Core 2 Duo overheating with stock HSF

Dec 13, 2003
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I installed my Core 2 Duo on an Asus P5B last night. The CPU got up to 67 degrees Celsius while the motherboard reached 45 degrees celsius after an hour or so of heavy installation of drivers, software. etc. I'd heard that the retail HSF for the Duo was going to be pretty bad, but I didn't think it would be this bad. Also, what's with the motherboard getting hot too? Is the heatsink on the Asus P5B bad or something? It's teh vanilla version btw.

Right now my temps are stabilzing at 62C idle and 39C for the mobo.
 

stevty2889

Diamond Member
Dec 13, 2003
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The heatsink can be a bit tricky to mount properly. More than likely the heatsink isn't seated correctly, or the temp readings are off.
 

myocardia

Diamond Member
Jun 21, 2003
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Yeah, either you don't have the heatsink screwed all the way down, or you're trying to run that system with no/not nearly enough case fans.
 
Dec 13, 2003
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I have 4 case fans so I don't think that's the problem. I probably did screw up the heatsink installation. I will try seating it again and report back.
 
Dec 13, 2003
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No improvement yet. Still around 60C idle. Does it matter which way the intel logo is supposed to be facing? I think I seated it properly this time around. I tried to wiggle the HSF and it wouldn't move at all, so I think it's on there securely.
 

imported_inspire

Senior member
Jun 29, 2006
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Arent the C2D's supposed to be cool chips? It sounds to me like the OP more than likely mounted the HSF incorrectly. Remember that thermal grease is good, but too much can actually be counter-productive. What's the ambient temperature in the room your computer is in?
 
Dec 13, 2003
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Originally posted by: inspire
Arent the C2D's supposed to be cool chips? It sounds to me like the OP more than likely mounted the HSF incorrectly. Remember that thermal grease is good, but too much can actually be counter-productive. What's the ambient temperature in the room your computer is in?

I'm using the pre-applied thermal grease that comes on the retail heatsink. I didn't do anything with it. Ambient temperature in the room is like 70F, so it's probably something I messed up with the mouting of the HSF. How can I be sure I mounted it correctly?
 

thilanliyan

Lifer
Jun 21, 2005
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Yeah I don't think idle should be 60 degrees.

What program are you using to read the temperatures??

I heard that some Asus models read the temperatures wrong.
 

Technonut

Diamond Member
Mar 19, 2000
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If you have already had the HSF installed (and heated), you will need to clean the thermal pad off, and apply new thermal compound.

Personally, I suggest Arctic Silver..... ;)
 
Dec 13, 2003
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Originally posted by: thilan29
Yeah I don't think idle should be 60 degrees.

What program are you using to read the temperatures??

I heard that some Asus models read the temperatures wrong.

I'm using Asus PC Probe.
 

hectorsm

Senior member
Jan 6, 2005
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The heat sink should feel pretty hot to the touch at 60C assuming you have attached the heat sink correctly. If not, either your heat sink is not sitting flat on the CPU or your temp sensor or not reading correctly.
 

eelw

Diamond Member
Dec 4, 1999
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If you haven't installed a 775 HSF before, it's best to play around with it with the mobo outside of the case. This way you can see how the mounting brackets work. Make sure you have the black locks showing on the bottom side of the mobo.

Also to get the most accurate temperature readings, use Core Temp instead.
 
Dec 13, 2003
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Ok well I ordered some Arctic Silver 5 just now. When I was reseating the heatsink an hour or so ago, it didn't really feel that hot to the touch, but I hadn't been running it for a long time. Also, what should I do about the motherboard? low 40C's seems a bit hot to me.
 
Dec 13, 2003
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Originally posted by: eelw
If you haven't installed a 775 HSF before, it's best to play around with it with the mobo outside of the case. This way you can see how the mounting brackets work. Make sure you have the black locks showing on the bottom side of the mobo.

Also to get the most accurate temperature readings, use Core Temp instead.

Hmm, so I should take out the mobo and install the heatsink first? I guess I'll do that when the AS5 comes. I used Core Temp just now and it gave me the same thing, 63 degrees Celsius.
 

StrangerGuy

Diamond Member
May 9, 2004
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I have the same situation as the OP. I thought replacing the original thermal grease with AS5 would decrease my load temps of 75C, but in fact it made the temps even higher to 78C, no matter how many times I reinstalled the damned HSF.
 
Dec 13, 2003
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Originally posted by: StrangerGuy
I have the same situation as the OP. I thought replacing the original thermal grease with AS5 would decrease my load temps of 75C, but in fact it made the temps even higher to 78C, no matter how many times I reinstalled the damned HSF.

lol darn. Did you install the HSF onto the mobo before putting the mobo into the case?
 

Anogar

Member
Aug 7, 2006
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Well, just for comparison:

I have an E6600, running at stock speeds, with the stock HSF. It's in a Gigabyte 965-P DS3 motherboard.

The motherboard is consistenly in the low 30s high 20s, and the CPU is in the low-mid 30s.
 

thilanliyan

Lifer
Jun 21, 2005
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Originally posted by: eelw
Also to get the most accurate temperature readings, use Core Temp instead.

Coretemp isn't ALWAYS accurate. It's saying my CPU is idling at 56degrees, whereas bios and easytune say 40 degrees and my Big Typhoon is not hot to touch.
 

StrangerGuy

Diamond Member
May 9, 2004
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Originally posted by: TheUltimateNewbie
Originally posted by: StrangerGuy
I have the same situation as the OP. I thought replacing the original thermal grease with AS5 would decrease my load temps of 75C, but in fact it made the temps even higher to 78C, no matter how many times I reinstalled the damned HSF.

lol darn. Did you install the HSF onto the mobo before putting the mobo into the case?

Nope, it is very difficult to do that without the board attached to the case. And before somebody says "you didn't follow AS5 application instructions lololol", I followed them and got loads temps of 83C, amazing! It was after I applied quite a bit more of AS5 that load temps dropped to 78C.

And btw somebody at Intel needs to be fired for designed such a POS HSF mechanism.
 

phile

Senior member
Aug 10, 2006
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If I understand correctly, the C2D chips are the first Intel chips to have temp diodes on the die itself, at the hottest point for each core. Therefore, there are 3 temps that apply to the CPU: mobo cpu diode, core1, and core2. The core temps will be higher than the familiar cpu temp reading from the mobo. For example, my E6300 temp reading from the mobo is about 30C at idle, while the core temps are about 41C. According to the Intel site, the C2D chips have a thermal ceiling of 61C, meaning stable performance is only guaranteed up until that point. As for the HSF, imo, you absolutely need to scrape off those 3 strips of thermal gunk and use something like AS5. As for the mobo temps, if you have a P5B Deluxe or a P5W DH Deluxe, you should remove the copper plates that are glued to the north and southbridge heatsinks (iirc, the P5B Deluxe only has this plate on the northbridge). These caps inhibit the proper heat dissipation from the heatsinks. You may also wish to remove these heatsinks and replace the awful crud that is supposed to be thermal paste, and use some AS5 there, as well. I got my P5W DH Deluxe's mobo temp down to 42C, from 48C, by doing the above.

One more thing, PC PROBE II is buggy as all heck, on my P5W DH Deluxe. Instead, I use Everest Ultimate to monitor all temps. The latest version can even read the C2D core temps, as well as all the expected diodes.

If you're interested in following the above procedures, heress a guide for the P5W DH Deluxe, most of which will apply for the P5B Deluxe.

http://www.xtremesystems.org/forums/showthread.php?t=106563

-phil
 

Pabster

Lifer
Apr 15, 2001
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Originally posted by: StrangerGuy
And btw somebody at Intel needs to be fired for designed such a POS HSF mechanism.

Sadly, mounting ANY of the popular hs/f today sucks. ALL the mounting mechanisms are the suck.

When I see "spring loaded clip" I know it is gonna be a PoS.
 

Henny

Senior member
Nov 22, 2001
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Something is seriously wrong. I bet the HSF isn't even making contact with the CPU. Don't rush out and but AS5 because that won't solve your problems. (it might give you 1/2 degree).

My E6600 is OC'd to 3.3 and I uped voltage to 1.475 and it runs about 25 degrees at idle and 34 degrees during "torture". (however I have a Scythe Infinity and lapped the CPU)

Even with a stock HSF you should not be seeing more than 50 degrees during load.

Try removing and reinatalling the HSF. You need to rotate the push pins according to the manual and seat them until you hear a click. Do it with the MB out of the system. Turn the MB over and make sure the black inner pin has gone all the way thru the inner housing.

If you didn't rotate the pins properly before assembly they won't lock in.

 

Kougar

Senior member
Apr 25, 2002
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I am running a E6300 Core 2 Duo 1.86ghz @ 3.33ghz easy. Cooling is a old Zalman 7700Cu with AC5, dual Prim95ing for a few hours will not push the temps above 50c, not once. If I understood Speedfan correctly the motherboard is anywhere from 31c to 37c, although Speedfan's 965P chipset support is still quite flakly, even with 4.29 released for the ICH8 southbridge. At idle this chip reads 31c. :D Vcore is about 1.36v.

Basically whatever y'all may think, I still say your stock coolers are not properly making contact. When one of you said that applying LOTS of Artic Silver lowered the temps, then that just tells me you needed more to fill the spacing gap that is there.

People can OC the E6300 to 3ghz on the stock cooler just fine without temps above 65c, so I am sure the cooler is not making proper contact. Ya might consider just finding a better cooler that mounts differently... and be sure to clean off all the old thermal compound! :)
 

Madellga

Senior member
Sep 9, 2004
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Check the new Thermalright SI-128. I got one and you need 30 seconds to install it, no tools required - just your fingers. Great performance also.