Custom vinyl records

Nov 7, 2011
14,576
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gilramirez.net
#1
Anyone ever use a service to make custom vinyl records? Ever since getting my first turntable in December I’m interested in porting some of my favorite CD’s/tunes to vinyl. Have been looking at sites like https://www.freestyle-vinyl.com/ they’re not exactly cheap.

Thoughts/experiences?
 

herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
6,568
53
106
#2
i find, if things are not mixed from the start with the intention of being on vinyl, they sound like crap.
 

snoopy7548

Diamond Member
Jan 1, 2005
3,257
368
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#3
Converting CDs to vinyl will just result in a vinyl that sounds like a CD; you can't magically get analog information from digital that isn't there. Seems like a service catering exclusively to hipsters.
 
Oct 18, 1999
20,775
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#4
What's the point? You gain nothing and lose everything.
 

spikespiegal

Golden Member
Oct 10, 2005
1,219
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#5
Most vinyl records are cut from digital masters anyways. It's like all the analog film freaks scanning film with their dSLR and claiming how much better the film is than digital.

Note I say "most". There are some studios trying to go back to direct analog lathe masters, but it isn't easy. Sony is trying to do it. I've heard some vinyl recordings from some of the smaller studios using entirely analog gear from mic to vinyl and most are really, really bad because they don't know what they are doing.
 
Jun 17, 2005
11,293
441
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#6
Most vinyl records are cut from digital masters anyways. It's like all the analog film freaks scanning film with their dSLR and claiming how much better the film is than digital.

Note I say "most". There are some studios trying to go back to direct analog lathe masters, but it isn't easy. Sony is trying to do it. I've heard some vinyl recordings from some of the smaller studios using entirely analog gear from mic to vinyl and most are really, really bad because they don't know what they are doing.
That is why the good records are old.
 

rstrohkirch

Golden Member
May 31, 2005
1,522
33
91
#7
Most vinyl records are cut from digital masters anyways. It's like all the analog film freaks scanning film with their dSLR and claiming how much better the film is than digital.
This isn't true, at least in the sense that implying the final copy is identical between each media. A lot of main stream artist vinyls have much less compression then the CD counterpart. Even something like a Lady Gaga or Marilyn Manson vinyl is going come in with 3-4db more dynamic range then the same release on CD.

I'm not one who falls into the vinyl/analogue camp. I'm perfectly happy with digital. But, vinyl records DO get better masters more often then not and those differences are noticeable if you have good equipment and a quality pressing. In regards to the topic, I agree with whoever said that's a hipster money sink.
 
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sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
74,693
396
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#8
This isn't true, at least in the sense that implying the final copy is identical between each media. A lot of main stream artist vinyls have much less compression then the CD counterpart. Even something like a Lady Gaga or Marilyn Manson vinyl is going come in with 3-4db more dynamic range then the same release on CD.

I'm not one who falls into the vinyl/analogue camp. I'm perfectly happy with digital. But, vinyl records DO get better masters more often then not and those differences are noticeable if you have good equipment and a quality pressing. In regards to the topic, I agree with whoever said that's a hipster money sink.
Why would a medium with lower dynamic range get a better master?
 

rstrohkirch

Golden Member
May 31, 2005
1,522
33
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#9
Why would a medium with lower dynamic range get a better master?
Because it's assumed the buyers of each are different with different expectations.

You can browse through this database if you've never seen it and look at stuff you like. Compare the same albums in CD vs Vinyl or even old CDs vs "Remastered" copies. Like I mentioned, for vinyl you still need a good pressing and quality equipment.

http://dr.loudness-war.info/
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
74,693
396
126
#10
Because it's assumed the buyers of each are different with different expectations.

You can browse through this database if you've never seen it and look at stuff you like. Compare the same albums in CD vs Vinyl or even old CDs vs "Remastered" copies. Like I mentioned, for vinyl you still need a good pressing and quality equipment.

http://dr.loudness-war.info/

Where is the corresponding vinyl measurent for the first entry River Deep Mountain High?

This says there are at least 75 versions
https://www.discogs.com/Ike-Tina-Turner-River-Deep-Mountain-High/master/103285
 

rstrohkirch

Golden Member
May 31, 2005
1,522
33
91
#11
They don't have one for that album on there. But you picked a good example of how even different CD copies can have different levels of compression. With new releases almost always being much worse.

Here is the search for the album: http://dr.loudness-war.info/album/list?artist=&album=river+deep

This gives us three entries. You can click on each entry to get details like catalog number that you can use Discogs to reference. The one with the worst compression is a 2011 US release. The one with the best compression was originally released in 1986 and re-released later on. The one in the middle was another US release but from Mobile Fidelity Sound Labs...who make alterations to masters anyway so I don't think they count.

You should easily be able to tell the difference even on average equipment of the 2011 CD vs the 1986 CD. Some of the tracks have a difference of over 6db of dynamic range.
 

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