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Question DDR4 3200 (on Hand) vs. 2933 (Specified) and a 10900K CPU

RhoXS

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Aug 14, 2010
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I have four 8 GB DDR4 3200 memory sticks on hand. I am planning a new Intel I9-10900K build using an Asus z490m Plus mobo.

The memory specification Intel publishes for the memory to be used with the 10900K is DDR4-2933,

Can I assume the DDR4-3200 sticks I have are faster than the specified DDR4-2933 and will take no performance hit using them?

My instinct tells me what appears obvious might not necessarily be the case.
 

RhoXS

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Aug 14, 2010
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You need to enable XMP, that will allow you to run the sticks at 3200.
Will that maintain the same high stability I would expect if everything ran at its specified rating or is that, in a way, overclocking other components?

Although I want a machine as fast as I can reasonably build, I need it to be very stable and that precludes overclocking anything.
 

VirtualLarry

Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
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Running XMP is technically overclocking, and in doing so, may adjust Power Limits or enable MCE in BIOS too, which in turn overclocks the CPU and not just the RAM.
 

RhoXS

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Aug 14, 2010
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I would expect the DDR4-3200 RAM I already have to be a no compromise substitute for the Intel specified DDR4-2933 without running anything overclocked or other than its nameplate speed. My only question is to verify this as I don't mind buying new DDR4-2933 RAM but prefer not to if what I have now will work just as well.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
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Will that maintain the same high stability I would expect if everything ran at its specified rating or is that, in a way, overclocking other components?

Although I want a machine as fast as I can reasonably build, I need it to be very stable and that precludes overclocking anything.
I've never heard of anyone having problems running at 3200. You could even go higher although you get dimishing returns beyond 3200.

Now it could increase power limits but that shouldn't threaten stability.
 

mpo

Senior member
Jan 8, 2010
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Check out the QVL (qualified vendor list) for the motherboard or your RAM. If there is overlap, it is very likely you will be able to run your RAM at the advertised speeds. QVLs take a lot of the guesswork out of these sorts of questions.
 

RhoXS

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Aug 14, 2010
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Thanks jpiniero. I do not intend to run at 3200, only at the Intel specified 2933 for the I9-10900K. I must have a machine s stable as possible and that precludes any overclocking. That precludes enabling XMP. I enjoy building and having a machine as fast as the current reasonably available hardware defaults to, but I cannot take a risk and push the machine beyond that. Intuitively, using faster RAM than needed seems like it would easily run a the lower speed but I just wanted to be sure there was no arcane reason why it might run slower than than expected.
 

jpiniero

Diamond Member
Oct 1, 2010
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TBH I think the main reason Intel doesn't officially support JEDEC 3200 is because they want people to buy Z.
 

RhoXS

Member
Aug 14, 2010
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G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2X8GB)
F4-3200C16D-16GVK

From the label on the sticks:
PC4-25600 DDR4-3200 CL16-16-16-36 1.35V Intel XMP 2.0 Ready

32 GB (four sticks) are currently installed in a Asus Z170M Plus mobo with an Intel I7-6700K. Even though the G.Skill label states "XMP 2.0 Ready", I cannot enable XMP as it will not even boot and any manual change above the default DDR4-2133 MHz becomes unstable. I cannot tolerate an unstable machine but the machine is very noticeably snappier if I experiment with higher settings.
 

UsandThem

Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 4, 2000
13,689
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Man, I've run four sticks of DDR4 3200 with my 6700K since 2016 with no issues. I simply went into the BIOS and clicked "Enable XMP".

Now DDR4 3200 is among the most basic concerning speeds, so I think you are overthinking this OP.
 
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Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
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Enableing the XMP should work fine, if it is not stable then you may have sticks that are not stable at rated speeds, in which case you can RMA them.
 

Oneto

Member
Apr 2, 2017
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If you don't enable XMP and just set the speed manually don't forget to set the voltage to whatever is specified for the RAM.
 

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