Question Dan'sGaming is Worth How Much?

EXCellR8

Platinum Member
Sep 1, 2010
2,980
79
126
#2
I've always questioned these things... as in, if someone were to buy them out how much would they need to pay? There's a lot of popular YT's whose net worth is in the multi-million dollar range (far more than what DansGaming is supposedly worth) but what's that based on? I'm not discrediting or challenging the figures but there are some pretty big numbers being thrown around.
 
Jun 3, 2011
10,049
134
126
#3
This is akin to "why do the kardashians make so much money".
Tou got people who have natural charisma (Pewdiepie), people who find a niche and exploit it (Equals3), and people who a single executive thought deserved sponsorships. And there's a mixture of the 3.

*sad*

Ive been with twitch since day1 when there was a reason behind the name. Genuinely great people of eSports that had great values of knowledge, disciplibe and perfection.
And then the boob streamers happened.
 

Mai72

Diamond Member
Sep 12, 2012
8,554
166
126
#4
This is akin to "why do the kardashians make so much money".
Tou got people who have natural charisma (Pewdiepie), people who find a niche and exploit it (Equals3), and people who a single executive thought deserved sponsorships. And there's a mixture of the 3.

*sad*

Ive been with twitch since day1 when there was a reason behind the name. Genuinely great people of eSports that had great values of knowledge, disciplibe and perfection.
And then the boob streamers happened.
Well anytime anything becomes mainstream it attracts hoards of idiots. Didn't Twitch ban boob streamers a few years ago?
 

Mai72

Diamond Member
Sep 12, 2012
8,554
166
126
#5
I've always questioned these things... as in, if someone were to buy them out how much would they need to pay? There's a lot of popular YT's whose net worth is in the multi-million dollar range (far more than what DansGaming is supposedly worth) but what's that based on? I'm not discrediting or challenging the figures but there are some pretty big numbers being thrown around.
I assumed that is how much money he makes yearly? As in revenue from ads, donations, subs, sponserships, etc.
 

Zenoth

Diamond Member
Jan 29, 2005
4,991
14
91
#6
Not really surprising considering the news that came out recently about how much money that 'Ninja' guy made (I was surprised though).

My memories could be blurred on that, but what I recall of the very early days (I.E. about the first year or so) of Twitch was that it was mainly, if not only a 'place about video games, for gamers'. Now, granted, I wasn't a big fan of Twitch to start with back when it was new, since I thought that YouTube already provided me with more than enough stuff about gaming if I just checked for it in the search bar. Ironically enough, it was back then that I would have been surprised at how different Twitch was from YouTube (I.E. YouTube has always been broad and wide open to all types of content, while Twitch back then really was more focused on video gaming related stuff).

However, since the past two years maybe, perhaps a bit longer I have noticed a major shift towards multi-entertainment content. It's all over the place. Sure, I suppose it can be argued that it's "still" more focused on video gaming stuff than anything else. And I guess people go there to still look for that... maybe. But it cannot be denied now that Twitch is very different than what it used to be in terms of variety (it has more, but it's definitely not always about gaming anymore). We still have streamers playing games and we can still watch big gaming tournaments. But there's also "general" life crap that nobody cares about, from some random Joe Blow guy in some remote corner of the planet going to a restaurant streaming it, or some dude walking down a street talking about how he loves Rice Crispies in the morning; to the inevitable young women with large breasts using Twitch to show themselves off while wearing skin-tight clothing and making sure there's a really deep V crack right between them to keep on the views and donations steady.

It's a bit of a cesspool of anything and everything. I don't consider Twitch now any different than just zapping TV channels and stopping on the stuff I might be interested in. However, that means more general views from more people around the world, than just video gamers. Which in turns means more potential for views, ads revenue, and of course... donations. In the end I guess it's all about entertainment "for the user", whoever you are and whatever you happen to like; chances are you'll find it on modern Twitch (but you wouldn't have back maybe 4 or 5 years ago). So ultimately for someone to be a multimillionaire out of streaming on Twitch (or combining it with YouTube) shouldn't be too surprising anymore.

What does surprise me though, are the people (gamers, in the cases I'm thinking about) whom apparently mostly rely on their 'humble' streams (compared to the big ones) to live off of it. I mean, stuff like streaming... say... Super Mario Maker with like 400 views (max, if even that) for freakin' 9 hours in a row? The guy might have received like $50 worth of donations that day, not sure about subscribers or ads revenue (if there's any when you start like that). I just hope that the 'small ones' who also want their piece of the cake on Twitch do have Plan B, or an actual job behind the curtain, otherwise I legit don't know how they go by even on a monthly basis with that sort of revenue.
 
Jun 3, 2011
10,049
134
126
#7
There's the thing; you can control Twitch (and to be fair, they did try to ban boob streamers) but you cannot control those who watch.
So you got high skill ... i mean HIGH skill players getting 50 views, and then a random streamer gets gifted $70k (no typo) because that's how humanity works.

The lesson here is that if you open your platform to casual users they will "human" all over the floor.
 

Mai72

Diamond Member
Sep 12, 2012
8,554
166
126
#8
Not really surprising considering the news that came out recently about how much money that 'Ninja' guy made (I was surprised though).

My memories could be blurred on that, but what I recall of the very early days (I.E. about the first year or so) of Twitch was that it was mainly, if not only a 'place about video games, for gamers'. Now, granted, I wasn't a big fan of Twitch to start with back when it was new, since I thought that YouTube already provided me with more than enough stuff about gaming if I just checked for it in the search bar. Ironically enough, it was back then that I would have been surprised at how different Twitch was from YouTube (I.E. YouTube has always been broad and wide open to all types of content, while Twitch back then really was more focused on video gaming related stuff).

However, since the past two years maybe, perhaps a bit longer I have noticed a major shift towards multi-entertainment content. It's all over the place. Sure, I suppose it can be argued that it's "still" more focused on video gaming stuff than anything else. And I guess people go there to still look for that... maybe. But it cannot be denied now that Twitch is very different than what it used to be in terms of variety (it has more, but it's definitely not always about gaming anymore). We still have streamers playing games and we can still watch big gaming tournaments. But there's also "general" life crap that nobody cares about, from some random Joe Blow guy in some remote corner of the planet going to a restaurant streaming it, or some dude walking down a street talking about how he loves Rice Crispies in the morning; to the inevitable young women with large breasts using Twitch to show themselves off while wearing skin-tight clothing and making sure there's a really deep V crack right between them to keep on the views and donations steady.

It's a bit of a cesspool of anything and everything. I don't consider Twitch now any different than just zapping TV channels and stopping on the stuff I might be interested in. However, that means more general views from more people around the world, than just video gamers. Which in turns means more potential for views, ads revenue, and of course... donations. In the end I guess it's all about entertainment "for the user", whoever you are and whatever you happen to like; chances are you'll find it on modern Twitch (but you wouldn't have back maybe 4 or 5 years ago). So ultimately for someone to be a multimillionaire out of streaming on Twitch (or combining it with YouTube) shouldn't be too surprising anymore.

What does surprise me though, are the people (gamers, in the cases I'm thinking about) whom apparently mostly rely on their 'humble' streams (compared to the big ones) to live off of it. I mean, stuff like streaming... say... Super Mario Maker with like 400 views (max, if even that) for freakin' 9 hours in a row? The guy might have received like $50 worth of donations that day, not sure about subscribers or ads revenue (if there's any when you start like that). I just hope that the 'small ones' who also want their piece of the cake on Twitch do have Plan B, or an actual job behind the curtain, otherwise I legit don't know how they go by even on a monthly basis with that sort of revenue.
Twitch is now owned by Amazon. The plus is they have the money now to take risks, and to try new things. The downside is it's Amazon. They can always pull the plug on Twitch, or take it in a different direction, or Twitch can easily lose its identity. I've also noticed the change Twitch has made, and tbh I dislike it. I know why they are doing what they are doing, but they run the risk of diluting their brand. When you try to be everything you run the risk of alienating your core fans. Twitch was strictly a gaming channel. PERIOD. Now, we have cooking shows, music, etc.

About the streamers who stream all day for meager earnings. They are either living at home, or they are streaming when they get home from work. Streaming can be a full time job for sure. Don't forget that you have to market yourself as well. FB, YT, Instagram, and Twitch. It's not easy. Good things can come out of streaming though. A few years ago I watched a streamer called SuperBadJuju. Had a small following. He never got big, but what he got was a job in the gaming industry. He doesn't stream at all anymore, because he's constantly working. It's an uphill battle though. Only about 0.00001% will ever have the chance to be Ninja. But, if you can eek out a nice living than IMO that's a victory. Especially if it's doing something that you love.
 

EXCellR8

Platinum Member
Sep 1, 2010
2,980
79
126
#9
A few well-known YT streamers also do tours and are active in other types of entertainment too so there's certainly some funding now that they've made a name for themselves. I read an article last year about how cutthroat the streaming scene is though and how there's a constant demand for new content every day. A lot of popular streaming personalities were having a real hard time balancing their lives and considered quitting outright. Having said that, it's certainly not an easy or relaxing job outside of the actual end product media that you're watching.

I'll link that article if I can find it again.
 

quikah

Platinum Member
Apr 7, 2003
2,893
14
106
#10
Well anytime anything becomes mainstream it attracts hoards of idiots. Didn't Twitch ban boob streamers a few years ago?
No, there is no nudity or sexually suggestive activity, but a low cut top/bikini are allowed. There are plenty of streamers to choose from if that is what you are looking for.
 

Merad

Platinum Member
May 31, 2010
2,585
2
81
#11
I've always questioned these things... as in, if someone were to buy them out how much would they need to pay? There's a lot of popular YT's whose net worth is in the multi-million dollar range (far more than what DansGaming is supposedly worth) but what's that based on? I'm not discrediting or challenging the figures but there are some pretty big numbers being thrown around.
I would say it's actual money that they've been paid. I sometimes watch another streamer, CohhCarnage, who's a bit more popular than Dan. Don't know about net worth, but the last I heard Cohh had upwards of 15k subscribers - that's upwards of $500 grand in yearly income just from subscribers. In addition they get cheers and tips. I'm just guessing based on watching him, but I wouldn't be surprised if Cohh averages at least $500 per day from those (almost $200k a year). On top of that popular streamers usually have contracts with sponsors, and they do events where they get paid to try out a game for a few hours, or things like that. I would hazard a guess that Cohh's total income from streaming is approaching $1 million a year.
 

Mai72

Diamond Member
Sep 12, 2012
8,554
166
126
#12
I would say it's actual money that they've been paid. I sometimes watch another streamer, CohhCarnage, who's a bit more popular than Dan. Don't know about net worth, but the last I heard Cohh had upwards of 15k subscribers - that's upwards of $500 grand in yearly income just from subscribers. In addition they get cheers and tips. I'm just guessing based on watching him, but I wouldn't be surprised if Cohh averages at least $500 per day from those (almost $200k a year). On top of that popular streamers usually have contracts with sponsors, and they do events where they get paid to try out a game for a few hours, or things like that. I would hazard a guess that Cohh's total income from streaming is approaching $1 million a year.
That's crazy, but in a good way. If you would had told me that gamers would be getting paid $1m plus to do what they love, I'd tell you that you are nuts. I''ve been watching Fatal1ty stream lately. I know he made about $500k during his run as a Quake, Painkiller champ from the late 90s to mid 2000s. He was smart though. Instead of buying a lambo and going broke, he reinvested some of it back into motherboards, headsets, etc. I think he lives a very modest lifestyle, and because of that will probably never have to work ever. Unlike some of these other intenet guys. i watch a guy on YT named Tanner J Fox. He made his money selling Amazon courses. At $500 a pop he was making like $20-30k a month. He just bought a lambo for like $300k at 23. he said his payments are $3k a month. Things can go so bad so quickly. Invest that money, so you never have to worry. And, live a modest live. I get it though. It's so hard to watch spending when you come across a lot of money at such a young age.
 

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