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Covidiots thread

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MichaelMay

Senior member
Jun 6, 2021
279
258
96
I'm not sure what your background is but, I think I'll trust Sir Andrew Pollard a little more than another "internet expert".

In a parliamentary panel on Tuesday, Professor Sir Andrew Pollard warned that herd immunity is a “mythical” concept and should not inform the design of vaccination programmes in the UK or across the globe.

“This virus is not measles – if you have 95 per cent of people vaccinated against measles, the virus cannot transmit in the population,” said Sir Andrew. “But we know very clearly with the coronavirus that the delta variant will still infect people who have been vaccinated, and that does mean that anyone who’s still unvaccinated, at some point, will meet the virus.”

He added that vaccines may slightly slow the transmission process, as there is some evidence that inoculated people are infectious for a shorter period of time, but warned “we don't have anything” which will completely halt the spread of Covid-19. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/herd-immunity-mythical-goal-will-never-reached-says-oxford-vaccine/


It still appears that we will not vaccinate our way out of this and we must put more focus on treatments and alternative prevention strategies.
I'm a biochemist and a molecular biologist, I specifically use viruses to reprogram parts of DNA structures or create specific proteins. I also developed a means to turn off genes or turn on other genes, epigenetic treatments were started because of my work.

I agree with Andrew on this, but 95% is unattainable with fucktards like yourself around so that won't happen.

Can herd immunity against Covid - 19 happen, ABSOLUTELY but it needs that level of vaccination.

You see the thing here is that there are mutations to the measles as well but since there is a herd immunity it doesn't spread. Vaccines diminish the viral load spread (that goes for ALL vaccines, vaccines are not a fucking force field surrounding your body, it WILL enter your body and you CAN spread it but the viral load you can spread is minuscule in both cases and with 95% vaccinated it will be fucking nothing within ONE generation of spread).

So, should we go for that or should we rely on your ignorance of everything you are trying to understand and failing miserably to do so?
 

MichaelMay

Senior member
Jun 6, 2021
279
258
96
This post is a tour de force in failed analytical skills. I'm impressed.
Ignorance is... not all that impressive to me, wilful ignorance and the sliming out of positions previously held ... even less so.

But I know what you mean, sometimes people show ingenuity in their ways to avoid learning how reality is, in fact, real.

Still stupid as fuck.
 
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MtnMan

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2004
6,753
4,983
136
Family gets kicked out of restaurant for wearing masks, Texas

As they have an immunocompromised child, why choose that restaurant in the first place. Were they from out of town?

While on a business trip years ago, several of us went bar hopping. Inadvertently walked into a gay bar. Left quickly.
 
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pmv

Diamond Member
May 30, 2008
9,216
4,028
136
Damn, if only we'd been able to deploy a Tucker Carlson or a Fox News during the revolutionary war, we'd never have lost the colonies. One Tucker would have been as devastating as as ten thousand Hessian mercenaries.


"The point of mandatory inoculations is to identify the sincere Christians in the ranks, the freethinkers, the men with high testosterone levels, and anybody else who doesn’t love George Washington and make them leave immediately. It’s a takeover of the Revolutionary military!"
 

gradoman

Senior member
Mar 19, 2007
828
365
136
Tell your partner, sorry for her loss. I'm not sure if it's still on the table, as a lot of COVID federal help has/is ending, but tell them to contact FEMA, they covered up to $9,000 of the funeral costs for my brother, as he died from COVID in June. You have to pay for it all and summit the receipts and stuff to get re-enbursed. My dad handled it all.
Thanks a lot.
 
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RY62

Senior member
Mar 13, 2005
831
64
91
I'm a biochemist and a molecular biologist, I specifically use viruses to reprogram parts of DNA structures or create specific proteins. I also developed a means to turn off genes or turn on other genes, epigenetic treatments were started because of my work.

I agree with Andrew on this, but 95% is unattainable with fucktards...
You actually seemed to be a person worth listening to up until this point.
 

dank69

Lifer
Oct 6, 2009
29,573
14,206
136
You actually seemed to be a person worth listening to up until this point.
Your ego will be the death of you. Nobody gives a shit about your ego except for you. The sooner you learn that the sooner you'll be free. In the meantime, reflect on the fact that your attitude is exactly the same as Breitbart's "the Dems used reverse psychology on us to kill us" bullshit.
 

blckgrffn

Diamond Member
May 1, 2003
8,233
1,504
126
www.teamjuchems.com
So I posted about my partner's cousin in the hospital with COVID a while back. It's been more than a month and he was intubated recently then died last night. Everyone is upset. My partner pleaded with her mom and aunt (mom of the cousin) to get vaccinated today, but both are still anti-vax. The cousin's sister was still posting anti- nonsense up until a few hours before her brother died.

Soon after, her profile picture and banner were all about her bro, with the typical RIP posts and then the sympathetic replies from friends and family. The mom even posted she's not sure why he had to go so soon. My eyes rolled so very hard.

When asked about what to do about the costs of a funeral in the case of a sudden COVID death, my partner's mom said she's going to start saving since she doesn't want to be a burden, but she will not be forced to get vaccinated. She has evidence that it is bad! (From a friend with Alzheimer's and the wackadoodle websites she's on)
I'll just put this here.


It's a thing no one seems to know about but seems to also exist.


Up to $9,000 in coverage but it is reimbursement. I suppose the GoFundMe's get it paid for, then you get reimbursed then you have a few bucks to try fill a hole left by passing of a COVID death when FEMA sends you the funds back. Which is never going to fill the void :(
 

Gardener

Senior member
Nov 22, 1999
518
140
116
This place is about 40 minutes south of Portland and is getting about as much publicity nationally as Portland did last year. A bunch of a white, ignorant, hateful clown shoes.
It's not so much a covid thing, but this is the same district that banned BLM/Pride flags and was also trying to buck the governors mask mandate.

Speaking of mask mandates, the old rural bumfuckville school district my kids used to attend in downstate IL tried to fuck around and find out. They tried to buck the IL gov's mask mandate. Gov came back and said "Ok, but we aren't going to honor your graduates this year or any sports games you win". They thought about that shortly and guess who's wearing masks now.
Mid-West bumfucks are far more tame than the PNW bumfucks.
 

Bitek

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2001
9,752
3,903
136
I don't want to click the play button, but it's hard to believe those words are real.

Such Small Dick Energy trying to overcompensate.

Jesus. If I hear "high testosterone man," the very last thing I think of is a bowtie wearing prep school twat named Tucker.

You know what's manly? Not bitching about a little needle and turning your kids into orphans you chittering fuck.

Real men do what they need to do to take care of their families.
 
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RY62

Senior member
Mar 13, 2005
831
64
91
I'm a biochemist and a molecular biologist, I specifically use viruses to reprogram parts of DNA structures or create specific proteins. I also developed a means to turn off genes or turn on other genes, epigenetic treatments were started because of my work.

I agree with Andrew on this, but 95% is unattainable with fucktards like yourself around so that won't happen.

Can herd immunity against Covid - 19 happen, ABSOLUTELY but it needs that level of vaccination.

You see the thing here is that there are mutations to the measles as well but since there is a herd immunity it doesn't spread. Vaccines diminish the viral load spread (that goes for ALL vaccines, vaccines are not a fucking force field surrounding your body, it WILL enter your body and you CAN spread it but the viral load you can spread is minuscule in both cases and with 95% vaccinated it will be fucking nothing within ONE generation of spread).

So, should we go for that or should we rely on your ignorance of everything you are trying to understand and failing miserably to do so?

To be clear, Andrew Pollard is on record stating that, even with 95% vaccination rate, herd immunity will not be possible. I simply shared that information.

You've said that you agree with Andrew but then immediately go on to disagree with him and say that it ABSOLUTELY can happen with 95% vaccination rate.

If you're going to contradict one of the leading experts in the world, I am very interested in how you've reached your conclusion. Are you assuming 95% vaccination of world population or is this a national model? Do your simulation variables include all of the vaccines in use nationally or, if a world model, those in use around the globe? How have you adjusted for declining efficacy rates of each vaccine? How have you allowed for transmission rates and mutations among the vaccinated populations? Higher vax rates in urban areas and lower in rural areas? What about boosters? Admittedly, I'm just a "fucktard" trying to understand something that is way over my head.

As someone with almost zero understanding of what you do, I am genuinely amazed and have the utmost respect for you and others in your field. I never argued against vaccinations. I see them as the best weapon we have at the moment but, at least for now, I still trust Andrew Pollard more than you.
 

manly

Diamond Member
Jan 25, 2000
9,241
686
126
I'm not an epidemiologist but I think you're misinterepreting Sir Pollard. Even in the absence of a vaccine, pandemics do end when the population acquires natural immunity or dies trying (realistically, a combination of both). See 1918 Spanish influenza for a prominent example. What Pollard and other Brits are saying is that COVID vaccines do not prevent transmission of the virus, so it's impossible to achieve total herd immunity against mild cases. What the Brits are also saying is that the vaccines are still very effective at preventing severe disease. Ultimately, the pandemic ends when SARS-CoV-2 still circulates at lower levels, but isn't resulting in heavy hospitalizations and deaths.

Just because Pollard is saying "herd immunity" isn't achievable isn't an argument against vaccinations. Quite the contrary actually.

It is quite apparent that in the U.S., you will likely never reach 90% vaccination of the population. But the pandemic will end; the only question is how long that will take. We will eventually have a significant portion of the population vaccinated with good immunity against severe disease; and the unvaccinated will have acquired natural immunity the hard way. The UK is in a somewhat better place than the U.S. so they will likely reach this endemic steady state before the U.S. does. Other countries, Denmark in particular, believe they are nearly or already there. Denmark never reaches this point without a successful COVID vaccination program.

This is basically a semantic argument about what "herd immunity" means. So the conclusion to move away from vaccination programs is a crock, and does not mesh with what Pollard and British experts are saying.
 
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MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
12,833
9,629
136
If we had 95% vaccinated all Covid restrictions would be over, as things stand now. If a new more intense variant came about that might change, but we'd be back to normal now
 

Bitek

Diamond Member
Aug 2, 2001
9,752
3,903
136
I'm not an epidemiologist but I think you're misinterepreting Sir Pollard. Even in the absence of a vaccine, pandemics do end when the population acquires natural immunity or dies trying (realistically, a combination of both). See 1918 Spanish influenza for a prominent example. What Pollard and other Brits are saying is that COVID vaccines do not prevent transmission of the virus, so it's impossible to achieve total herd immunity against mild cases. What the Brits are also saying is that the vaccines are still very effective at preventing severe disease. Ultimately, the pandemic ends when SARS-CoV-2 still circulates at lower levels, but isn't resulting in heavy hospitalizations and deaths.

Just because Pollard is saying "herd immunity" isn't achievable isn't an argument against vaccinations. Quite the contrary actually.

It is quite apparent that in the U.S., you will likely never reach 90% vaccination of the population. But the pandemic will end; the only question is how long that will take. We will eventually have a significant portion of the population vaccinated with good immunity against severe disease; and the unvaccinated will have acquired natural immunity the hard way. The UK is in a somewhat better place than the U.S. so they will likely reach this endemic steady state before the U.S. does. Other countries, Denmark in particular, believe they are nearly or already there. Denmark never reaches this point without a successful COVID vaccination program.

This is basically a semantic argument about what "herd immunity" means. So the conclusion to move away from vaccination programs is a crock, and does not mesh with what Pollard and British experts are saying.
Yes. I think we also need to keep in mind the definition of eradicated (eg smallpox.)

We won't be able to eradicate COVID most likely, but the virus still needs chains of transmission to keep going.

Vaccinated are far far less to be infected, so even if some are, the virus may be left to very small pockets, but largely absent from the larger population. As close enough to normal as we're likely to get anytime soon.
 
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