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Discussion Covid Booster Shot

Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
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www.theshoppinqueen.com
I was in the first wave of vaccinated health care workers, December/ January. I am part of a study at Mass General that measures cancer patients response to the vaccines. In mid May my blood level was 225 ( they use the Roche assay to measure spike protein antibody) I got my booster on 8/30 & my new level was 2,500!

Needless to say I am pretty pleased, I will of course continue masking & avoiding crowds, I need a pulmonologist but the wait times are months so we will keep my COPD in the house as much as possibLe.

Also, we got email from the head of the hospital…says many can expect 2-4 hour delays in chemo infusions. People getting Keytruda will be scheduled after 4pm. This is one of the world’s best cancer centers & this is concerning.
 

MtnMan

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2004
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Great to hear about the effectiveness of the booster. Got ours the first day the county open drive-thru vaccines.

Not sure if I understand the 2 - 4-hour delay in chemo, or the after 4PM.

Likewise, booster or not, masks on and crowds off.
 

Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
31,838
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www.theshoppinqueen.com
Great to hear about the effectiveness of the booster. Got ours the first day the county open drive-thru vaccines.

Not sure if I understand the 2 - 4-hour delay in chemo, or the after 4PM.

Likewise, booster or not, masks on and crowds off.
The email cited a lack of pharmacy techs. Also people getting immunotherapy still have functional immune systems for the most part. Keytruda infusions are also short. I get Opdivo which is probably not as popular but still need to book infusion before 10am. I am thinking they hope to separate chemo patients with weakened immune systems from the rest of us as much as possible.Keytruda is also quite heavily used these days, getting those people in & out of chairs efficiently is probably a good thing
 

MtnMan

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2004
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It seems our entire health care system is over extended, close to the breaking point is some areas, thanks to the anti-vax idiots.
 

Scarpozzi

Lifer
Jun 13, 2000
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It seems our entire health care system is over extended, close to the breaking point is some areas, thanks to the anti-vax idiots.
The anti-vaxxers have a good point though. I'm vaccinated, but until I actually get COVID, we really won't know that it didn't work.....will we?
 

dullard

Elite Member
May 21, 2001
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The anti-vaxxers have a good point though. I'm vaccinated, but until I actually get COVID, we really won't know that it didn't work.....will we?
You can get an antibody titer to find out if your vaccine worked.

I am not quite certain from your post, but it reads like you are using a logical fallacy (giving an impossible task and then saying that the vaccine failed at the impossible task). Vaccines do not prevent disease. Vaccines do not prevent Covid. So you getting or not getting Covid has nothing to do with its effectiveness. Instead, vaccines give your immune system a head start in the race against the spread of Covid in your body. This helps make the symptoms more mild, hopefully so mild that you don't know you have Covid, but that is only a best case scenario and not a guarantee.
 

Scarpozzi

Lifer
Jun 13, 2000
26,045
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You can get an antibody titer to find out if your vaccine worked.

I am not quite certain from your post, but it reads like you are using a logical fallacy (giving an impossible task and then saying that the vaccine failed at the impossible task). Vaccines do not prevent disease. Vaccines do not prevent Covid. So you getting or not getting Covid has nothing to do with its effectiveness. Instead, vaccines give your immune system a head start in the race against the spread of Covid in your body. This helps make the symptoms more mild, hopefully so mild that you don't know you have Covid, but that is only a best case scenario and not a guarantee.
You're being too serious again. My post was making a point that people are being stupid these days....I was poking fun.
 
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Feb 4, 2009
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The anti-vaxxers have a good point though. I'm vaccinated, but until I actually get COVID, we really won't know that it didn't work.....will we?
without going P&N the vaccines have been advertised and their goal is to keep you out of the hospital and keep you alive. Not make you immortal or give you 100% protection vs the virus.
So far they have worked as advertised.
 

MtnMan

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2004
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The anti-vaxxers have a good point though. I'm vaccinated, but until I actually get COVID, we really won't know that it didn't work.....will we?
On an individual basis, probably not... Just like, you can't be sure that buckling your seatbelt is going to protect you if you are in a crash.

However, the abundance of statistical data show they both swing the odds in our favor.
 
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Scarpozzi

Lifer
Jun 13, 2000
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without going P&N the vaccines have been advertised and their goal is to keep you out of the hospital and keep you alive. Not make you immortal or give you 100% protection vs the virus.
So far they have worked as advertised.
Sure....but I believe they also provide you antibodies to help battle initial viral load as well. If you limit your exposure to others by masking and not spending excessive amounts of time in close contact to others, you're going to reduce the virus you're exposed to. If you have enough of a response, you may not actually get sick at all.

My wife has been exposed to covid patients in her office for months and hasn't gotten sick yet. (knock on wood) She's typically masked, but not always. She just tries as hard as she can to take a 10-15 minute patient interview and cut to the chase. This limits exposure and reduces the likelihood she's going to get sick.
 

Geekbabe

Moderator Emeritus<br>Elite Member
Oct 16, 1999
31,838
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www.theshoppinqueen.com
You can get an antibody titer to find out if your vaccine worked.

I am not quite certain from your post, but it reads like you are using a logical fallacy (giving an impossible task and then saying that the vaccine failed at the impossible task). Vaccines do not prevent disease. Vaccines do not prevent Covid. So you getting or not getting Covid has nothing to do with its effectiveness. Instead, vaccines give your immune system a head start in the race against the spread of Covid in your body. This helps make the symptoms more mild, hopefully so mild that you don't know you have Covid, but that is only a best case scenario and not a guarantee.
I just pray the vaccine keeps this crud out of my lungs! I am being careful, masking, socially isolating when not at work. I also take my thyroid meds religiously along with my metoprolol & Vitamin D.
 
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Torn Mind

Diamond Member
Nov 25, 2012
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You can get an antibody titer to find out if your vaccine worked.

I am not quite certain from your post, but it reads like you are using a logical fallacy (giving an impossible task and then saying that the vaccine failed at the impossible task). Vaccines do not prevent disease. Vaccines do not prevent Covid. So you getting or not getting Covid has nothing to do with its effectiveness. Instead, vaccines give your immune system a head start in the race against the spread of Covid in your body. This helps make the symptoms more mild, hopefully so mild that you don't know you have Covid, but that is only a best case scenario and not a guarantee.
Multiple entities allowed the "responsible yet not fully aware" crowd to infer incorrectly that was a force field and behave accordingly though, exploiting the subconscious impression they have that all scientific statements are beyond a reasonable doubt and do not have degrees of strength in the proof that something is true.

The vaccine benefits on the collective level and especially all insurers, which includes government. The individual however, must remain prepared and vigilant for the the worst even though the chances are reduced say, from 1 in 50 to 1 in 10000.
 

PowerEngineer

Diamond Member
Oct 22, 2001
3,385
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My original shots were Moderna, and I'm gathering that may have been the most effective vaccine to get. I could get my Moderna booster now, but have decided to wait a few weeks to see if more comes out about "mix-and-match" results. I'm wondering if a booster of a different variety (e.g. J&J) could be a better choice for me than another Moderna.
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
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Waiting 2 weeks after my flu shot yesterday for Moderna booster

Just so you know the CDC says it is OK to get the Flu Shot and the Covid Shot at the same time with no ill effects.


A few things are different for the 2021-2022 influenza (flu) season, including:


  • The composition of flu vaccines has been updated.
  • All flu vaccines will be quadrivalent (four component), meaning designed to protect against four different flu viruses. For more information: Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine | CDC.
  • Licensure on one flu vaccine has changed. Flucelvax Quadrivalent is now approved for people 2 years and older.
  • Flu vaccines and COVID-19 vaccines can be given at the same time.
  • More detailed guidance about the recommended timing of flu vaccination for some groups of people is available.
  • Guidance concerning contraindications and precautions for the use of two flu vaccines – Flucevax Quadrivalent and Flublok Quadrivalent – were updated.
 
Last edited:
Feb 4, 2009
31,591
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I'm scheduled for my Booster Shot of Moderna in the morning at 10:30 AM.
Give us an update. I need to get mine done soon and the second Moderna kicked my ass big time.
Glad it was a good ass kicking, I suspect that ass kicking is why Moderna appears to protect better than the others.
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,591
11,938
136
My original shots were Moderna, and I'm gathering that may have been the most effective vaccine to get. I could get my Moderna booster now, but have decided to wait a few weeks to see if more comes out about "mix-and-match" results. I'm wondering if a booster of a different variety (e.g. J&J) could be a better choice for me than another Moderna.
Yeah just don’t over think it. This is the type thing that is easy to put off and end up with analysis paralysis which causes no action.
I have a target goal of getting it done by end of first week in November.
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,591
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Partially off topic but relevant. I am in an organization with a bunch of guys. Many whom are older.
Last Wednesday we met up, had a basic meal then hung out in a small-ish room for the dozen or so that were there.
One dude had COVID.
As of today to my knowledge no other dudes got sick. To my knowledge all were vaccinated.
Of the 5 guys I know well, we all got tested and none were positive.
Vaccination works. Yes the oldest dude who had COVID likely was vaccinated but as of Sunday he feels sick but is doing fine at home. I would guess he is around 80 years old.
 

balloonshark

Diamond Member
Jun 5, 2008
5,296
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Give us an update. I need to get mine done soon and the second Moderna kicked my ass big time.
Glad it was a good ass kicking, I suspect that ass kicking is why Moderna appears to protect better than the others.
My 71 year old mother just got her 2nd dose of Moderna this month and she didn't have any problems other than a sore arm. I really haven't heard any complaints about Moderna like we did in the past. I wonder if something changed?
 
Feb 4, 2009
31,591
11,938
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My 71 year old mother just got her 2nd dose of Moderna this month and she didn't have any problems other than a sore arm. I really haven't heard any complaints about Moderna like we did in the past. I wonder if something changed?
Same with my Parents, however the older you get the less active your immune response is so it makes sense older folks would have fewer reactions.
 
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pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
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Give us an update. I need to get mine done soon and the second Moderna kicked my ass big time.
Glad it was a good ass kicking, I suspect that ass kicking is why Moderna appears to protect better than the others.

Well here I am 13 hours later and doing fine. Nothing is sore or anything... I hope it stays that way.

I got a flu shot in the right arm and the covid booster in the left.
 

brianmanahan

Lifer
Sep 2, 2006
22,166
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nice

i don't qualify for the booster yet, but maybe someday i will

i would if i lived in england
 

pcgeek11

Lifer
Jun 12, 2005
18,690
2,385
126
Well on day two my Covid Booster arm is rather tender at the injection site. Other than that no issues, the flu shot arm isn't even sore.
 
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