Deciding on a Processor With or Without Intel Clear Video HD Technology

elessarjd

Junior Member
Mar 6, 2013
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#1
I'm building a small HTPC for my living room, only intend to play MKVs and stream HD content from Netflix and the like.
I'm trying to decide between an Intel Core i3-3225 ($133) or go budget with it and get an Intel Celeron G555 ($54).
From all of my research, it seems the Celeron is more than capable of handling 1080p content, locally or streamed. The only thing stopping me from settling on it is the i3 has Intel Clear Video HD Technology...
Intel Clear Video Technology (from wiki)
According to Intel, Clear Video Technology enables; Enhanced high-definition video playback, Sharper images, Precise color control, and Advanced display capability.
Intel Clear Video Technology Features and benefits:

  • MPEG-2 decode iDCT + motion compensation. Up to 2 stream support (1 HD and 1 SD)
  • De-interlacing Advanced pixel adaptive (SD/HD-1080i)
  • Color control ProcAmp: brightness, hue, saturation, contrast.
  • Video scaling 4x4 scaling
  • Digital Display Support (through SDVO) Digital Video Interface (DVI), High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI)
  • Display support RGB (QXGA), HDMI, UDI, DVI, HDTV (1080i/p, 720p), Composite, Component, S-Video (via Intel Serial Digital Video Out), TV-out, CRT
  • Aspect ratio 16:9, 4:3, letterbox
  • Maximum resolution support 2048 x 1536 at 75 Hz, RGB (QXGA)
I can find next to no personal accounts on how good this tech is or if it's just marketing flair. I have no idea if playback software must support it to benefit from it or not. I've seen a couple people in forums claim it's significantly better. It's really frustrating that no real world information is available about this tech. If what they say it does is true, it should be important to most HTPC enthusiasts. I just can't validate Intel's claims as of yet. Thoughts?
 

kornphlake

Golden Member
Dec 30, 2003
1,554
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#2
To me I see the most of the benefits as bells and whistles in the video driver control panel. Stuff most people set and forget and likely wouldn't miss if the option wasn't there at all. I know the celeron processors support HDMI and DVI monitors without Clear Video HD support, so I'm not sure what all that mumbo jumbo is about. To me it looks like a lot of marketing double speak for "this one has a higher number so it's better."
 

Binky

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
4,046
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#3
Sounds like marketing BS. If the computer case allows for it, the celeron plus a ~$50 vid card will likely outperform the i3.

I've never been 100% happy with the onboard video. My issues are primarily the video resizing when I turn on/off the TV and receiver (there are hacks/fixes for this, I think), and also a slight choppiness in media Browser menus with onboard video. I've tried an i3-2100 and an i3-2105.
 

Charlie98

Diamond Member
Nov 6, 2011
5,941
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#4
If the computer case allows for it, the celeron plus a ~$50 vid card will likely outperform the i3.
I would tend to agree with that... sort of. I have a Pentium G620 in mine and experienced image tearing or choppiness in Netflix playback using the HD1000 iGPU; I got a Diamond HD6450 ($20AR on sale!) and while it improved streaming from files, the issues with Netflix remained. I believe, after reading some about it, that the issues lie with Netflix, not my HTPC.

Having said that, in lieu of a Celeron, maybe meet the i3 halfway with a Pentium G2020 or, if you can find one on sale, a G850 (HD2000 graphics.)
 
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2timer

Golden Member
Apr 20, 2012
1,803
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#5
To me I see the most of the benefits as bells and whistles in the video driver control panel. Stuff most people set and forget and likely wouldn't miss if the option wasn't there at all. I know the celeron processors support HDMI and DVI monitors without Clear Video HD support, so I'm not sure what all that mumbo jumbo is about. To me it looks like a lot of marketing double speak for "this one has a higher number so it's better."
+1. I agree.

Get the G555 first. And if you don't like it, you can always upgrade later.
 

thestrangebrew1

Platinum Member
Dec 7, 2011
2,664
26
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#6
The G850 has worked very well in my 2nd htpc. I'd recommend that anytime. I'm using an i5 2400 AND a 6450 and it's overkill in my main htpc.
 

Jimmah

Golden Member
Mar 18, 2005
1,243
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#8
I have a G540 in mine, more then enough to watch any video format at any resolution (on standard HDTV's).
 

wirednuts

Diamond Member
Jan 26, 2007
7,121
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#9
reading through those features, im not sure any of them are new from previous generations.
 

juiio

Golden Member
Feb 28, 2000
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#10
I tried using the integrated graphics in the i3-3225 in my HTPC and the video quality was absolutely awful. I quickly dropped in a cheap video card and the difference was night-and-day.
 

wirednuts

Diamond Member
Jan 26, 2007
7,121
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#11
I tried using the integrated graphics in the i3-3225 in my HTPC and the video quality was absolutely awful. I quickly dropped in a cheap video card and the difference was night-and-day.
:/ ? must have been a driver or codec issue....
 

Binky

Diamond Member
Oct 9, 1999
4,046
0
81
#12
I tried using the integrated graphics in the i3-3225 in my HTPC and the video quality was absolutely awful. I quickly dropped in a cheap video card and the difference was night-and-day.
You had other issues.
 

ty1er

Senior member
May 14, 2004
807
0
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#13
Yes,

I agree with wirednuts and Binky.

If your running xbmc have DXVA enable you need to shut off all the extras BS in the intel drivers that muck up your video.

Intel Drivers under "Media" tab,
-Image Enhancement,
Uncheck, Adaptive Contrast Enhancement, Film Mode Detection, Skin Tone Enhancement.
 

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