Desert Rose: Khadafy's Confession

Dari

Lifer
Oct 25, 2002
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38
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Despite desperate attempts by President Bush's critics to spin things their way, Friday's stunning announcement that Libyan dictator Moammar Khadafy has agreed to abandon his weapons of mass destruction programs is a remarkable vindication of the Bush Doctrine.
After nine months of secret talks, Khadafy admitted what he'd long denied: Libya has actively pursued nuclear and other mass-destruction weapons - and his nuclear program was more advanced than had been suspected.

He not only renounced such weapons and agreed to their destruction, he invited inspectors into his country to verify compliance; the first checks of Libyan nuclear sites by the International Atomic Energy Agency could begin next week.

The timing of Khadafy's conversion is worth noting: It began in March, just as the U.S.-led Coalition was poised to invade Iraq to finally enforce U.N. resolutions demanding verified disarmament.

And it was initiated not by Washington but by Khadafy - who clearly appreciated, even as Saddam Hussein did not, that Bush does not make idle threats.

Also worth noting: Khadafy did not approach the appeasement-minded United Nations or European Union with an offer to negotiate.

He went directly to the United States and Great Britain.

Yes, intense diplomacy produced this striking result - but only when accompanied by a genuine incentive in the form of an international campaign against terror-sponsoring regimes.

The carrot, in other words, only worked when used along with a stick.

Clearly, these talks were a major factor in the administration's willingness to let Khadafy buy his way out of being held fully responsible for the 1988 bombing of Pan Am 103 over Lockerbie.

At the time, the deal seemed like nothing less than rewarding terror. Whether it was the right move remains to be seen: Khadafy must accompany his new-found openness on WMDs with similar moves on terrorism.

That means not just renouncing terrorism or halting any links to terrorist groups. It means actively aiding the U.S.-led War on Terrorism by disclosing everything he and his government know about the international terrorist menace.

Then - and only then - might Khadafy be able to stake a claim to joining the international community and justify a complete end of economic sanctions.

Still, the Khadafy development is just the latest in a series of foreign-policy successes achieved by the president.

Last month, Iran agreed to stop enriching uranium, which provides the basic fuel of nuclear weapons. The deal will be hard to enforce, but it's still the first time the mullahs have ever voluntary committed to curbing their troubling nuclear program.

The cooling of tensions between nuclear powers India and Pakistan - and the willingness of the international community to aid the rebuilding of Iraq - represent more significant triumphs.

So.

Does Howard Dean really believe that the America is not safer today because of Bush administration foreign policy?

If the answer is yes, he's either naive in the extreme - or just plain loopy.

Either way, it speaks volumes about his fitness for the presidency.

That said, however, this week's heightened terrorist alert is a sobering reminder that "safer" doesn't mean "safe" - and that the War on Terror remains a long, hard battle that is going to be with us for far longer than any of us would like.

America is not out of the woods yet.

But, as Khadafy's dramatic announcement suggests, the good guys are most definitely winning.

 

daclayman

Golden Member
Sep 27, 2000
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Still, the Khadafy development is just the latest in a series of foreign-policy successes achieved by the president.
We distort, you deride.

This is good news, but spun elephant-style nonetheless.

The US may have bought Libya with a portion of that $87 billion.
 

Dari

Lifer
Oct 25, 2002
17,134
38
91
Originally posted by: daclayman
Still, the Khadafy development is just the latest in a series of foreign-policy successes achieved by the president.
We distort, you deride.

This is good news, but spun elephant-style nonetheless.

The US may have bought Libya with a portion of that $87 billion.
Simply amazing
 

Red Dawn

Elite Member
Jun 4, 2001
57,530
3
0
Originally posted by: Dari
Originally posted by: daclayman
Still, the Khadafy development is just the latest in a series of foreign-policy successes achieved by the president.
We distort, you deride.

This is good news, but spun elephant-style nonetheless.

The US may have bought Libya with a portion of that $87 billion.
Simply amazing
What's the Bush Doctrine, if you don't do what we say we'll invade you? Do you really believe the Libya thinks that Bush would get the support of the American public for a preemptive war with Libya? Frankly I feel that Libya has been a nuetered dog for at least a decade due to being ostracized by most of the world community. Also for the last decade Khadafy has been trying to change his image in the eyes of other African Nations as a prominent leader and upper statesman for that region. This move would go a long way in helping him achieve that image plus the economic gains Li=bya would reap from this move makes more sense that continuing down the road of being a Rogue State.
 

maluckey

Platinum Member
Jan 31, 2003
2,933
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Since Reagan shut him up, Khadafy has been trying to be a good boy so to speak. Sure, he still isn't up to western standards.....yet, but soon enough Disney Oasis will be coming to a Libyan town near you!
 

EagleKeeper

Discussion Club Moderator<br>Elite Member
Staff member
Oct 30, 2000
42,591
5
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He is also the last of the original Arab leaders from the Cold War.

He has the chance to try to lead the Pan-Arab banner. As a rebel, challenging the US has not helped his standing, now he can try to gain status through statesmanship.
 

rahvin

Elite Member
Oct 10, 1999
8,475
1
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I really don't understand how anyone can attribute the actions of Libya to anyone but Regan. Khadafy has been trying to work up the courage to renounce his demons for a decade. He's been taking nice slow small steps so he doesn't lose face with his people or the Arab world. Libya became a non-threat right after Regan bombs Khadafy's house and got the world to impose sanctions.
 

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