Dimension 8200 RAM

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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What type of RAM should I get for an upgrade? I'd like to get an extra gig, but I don't want to spend too much money if at all possible. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
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Originally posted by: Ndiin
What type of RAM should I get for an upgrade? I'd like to get an extra gig, but I don't want to spend too much money if at all possible. Any suggestions would be appreciated.


Doesn't the 8200 take RDRAM? (The 8100 does, at least...)

If it's RDRAM, then... good luck finding an affordable upgrade. 512 RIMMs are rare and expensive...
 

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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Yeah I think it does. Would it be out of the question to mix in some SDRAM, or am I just talking nonsense?
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
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Originally posted by: Ndiin
Yeah I think it does. Would it be out of the question to mix in some SDRAM, or am I just talking nonsense?


RDRAM is RDRAM. Can't mix it with anything else. (It's like putting gasoline in a diesel car... bad, bad, bad idea... though thankfully, in the RDRAM case, the SDRAM physically shouldn't FIT in the RDRAM slot, preventing you from doing it... )

i850 boards have dual-channel RDRAM, which is a bit different from dual-channel DDR. You have to install RIMMs in identical pairs, and fill the other bank with continuity RIMMs if it's not used.

If you want to add an extra gig, that's 2x512 RIMMs, assuming you have a free bank. At that point, you might as well start considering replacing the thing with a cheap DDR system...
 

slackwarelinux

Senior member
Sep 22, 2004
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Upgrading to a gigabyte of RAM would require two matched 512MB sticks, each costing $346. This would total at about $700.

At this price you can build a brand new AMD64 computer with 1GB of RAM.

You decide :)
 

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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Well that sucks... guess I'll have to put this off for a while.

Thanks for the help though.
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
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Originally posted by: slackwarelinux
Upgrading to a gigabyte of RAM would require two matched 512MB sticks, each costing $346. This would total at about $700.

How much is a 256 meg PC800 RIMM worth on the used market? I, like the OP, have an RDRAM system, and if they're worth quite a bit, I might consider taking this system apart and selling it instead of keeping it... (planning on getting an X2 rig as a replacement anyways)
 

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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hey now that's an idea, that might offset the cost of replacing the mobo and processor...
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
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Originally posted by: Ndiin
hey now that's an idea, that might offset the cost of replacing the mobo and processor...


What kind of processor do you have in there now?

If it's a Northwood, then you can pick up an i865 board, some DDR RAM, and a new case/PS (I think the 8200 is one of those Dells with non-standard power supplies), and reuse your existing CPU/video card/HD/etc. That'd be the lowest budget alternative...
 

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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I'm not sure, it's a P4 2.26 GHz, but I figure if I'm already going through all the trouble to replace all this stuff, I might as well get a new processor too. Maybe an Athlon 64 3700. It'd be like a brand new computer. Maybe 2 gigs of RAM... that's starting to sound really good...
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
486
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2.26GHz has to be Northwood socket 478... IIRC, the Willamettes topped out at 2.0GHz in both socket 423 and 478.

If you're getting a new processor too, then you'll probably be looking at a new (PCI-E) video card as well...
 

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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Well I'm using a GeForce Ti 4600 right now, I would've thought that would be fairly easy to move over...
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
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That's AGP... If you're moving over to another AGP board, it's obviously quite easy to move over :)

But if you're looking towards the future, that's the (incompatible) PCI-E...
 

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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ah, I haven't really been keeping up with the latest trends... you may have noticed ;)
 

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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Right now I'm thinking this proc/mobo looks pretty good. Probably not the best motherboard, but it keeps the AGP slot and isn't very expensive (so it wouldn't be a huge loss if I had to replace it later in another year or two).

The other thing is I'm in college now, so I'm on a tight budget, but I'm sure this would last me until well after I graduated, at which point I'd be able to afford a little more.
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
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Don't forget the need for a new case and PS, unless someone can confirm the 8200 doesn't have the infamous proprietary Dell case/PSs... (I think the newest Dells dropped those, but the 8200 is a bit old...)
 

Ndiin

Junior Member
Nov 10, 2005
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Is there any way to figure that out, short of plugging in the new motherboard?
 

dexvx

Diamond Member
Feb 2, 2000
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Dimension 8200 takes PC800 RDRam, either -40 or -45ns, doesn't matter if you mix and match. The reason its so expensive new is because they are not in production anymore. Go look on eBay.

I briefly searched the completed listings, and 1 GB (2x 512MB) goes from $150-200, not $700. 512MB (2x 256MB) goes from $60-$90. The Dimension 8200 has 4 memory slots, meaning that if you purchased it new without upgrading it, chances are that you have 2 empty slots (technically not empty because it needs a terminator).
 

EagleEye

Senior member
Nov 5, 2005
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You can probably buy PC800 RDRAM for around $100 for 2x 256 mb. There is a lot more of it floating around than the PC1066 RDRAM which is used in the 8250 which I know goes for $140-170 for 512 mb pair.

EDIT: BTW i am talking about ebay prices.
 

VivienM

Senior member
Jun 26, 2001
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Originally posted by: Ndiin
Is there any way to figure that out, short of plugging in the new motherboard?


Apparently if you plug in a new motherboard and it's the proprietary Dell PS, you'd end up frying it...

Try checking places like PC Power and Cooling - they sell replacement Dell PSes, so they might have a list of what systems need those and which don't.
 

dexvx

Diamond Member
Feb 2, 2000
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Originally posted by: VivienM
Originally posted by: Ndiin
Is there any way to figure that out, short of plugging in the new motherboard?


Apparently if you plug in a new motherboard and it's the proprietary Dell PS, you'd end up frying it...

Try checking places like PC Power and Cooling - they sell replacement Dell PSes, so they might have a list of what systems need those and which don't.

I've done it before with an old old old Dell Dimension Pentium (I) system, it did not fry my board. Best way to check is going through the whitepapers and look up the PSU pin configurations. If they match that of a standard ATX, then its probably a standard ATX.

You have a newer Dimension 8200 (with a 533FSB Northwood chip, assuming you didnt replace the CPU), chances are its probably a standard ATX.