Do I need extra cooling if not overclocking?

Discussion in 'Cases & Cooling' started by sesshin, Mar 1, 2007.

  1. sesshin

    sesshin Junior Member

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    I'm building a computer for the first time:
    E6600 / Asus P5B Deluxe / Asus X1950 Pro

    I don't plan on overclocking at all for the time being, maybe just a little at some point in the future...

    question is though; do I need more than just the stock heat sink/fans if not overclocking?

    I figure I can just get by on stock for now to save a little bit of money in the meantime, then add extra cooling in later when I decide to push it further.
     
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  3. RallyMaster

    RallyMaster Diamond Member

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    stock heatsink might be loud so you might want to change it out if you want to keep your computer relatively quiet while you work or something. I'm not overclocking but I changed out my cooling anyway because the stock stuff (stock Northbridge cooler died, stock CPU cooler too loud, etc) had some problems.
     
  4. mgutz

    mgutz Member

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    the stock cooler is fine even for mild overclocking. the core 2 duo chips are that good, they use less power so less heat than their predecessors. my suggestion would be to use artic silver 5 instead of the provided thermal paste if you plan to do light overclocking.

    i agree, the stock is a little too noisy for my liking but i am a quiet-computing freak. once you get used to silence you change all your fans.

     
  5. AstroDogg

    AstroDogg Member

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    NOTE: ArticSilver5 is very thick and gooey. Spread it as thin as possible and do not combine acids from your fingers into the mixture. It is the best thermal paste I have used, But remember it has a longer working time than most other pastes such as ArticSilver3. If overclocking to the limit you will notice about a five day period till it is fully seated. This could force you to lower your max OC settings a few Mhz if using the same settings of the same exact setup. This may not be noticeable if changing from a low quality thermal adhesive or a major upgrade in H.S. After five days retest your max OC limit. I have noticed 3-5C° drop over other thermal pastes even ArticSilver3 after the heatsink has had a chance to completely work-in. I always use a very specific method that belongs in a different thread which may aid in the time to fully seat but I doubt this as it seems like magic on the fifth day everything just clicks together.
     
  6. RonAKA

    RonAKA Member

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    No, not a chance. Intel is not going to sell you a chip with a cooler that is going to risk their warranty when you leave it at stock speed. The E4300 to E6700 all use the same cooler. I find even at full speed on my 4300 it is quite quiet, and cools very well. Save your $$ for something that will give you more value.
     
  7. LOUISSSSS

    LOUISSSSS Diamond Member

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    no, you do not need aftermarket cooling if not overclocking.

    but something like a scythe ninja (w/ a yate loon 120mm fan) will make your CPU a lot cooler at stock speeds and a little more quiet.. although the stock cooler isn't all that loud in the first place

    a tuniq tower or a zalman 9700 will make your system a lot better from inside the case and lower your temps significantly but cost you around $50-70
     
  8. imported_Smurf

    imported_Smurf Senior member

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    Exactly.

    However, if you wanted something QUIET, just take a look at anandtech's front page.

    Thermalright Ultra 120 Extreme

    Thermalright Ultra 120

    These are fanless heatsinks, and if I weren't overclocking, I would have certainly thown one of these in on my system.
     
  9. RonAKA

    RonAKA Member

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    Perhaps my ears are failing but I can't hear my Intel stock (E4300) fan running at 2100 rpm inside my Sonata II case.
     
  10. Frintin

    Frintin Senior member

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    My Intel stock fan is certainly not loud enough to bother me. I was actually surprised how nice and quiet my new machine is (has 120mm fans etc instead of like 8 80mm fans at full speed!)

    I overclock a couple computers that I own. I have an AMD 2500+ Barton that screams, and an AMD 2600+ that is not even overclocked. I have an AMD X2 3600 that is overclocked and I have an Intel e6300 that is stock.

    I have used both stock and aftermarket heatsinks/fans because cooling in the summer where I live is a huge issue. Always had to buy beefier for the AMD's, looking forward to seeing how the stock Intel holds up in the summer.

    I am going to say that if you stick stock into a cubby on a desk or in a bookshelf etc. and you do not provide extra cooling (more case fans, air conditioned regulated room) then you are going to have heat problems sooner or later.