Do Christians and Muslims believe in the SAME god?

ProfJohn

Lifer
Jul 28, 2006
18,251
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0
Got into a disagreement with a strong Christian lady that I know who swore that Muslims do not believe in the same god as Christians. She agreed that Jews did, but seemed to not think the same for Muslims.

Can someone with a little more knowledge give me the 411 on how this breaks down.

And to make this fit into P&N. Could the fact that many people think the same as her influence how we as a country look at Muslims?
 

Strk

Lifer
Nov 23, 2003
10,198
4
76
Technically speaking, Jews, Christians and Muslims all believe in the same G_d. And similar to going from Jews to Christians, going from Christians to Muslims you have another individual preaching the message of G_d (I.e. going from no messiah to Jesus and then to a new prophet, as well as demoting Jesus from messiah).
 

jpeyton

Moderator in SFF, Notebooks, Pre-Built/Barebones
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Aug 23, 2003
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God is a universal concept; I don't see how you could discern the difference between God among religions, unless a religion specifies something that another does not.

For example, if religion A said God is a black woman, and religion B did not, they would not be the same god. But since most religions define God as an omnipresent being with no specific definable qualities, they may/may not be the same.
 

zephyrprime

Diamond Member
Feb 18, 2001
7,512
2
81
According to the Muslims, it is the same god. Basically, according to Islam, Islam is Judaism 3.0. Jewish Judaism is Judaism 1.0. Christianity is Judaism 2.0. From the viewpoint of the Christians, all the supernatural stuff that happened in Islam is just made up or is the result of delusions. Of course, Jews have the same view of Jesus's resurrection.

There's no way to truly answer this question just by going off of historical information as we know it. Ultimately, it comes down to whether or not the supernatural stuff that happened in each of the religions actually occurred. If it didn't occur, then people are all worshiping nothing and the question of whether the gods are the same or not is meaningless. If it did occur, then the Muslim and Christian gods are one in the same. If one or more of the religions is wrong while the other(s) are correct, then adjust world view accordingly.
 

zephyrprime

Diamond Member
Feb 18, 2001
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81
Originally posted by: jpeytonFor example, if religion A said God is a black woman, and religion B did not, they would not be the same god. But since most religions define God as an omnipresent being with no specific definable qualities, they may/may not be the same.
The thing is, the religions mentioned by the OP have many specific attributes of God and specify numerous concrete actions that God enacted thus making God a identifiable entitity rather than being purely ethereal.

 

bamacre

Lifer
Jul 1, 2004
21,030
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61
Too generalized of a question, really. I imagine that I don't believe in the same God as other Christians. :D

But to answer your question, supposedly, yes.
 

cumhail

Senior member
Apr 1, 2003
682
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Originally posted by: Strk
Technically speaking, Jews, Christians and Muslims all believe in the same G_d. And similar to going from Jews to Christians, going from Christians to Muslims you have another individual preaching the message of G_d (I.e. going from no messiah to Jesus and then to a new prophet, as well as demoting Jesus from messiah).

Actually Muslims do accept Jesus as the messiah and believe that his second coming is foreseen as preceding the day of judgement. They just do not accept him as being God incarnate nor in his being a literal "son of God."

And yes, all three do believe in the same God and follow the same tradition; they just differ, at times, in what they believe this God's message is and who (or what) some of God's messengers were. In pre-Islamic arabic pagan traditions "Illah" just meant "deity," and it had singular and plural forms, used to refer to multiple figures. With the coming of Islam, this was largely replaced by a form of the word that has only a singular form and that could not be pluralized: "Allah," which means "The God." But at the end of the day... the fact that there are different words, in different languages, for what we call "chairs" and "tables" and "God" doesn't necessarily make them mean different things.
 

ntdz

Diamond Member
Aug 5, 2004
6,989
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They believe in the same god. Whether than god even exists is a whole nother debate.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
83,928
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Yes, in that they all believe in the god of Abraham. The guy with the beard.
 

Jhhnn

IN MEMORIAM
Nov 11, 1999
62,365
14,681
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All three religions trace their roots back to Abraham, and his relationship with the one true God...

Muslims regard the old testament and the new as divine scripture... with the Koran being the final chapter, Mohammed the last prophet...

Various fringe Christian groups have tried to claim otherwise, for their own purposes...
 

Lemon law

Lifer
Nov 6, 2005
20,984
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If there is a supreme and all powerful God---he/she/it must find it beneath notice that human kind can't seem to agree on anything. If God was a person---he/she/it would be totally confused about its own nature after listening to various clueless nuts whose only commonality seems to be the wearing funny hats.
 

Martin

Lifer
Jan 15, 2000
29,178
1
81
Yes they do. On a related note, despite their rabid devotion to it, Americans are awfully ignorant of religion.
Americans are also the most religiously ignorant people in the Western world. Fewer than half of us can identify Genesis as the first book of the Bible, and only one third know that Jesus delivered the Sermon on the Mount.
.....
Approximately 75 percent of adults, according to polls cited by Prothero, mistakenly believe the Bible teaches that "God helps those who help themselves." More than 10 percent think that Noah's wife was Joan of Arc. Only half can name even one of the four Gospels, and -- a finding that will surprise many -- evangelical Christians are only slightly more knowledgeable than their non-evangelical counterparts.
....
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co...1/AR2007030102073.html?referrer=reddit


This does explain nicely why the peons can be whipped into a rage over gay marriage (6 references in the bible to homosexuality), but you'd hardly hear a word about increasing foreign aid (as in helping people, not killing them) or universal healthcare (helping the poor - one of Jesus' main teachings!)
 

themusgrat

Golden Member
Nov 2, 2005
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lol. i bet most of you don't really believe in any sort of "god."

Technically speaking, no they don't. One might conclude that they do, and in some sense, if you equate x religion with y religion, then, sure, ya. But the description of those two gods is totally different. Try reading the Koran and the Bible, that will show you what you are looking for.
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
33,423
7,484
136
Originally posted by: ProfJohn
Got into a disagreement with a strong Christian lady that I know who swore that Muslims do not believe in the same god as Christians. She agreed that Jews did, but seemed to not think the same for Muslims.

Can someone with a little more knowledge give me the 411 on how this breaks down.

And to make this fit into P&N. Could the fact that many people think the same as her influence how we as a country look at Muslims?

As far as I am concerned Allah and God are two words to the same object or same meaning.

However, I find the prophets to be in stark contrast. One was murdered while the other was a murderer ? the messages therein mark the religions as very different.
 

JEDIYoda

Lifer
Jul 13, 2005
33,981
3,318
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http://www.gotquestions.org/same-God.html

Question: "Do Christians & Muslims worship the same God?"



Answer: The answer to this question depends on what is meant by "same God." There is no denying that the Muslim view of God and the Christian view of God have many similarities. Both view God as absolutely sovereign, omnipotent, omniscient, omnipresent, holy, just, righteous. Both Islam and Christianity believe in one God who is the Creator of everything in the universe. So, yes, in this sense, Christians & Muslims worship the same God.



At the same time, there are also important differences between the Christian and Muslim view of God. While Muslims view Allah as possessing the attributes of love, mercy, and grace; Allah does not demonstrate these attributes in the same manner as the Christian God. The most important difference, though, between the Muslim and Christian view of God is the concept of incarnation. Christians believe that God became a human being in the Person of Jesus Christ. Muslims believe this concept to be the ultimate blasphemy. Muslims can never accept the idea that Allah would become a man to die for the sins of the world. A belief in the incarnation of God in the Person of Jesus Christ is absolutely essential to the Christian understanding of God. God became a human being so He could empathize with us, and more importantly, so He could provide salvation, the forgiveness of sins.



So, do Christians and Muslims worship the same God? Yes and no. Perhaps a better question would be, "Do Christians and Muslims both have a correct understanding of what God is like?" To this, the answer is a definitely no. There are several crucial differences between the Christian and Muslim concepts of God. Both faiths cannot be correct. We believe that Christianity has the correct view of God because there can be no salvation unless sin is paid for. Only God could pay such a price. Only by becoming a human being could God die on our behalf, paying the penalty for our sins (Romans 5:8; 2 Corinthians 5:21).

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http://www.religion-online.org/showarticle.asp?title=3137

In late 2003 President Bush said, in response to a reporter?s question, that he believed Muslims and Christians "worship the same God." The remark sparked criticism from some Christians, who thought Bush was being politically correct but theologically inaccurate. For example, Ted Haggard, head of the National Association of Evangelicals, said, "The Christian God encourages freedom, love, forgiveness, prosperity and health. The Muslim god appears to value the opposite."

Do Muslims and Christians worship the same God? The question raises a fundamental issue in interfaith discussion, especially for monotheists. We asked several scholars to consider the question. Umar F. Abd-Allah?s article is the fifth in a series.)

As a Muslim, I am led by my understanding of religious history, languages and Islamic theology to say unequivocally that Christians and Muslims worship the same God. But at the outset I wonder if it is appropriate to ignore the political setting for discussing such a topic and its possible bearing on human lives. The quotations from George Bush and Ted Haggard -- the first timely, the second reckless -- give the appearance of offering theological clarifications, while each is firmly grounded in political bedrock. Can we undertake our query as an academic exercise and set aside its political context within the charged ambience of our times?

It is suggested that we not be encumbered in the discussion by what is politically correct. Political correctness is good etiquette and sensible advice for not getting punched in the nose. But this topic implicates much weightier concerns than mere political correctness -- like fundamental considerations of moral responsibility and human rights.

As an educator, I have rarely encountered students who liked being told what they are to think; as a Muslim, I am naturally sensitive to attempts by others to define what I or my community believes. Few Jews or Christians would delegate to others the definition of themselves or their private and collective devotion. While welcoming the CHRISTIAN CENTURY?S commendable undertaking of this discussion, I remain as fundamentally interested in the current implications of the question "Do we worship the same God?" as I am with answering it. Will the question be taken as inquisitive or Inquisitorial? Who carries the burden of proof? Do we make similar inquiries equally of all groups? Would a negative answer -- the preference of Ted Haggard and others on the Religious Right -- imply negative consequences? If we were to insist that Christians did not worship the same thing as Buddhists or Hindus -- not to mention agnostics and atheists -- would that jeopardize basic rights, constructive dialogue and positive social engagement?

I take pride in Islam?s centuries-long eminence as a global civilization, upholding religious tolerance at a time when it was little known and less practiced elsewhere and fashioning arabesques of unity in diversity out of the races and major denominations of Eurasia and Africa. I am also soberly conscious of the challenges of our time and the damaging, culturally predatory effect of religious fundamentalisms among us all. Human beings cast shadows, and so too the religious traditions in which they have a part.

Unity in diversity is a lofty goal and requires candor about what separates as well as what joins us; an arabesque begins with the integrity of its smallest parts. In 21st-century America, the quest for God?s wisdom in our plurality is a religious aspiration worthy -- and, I would add, natural -- for us all. But as we continue along this path, we do well to keep the Islamic adage in mind, "When the scholar slips, thousands fall." Not all questions are dispassionate; some affect people?s lives and well-being and should not be battered about in the political winds of the time.

We must first be clear about what we mean when we ask if Christians and Muslims worship the same God. Is it a question of indication and identity or of attributions, character and actions? Are we talking about subjects or predicates? Ultimately, we must talk about both. By focusing on the subject -- the ontological identity of the object we worship and the names we use to set it apart -- we enter into an area of common understanding and broad consensus.

Etymologically, Jews, Christians and Muslims originally called God by virtually identical names. The Arabic Allah comes from the same root as the biblical "God" (El hîm h_-El_hîm and h_-Elôh) invoked by the Hebrew prophets or the Aramaic/Syriac Al_h presumably used by John the Baptist and Jesus. Historically, we have identified our "object of worship" -- probably the literal proto-Semitic sense of All--h, El_hîm and Al_h_ -- as the God of Abraham. And, in general, homo religiosus -- within and without the Abrahamic traditions -- makes remarkably similar allusions to God, creator of the heavens and earth.

If, however, we insist on the predicates, then we enter into the difficult terrain of theological dispute and creedal dissonance. But predicates should not be forever avoided; they are detrimental only when emphasized to the exclusion or concealment of the subject.

We must, however, get our predications right. Closeness to God within Islam is not undeveloped or limited to the domain of mysticism; Islamic theological traditions affirm explicitly that God is at once both transcendent and immanent -- temporal opposition does not pertain to the uncreated -- and day-to-day Muslim culture reflects discernible intimacy with God even in mundane affairs.

Neither is the affirmation that humanity was created "in the All-Merciful?s image" -- an issue central to Jewish and Christian theology -- foreign to Islam. It is, in fact, more frequently attested in Islam?s authoritative scriptures than in the Bible and cannot be facilely attributed to "later traditions." While rejecting anthropomorphism, major traditions of Islamic thought -- within and without the domain of mysticism -- have given such texts a profoundly theomorphic explication, especially in conjunction with the epiphany of God?s names in creation.

Although Muslims and Christians do not share identical scriptures, the traditional Islamic view of the biblical narrative is nuanced and often very well informed. We must also be careful not to oversimplify marginal positions that, in our time, may owe more to the legacy of German scholars like Julius Wellhausen than they do to the Islamic tradition, which, for example, debated not whether Ezra was "a major villain" but whether he was a prophet -- and therefore infallible according to Islamic theology -- or a righteous Israelite.

When focusing on the diversity of religious predicates, we might ask: "Does anyone worship the same God?" Can any faith or its followers sport an essentialist label? Which religion can claim to have held a monolithic theological view even within its creedal schools? Hillel and Shammai -- the sagely Pharisaic "pair" -- sat together at the head of the Great Sanhedrin but posited sharply divergent visions of God?s character and actions. The Alexandrian Fathers and their counterparts in Antioch were not always affectionately immersed in Christian fellowship. For that matter, earlier Jews and Christians not only differed from their Hellenistic brethren on how they viewed God and Christ but held jarringly different notions of the basic structure of reality.

In Islam, the disparity between theological discourse of earlier and later centuries stands out visibly. Muslims can also hear to this day the echoes of earlier theological battles between the literalists and the rationalists, whose formulations often stand in sharp contrast to those of the great theosophical Sufis like Rumi or Ibn ?Arabi.

At its inceptive and most basic level religion is unpredicated -- a direct experience, often numinous and ineffable, but in all cases utterly individual. Creeds and theological predicates bring religion?s original spiritual domain within the reach of reason. Experience is translated into thought and discourse; definitions and propositions delimit numinous reality. Parameters demarcate lines of inclusion and exclusion, standards of orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and, in due course, religion constitutes the basis of collective identity and social reality.

At the level of the worshiper, however, religious experience has a tendency to seek out its place of origin. Notwithstanding all of religion?s creedal statements and outward dimensions, worship grounds itself at the perceptual level within the heart and mind, where direct apprehension necessarily reveals patterns of infinite individuation. When a creedal formula is shared, each person sharing it forms, nonetheless, a unique psychological construct for what he or she believes about it. At the empirical level -- alone with God -- all believers, the religious and the less deeply religious alike, posit their own predicates and have their own compelling or not-so-compelling vision of God. At the existential level of living faith and inner constructs of belief, the clear-cut lines so essential to unified doctrine and distinctive creeds blur, and the world of faith becomes a kaleidoscope.

From a Muslim?s perspective, the premise that Muslims, Jews and Christians believe in the same God -- the God of Abraham -- is so central to Islamic theology that unqualified rejection of it would, for many, be tantamount to a repudiation of faith. From the Qur?anic standpoint, Muslims, Christians and Jews should have no difficulty agreeing that they all turn to the God of Abraham, despite their theological and ritual differences. Historical arguments between their faiths have rarely if ever been over what to call Abraham?s God or who was invoked by that call, and Islamic salvation history is rooted in the conviction that there is a lasting continuity between the dispensations of Muhammad, Abraham, Moses, Jesus and the biblical and extrabiblical prophets.

The Qur?an instructs Muslims to acknowledge openly and forthrightly that their God and the God of biblical religion is the same: "Do not dispute with the people of the Book [the Bible -- Jews and Christians] but in the best of manners, excepting those of them who commit oppression, and say [to them]; ?We believe in what was revealed to us and what was revealed to you. Our God and your God is one, and we are a people in [willing] submission to him" (Qur?an 29:46).

As Jacob Neusner, Tamara Sonn and Jonathan E. Brockopp have cogently demonstrated in Judaism and Islam in Practice: A Sourcebook (Routledge, 2000), Judaism and Islam share a "concentric character," and their judgments about what matters between God and humanity generally agree. One would presume that, if Christians can accept partnership with Jews as worshiping the same God, they should have no insurmountable problems with Muslims, who historically have seen themselves as occupying the theological middle ground between Jews and Christians.

Bertrand Russell wrote, "The opinions that are held with passion are always those for which no good ground exists." Many of the grounds enflaming passions today between Muslims and non-Muslims have no good ground. If Judaism and Islam are concentric, Christianity and Islam have never been radically far apart. Not infrequently, they have been "too close for comfort" -- geographically and theologically -- although historically this was truer for Catholics than Protestants, to whom the Ottoman Empire gave active backing during the Reformation.

Süleyman I the Magnificent grounded his foreign policy on the defense of Germany?s Lutheran princes and the Huguenots of France. Safiyya Baffo, a Venetian convert and Ottoman queen with some influence over Turkish foreign policy, wrote to her friend Queen Elizabeth in 1594, addressing her as "chosen among those which triumph under the standard of JESUS CHRIST" (her capitals) and emphasizing how Elizabeth?s Protestant policies had stirred hope in Muslim hearts.

The 21st century may turn out to be a time of acute religious rivalry. New religious movements seem to be born every day; on all continents and in all faiths, fundamentalism is unlikely to prove transitory; and even liberal Christianity may find itself threatened by a new reformation emanating from the geographic South. Interfaith dialogue and cross-denominational understanding have never been more important. Perhaps the conviction that all the Abrahamic family worships the same God will help us triumph under his standard and stir hope in believing hearts.

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http://www.evangelicaloutpost.com/mt/mt-comments.cgi?entry_id=116

http://www.trueu.org/Academics/LectureHall/A000000113.cfm

Muslims and Christians: How to Get Along?
They both believe in one personal and transcendent God who has sent his prophets into the world. They both believe in sacred writings that record the prophetic revelations. They both believe that Jesus was a prophet who was sinless and born of a virgin. And they both worship with these beliefs firmly in place. We are speaking of Muslims and Christians, whose members comprise the two largest monotheistic religions in the world.

In the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Americans have become fascinated with the beliefs and practices of Islam, which is the fastest growing religion in the world, with approximately 1.3 billion adherents. Increasingly, Muslims are immigrating to the West. In various American cities, it is not uncommon to find mosques ? many of them newly built ? and to see women in the traditional Muslim dress mingling with American women dressed quite differently.

Muslims and Christians comprise the two largest monotheistic religions in the world.
In light of this, many Westerners wonder what do Muslims believe and why. They also question the relationship between Islam and Christianity. Do Muslims and Christians worship the same God, but merely in different ways? Should Christians seek to present their beliefs to Muslims in the hope that the Muslim might forsake Islam and embrace Christianity? Or is this simply a waste of time at best or rude at worst?

Many instruct us to be "tolerant" and to refrain from "proselytizing" anyone. In the name of tolerance, some people say that Christians and Muslims should coexist without trying to convert (or otherwise challenge) each other because "Christians and Muslims worship the same God." This, many believe, should be good enough for Muslims and Christians. Many also believe this arrangement is good enough for the God they both worship as well. If both religions worship the same God, why should they worry about each other's spiritual state?

Religion, God and Truth
If indeed Muslims and Christians worship the same God, there would be little need for disagreement, dialogue, and debate between them. If I am satisfied to shop at one grocery store and you are satisfied to shop at another store, why should I try to convince you to shop at my store or vice versa? Do not both stores provide the food we need, even if each sells different brands? The analogy is tidy, but does it really fit?

Deeper questions need to be raised if we are to settle the question of whether Christians and Muslims worship the same God. First, what are the essential teachings of Christianity and Islam? Second, what does each religion teach about worshipping its God? Third, what does each religion teach about the other religion? That is, do the core teachings of Islam and Christianity assure their adherents that members of the other religion are fine as they are because both religions "worship the same God"?

In When Religion Becomes Evil (Harper. San Francisco, 2002), Charles Kimball argues that Christians and Muslims do indeed worship the same God. Kimball rightly observes that truth claims are foundational for religion. But he claims that believers err when they hold their religious beliefs in a "rigid" or "absolute" manner. So, he argues, when some Christians criticize the Islamic view of God (Allah) as deficient, they reveal their ignorance and bigotry. Kimball asserts that "there is simply no ambiguity here. Jews, Christians, and Muslims are talking about the same deity" (p. 50). This is because the Qur'an affirms that Allah inspired the Hebrew prophets and Jesus. Moreover, the Arabic word "Allah" means "God." Are Professor Kimball and so many others who echo similar themes correct? In search of a reasonable answer, we will briefly consider the three questions from the last paragraph.

Christianity and Islam: The Claims, the Logic, and the Differences
First, what are the teachings that each religion takes to be absolutely true? Although Islam and Christianity are both monotheistic, their views of God differ considerably. Islam denies that God is a Trinity ? that one God eternally exists as three co-eternal and equal persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit (Matthew 28:19).1 Islam also rejects that God became a man in Jesus Christ (John 1:1-18).2 These doctrines are cornerstones of Christianity. But God cannot be both a Trinity (Christian) and not a Trinity (Islam). This is matter of simple logic; it has nothing to do with religious intolerance or being "rigid."

Although Islam and Christianity are both monotheistic, their views of God differ considerably.
For Christianity, humans are corrupted by an inherited sinful nature that cannot be overcome by any human means (Ephesians 2:1-10). But Islam denies that human have a deeply sinful human nature, claiming that we sin because we are merely weak and ignorant.3 Christianity teaches that salvation is secured only through faith in the achievements of Jesus Christ ? his life, death, and resurrection (John 3:16-18). Islam, however, implores its followers to obey the laws of the Qur'an in the hopes that they will be found worthy of paradise.4 Since these two views contradict each other, both views cannot be true.

Second, how does each religion say worship should be offered to God? Muslims deem worship of the Trinity to be polytheistic and thus blasphemous. Worship of Jesus ? whom they deem only human ? is anathema. Yet these beliefs are essential for Christian worship. One must worship God "in spirit and in truth" (John 4:24). Worship requires assent to the truth of God (the Trinity), belief in the gospel, trust in Jesus Christ, and submission to God?s will. While Muslims emphasize submission to Allah ("Islam" means submission), they do not submit to the God revealed in the Bible. This exposes another irreconcilable difference between Islam and Christianity.

Third, what does each religion make of the other one? Muslims and Christians have historically tried to convert each other, since they both view adherents of other religions to be misguided. Islam seeks converts worldwide because it believes Allah is supreme over all and must be so recognized. Christians are commanded to take the gospel into all the nations and to baptize converts into the name of the triune God of the Bible (Matthew 28:18-20).

C O F F E E S H O P

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Dr. Groothuis argues that Christians and Muslims do not worship the same God. What do you think?

Join the discussion!
Neither Christianity nor Islam can logically endorse the other religion?s distinctive claims and practices without denying its own.

Much more needs to be discussed concerning Muslim and Christian relations in a religiously pluralistic world. However, we must conclude that despite their common monotheism, Islam and Christianity have very different views of God, worship, and mission. Therefore, it is unreasonable to claim that they worship the same God.



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Notes
See The Qur'an, Surah 112:1-4, which denies that God "begat" a son. Surah 4:171 commands Muslims to not say "three" with respect to God; see also Surah 5:73. However, the Qur'an claims that the Christian doctrine of Trinity affirms that it is comprised of the Father, the Son, and Mary (Surah 5:116). The Bible, however, never attributes deity to Mary. For more on how the Qur'an understands Jesus and the Trinity, see Chawkat Moucarry, The Prophet and the Messiah: An Arab Christian's Perspective on Islam and Christianity (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2001), 184-195. Back^
See The Qur'an, Surah 5:115-18 where Jesus is reported to have denied his own deity; see also Surah 9:30-31. Back^
See Harold Netland, Dissonant Voices: Religious Pluralism and the Question of Truth (Vancouver, BC: Regent University Press, 1997), 89-90. Back^
See the Qur?an, Surah 36:54; see also Surah 82:19. Back^
About the author
Douglas Groothuis, Ph.D., is Professor of Philosophy at Denver Seminary where he directs the Philosophy of Religion Masters Degree program. He has authored ten books, including Unmasking the New Age, Truth Decay, On Jesus, and On Pascal, as well as many publications in academic journals and magazines.




 

magomago

Lifer
Sep 28, 2002
10,973
14
76
Originally posted by: cumhail
Originally posted by: Strk
Technically speaking, Jews, Christians and Muslims all believe in the same G_d. And similar to going from Jews to Christians, going from Christians to Muslims you have another individual preaching the message of G_d (I.e. going from no messiah to Jesus and then to a new prophet, as well as demoting Jesus from messiah).

Actually Muslims do accept Jesus as the messiah and believe that his second coming is foreseen as preceding the day of judgement. They just do not accept him as being God incarnate nor in his being a literal "son of God."

And yes, all three do believe in the same God and follow the same tradition; they just differ, at times, in what they believe this God's message is and who (or what) some of God's messengers were. In pre-Islamic arabic pagan traditions "Illah" just meant "deity," and it had singular and plural forms, used to refer to multiple figures. With the coming of Islam, this was largely replaced by a form of the word that has only a singular form and that could not be pluralized: "Allah," which means "The God." But at the end of the day... the fact that there are different words, in different languages, for what we call "chairs" and "tables" and "God" doesn't necessarily make them mean different things.

Good response.

The God of alll three religions ARE the same.

Where they differ is the interpretation of this God.

Judaism and Islam share far more in common when it comes to the concept of God - ie: pure monotheism of a single omniscient God - than do Christianity.

However Islam and Christianity share far more in common when it comes to Prophet Jesus since they do not reject him like the Jews do- both recognize his virgin birth and many miraculous events that surround him (the questino is whether he did them directly, or he asked God to do it ;)). The two diverge when it comes to who the message of Jesus was directed for: Prophet Jesus in Islam came to bring the Hebrews back towards the path of God form which they strayed~ it was much more focused. That "universal message" is regarded as coming with Prophet Mohammed.
The clear divergence though is where Christians accept Jesus as God, and that for the sake of erasing our sins he must be sacrificed.

Islam says "God is God" and that Jesus was NOT crucified (rather, God raised him) and WILL return...and that Original Sin does not exist, thus "heaven or hell" simply becomes a matter of our actions in a merit based system.

Of course ths isn't to de-emphasize the importance of Jesus - he is the second most mentioned Prophet in the Quran beyond Big Daddy prophet Moses ~


All do worship the same God, but we have different interpretations as to the "nature" of this God. In the end, we all believe that the God of Abraham is the one true God, and that is the thead upon which Jews Christians and Muslims share; to deny that only shows that one wants to create seperation among people
 

JEDIYoda

Lifer
Jul 13, 2005
33,981
3,318
126
Originally posted by: Lemon law
If there is a supreme and all powerful God---he/she/it must find it beneath notice that human kind can't seem to agree on anything. If God was a person---he/she/it would be totally confused about its own nature after listening to various clueless nuts whose only commonality seems to be the wearing funny hats.

your point as usual is just blabbering nothing to do whatsoever concerning the OP`s question...
 

Aimster

Lifer
Jan 5, 2003
16,129
2
0
yes

Islam is Christianity part 2.
Everyone in the Bible is in the Quran.

Actually I think it is more like this:

Old Testament - Quran - New Testament
(Religion V1.0 V1.1 V1.2)
 

magomago

Lifer
Sep 28, 2002
10,973
14
76
Originally posted by: Aimster
yes

Islam is Christianity part 2.
Everyone in the Bible is in the Quran.

Actually I think it is more like this:

Old Testament - Quran - New Testament
(Religion V1.0 V1.1 V1.2)

Kiind of. Not everything in the Bible is in the Quran and vice versa. MANY of the stories are the same, but the Quran is more "results" oriented and not as much of a "story" like the Bible in the way of details. A lot of the details are not even really necessary to pass along the point of the story ~

A good example of this is Abraham and his two sons.
In the Biblical version, Abe almost sacrifices ISAAC.
In the Quranic version, Abe almost sacrifices ONE OF HIS SONS. Despite common belief, the Quran does not say that Ishmael was the one chosen - it states simply that one of the songs were chosen, because the actual son Chosen is irrelevant. Both songs were honored by God, and neither was "better" than the other
However the former Bibical interpretation has led me to read in my friends bible's paraphrasing that Ishmael was "second best" and simply "gets the raw end of the deal" and it makes me think.. where is the love :p

There is actually a pretty good wiki article on this, let me see if i can find it

ahh her we go:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Similarities_between_the_Bible_and_the_Qur%27an

The stories in the Qur'an often contain few details and tend to concentrate more on the moral or spiritual significance of the story.

The Quran doesn't even state the alleged names of "Cain" and "able"...it just talks about one son killing another - the actual sons who did this are irrelevant The names that Muslims use are actually those which existed prior to Islam. They could be called "steve" and "larry" for all we know ;)

although...something seems weird with the page - i remember it used to have a "bible" explanation and "Quran" explanation for each story...
 

Skyclad1uhm1

Lifer
Aug 10, 2001
11,383
87
91
Originally posted by: JEDIYoda
Christians believe that God became a human being in the Person of Jesus Christ. Muslims believe this concept to be the ultimate blasphemy. Muslims can never accept the idea that Allah would become a man to die for the sins of the world. A belief in the incarnation of God in the Person of Jesus Christ is absolutely essential to the Christian understanding of God. God became a human being so He could empathize with us, and more importantly, so He could provide salvation, the forgiveness of sins.

Of course! Why didn't I think of that! An all-powerful, all-knowing god clearly would not be able to do those things without 'becoming a human'! :roll:

First he was a human, then the Messiah story was introduced, and then he was made God... A god with a superior nonetheless, unless they removed the parts where he prayed to God by now to suit their ideas of him.
 

flyboy84

Golden Member
Jul 21, 2004
1,731
0
76
Originally posted by: Aimster
yes

Islam is Christianity part 2.
Everyone in the Bible is in the Quran.

Actually I think it is more like this:

Old Testament - Quran - New Testament
(Religion V1.0 V1.1 V1.2)

Did you get your version description wrong?

I think you meant:

Old Testament - New Testament - Quran
(Religion V1.0 V1.1 V1.2)
 

DealMonkey

Lifer
Nov 25, 2001
13,136
1
0
Originally posted by: ProfJohn
Got into a disagreement with a strong Christian lady that I know who swore that Muslims do not believe in the same god as Christians. She agreed that Jews did, but seemed to not think the same for Muslims.

Can someone with a little more knowledge give me the 411 on how this breaks down.

And to make this fit into P&N. Could the fact that many people think the same as her influence how we as a country look at Muslims?

She probably hates Muslims and will come up with all sorts of ignorant BS to support that hate.
 

ProfJohn

Lifer
Jul 28, 2006
18,251
8
0
Originally posted by: DealMonkey
Originally posted by: ProfJohn
Got into a disagreement with a strong Christian lady that I know who swore that Muslims do not believe in the same god as Christians. She agreed that Jews did, but seemed to not think the same for Muslims.

Can someone with a little more knowledge give me the 411 on how this breaks down.

And to make this fit into P&N. Could the fact that many people think the same as her influence how we as a country look at Muslims?

She probably hates Muslims and will come up with all sorts of ignorant BS to support that hate.
Christians don't typically 'hate' anything.
What they believe is that they are right and everyone else is wrong.
Which seems to be her standing on this issue.

The whole topic came from a discussion on whether she would marry someone who thinks she is going to hell. In her view a Muslim would think she is going to hell unless she converted and therefore would not want to marry one.