    Although your way with Partition Magic will probably work fine, I don't like the idea of playing with partitions after there is data on them.

    I would partition and format the new drive the way you want it with FDISK/Win2000/WinXP disk. Then do partition to partition copies for each one using Ghost.

    Give your volumes a name i.e. name C: Win98, D: Programs, etc. Ghost will show you the names instead of just the volume and partition info and size. It is much easier to keep many partitions straight in Ghost.
     
  10. NogginBoink

    NogginBoink Diamond Member

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    << Sysprep is useful when you have an image and you want to apply it to many computers. It allows you to change the computer name, IP, computer account SID, and other UI's. It is not terribly helpful in a situation where hardware is different across the computers. In fact, it almost requires that it be uniform. >>


    This is most certainly NOT true.

    The *only* requirement is that the source and target computers must use the same HAL.

    Yes, you can use sysprep with different hard disk controllers. Look at the sysprepmassstorage documentation.

    I have many customers that have successfully used sysprep (with and without RIPREP) to deploy images to a diverse set of target computers in a corporate environment.
     
  11. mOrphine

    mOrphine Senior member

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    hmmm thanx for all the varied replies...

    i dont want to

    << change the computer name, IP, computer account SID, and other UI's >>

    , im using the new hdd on the same computer... im just worried that winxp would refuse to boot up when it realises its on a different hdd.

    would that happen if i simply do a disk clone?

    if i were to use sysprep, i assume i have to run it BEFORE cloning the old hdd and after the partitions have been transferred to the new hdd, sysprep will take it from there on the next bootup with the new hdd?
     
  12. Oogle

    Oogle Member

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    I have done exactly what you are describing, except with w2k instead of wxp. I was attempting to move my OS partition from an old hard drive to a new hard drive. Here's what happened:

    Without sysprep:
    Ghosted partition from old hard drive to new hard drive.
    Removed old hard drive, booted using new hard drive.
    I could not log in using any account, even admin. I lost all security privileges. Locked out of my OS.

    With sysprep:
    Run sysprep. Sysprep shuts down my computer
    Boot up PC using a boot disk.
    From DOS, ghosted partition from old hard drive to new hard drive.
    Removed old hard drive, booted using new hard drive.
    W2K went through a "setup procedure". Had to provide a CD-Key and auto detect a few pieces of hardware.
    Logged in ok, everything normal.

    Hope this experience helps you.
     
  13. mOrphine

    mOrphine Senior member

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    << I have done exactly what you are describing, except with w2k instead of wxp. I was attempting to move my OS partition from an old hard drive to a new hard drive. Here's what happened:

    Without sysprep:
    Ghosted partition from old hard drive to new hard drive.
    Removed old hard drive, booted using new hard drive.
    I could not log in using any account, even admin. I lost all security privileges. Locked out of my OS.

    With sysprep:
    Run sysprep. Sysprep shuts down my computer
    Boot up PC using a boot disk.
    From DOS, ghosted partition from old hard drive to new hard drive.
    Removed old hard drive, booted using new hard drive.
    W2K went through a "setup procedure". Had to provide a CD-Key and auto detect a few pieces of hardware.
    Logged in ok, everything normal.

    Hope this experience helps you.
    >>



    yes that helps! :Q
     
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