Cordless electric lawnmowers

Mar 1, 2000
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#1
I have a very small city lot (0.140 acres). My gas lawnmower starting giving me grief last season, so now I'm looking to replace it but figured I'd go green and get a battery powered one. Just easier to deal with, quieter to run (with close houses, that matters).
Just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on makes/models or things to look for etc.

Thanks!
 
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herm0016

Diamond Member
Feb 26, 2005
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#2
we had a couple of the black and Decker with the lead acid battery that worked well but the batteries did not last.

I would be looking at the echo cordless line. they have my favorite yard tools. I have the echo PAS with some different attachments and recommend them over sthil, which i have used/have a chainsaw and wish i would have went all echo.

we have an acre to take care of. I wish they would make a electric PAS powerhead for the current gas powered attachments.
 

mdram

Golden Member
Jan 2, 2014
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#3
i prefer stihl for small lawn instruments, but thats me
 
Mar 1, 2000
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#4
we had a couple of the black and Decker with the lead acid battery that worked well but the batteries did not last.

I would be looking at the echo cordless line. they have my favorite yard tools. I have the echo PAS with some different attachments and recommend them over sthil, which i have used/have a chainsaw and wish i would have went all echo.

we have an acre to take care of. I wish they would make a electric PAS powerhead for the current gas powered attachments.
The Echo is WAY overkill for this application. Damn nice hardware thought for sure.
 
Apr 3, 2001
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#5
Got a 20" brushless Ryobi 40V last year. It does the job, it's quiet, and convenient. Folds up easily so I can stick it out of the way.
 
Mar 1, 2000
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#6
Got a 20" brushless Ryobi 40V last year. It does the job, it's quiet, and convenient. Folds up easily so I can stick it out of the way.
This is actually the one same one my friend purchased. He has a similar yard and enjoys it. I'm not sure if the Ryobi has an interchangeable battery pack that can be used with a blower, weed whacker etc. Will definitely look though.
 
Apr 3, 2001
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#7
This is actually the one same one my friend purchased. He has a similar yard and enjoys it. I'm not sure if the Ryobi has an interchangeable battery pack that can be used with a blower, weed whacker etc. Will definitely look though.
I ended up picking up the weed trimmer as well, they can both use the same battery/charger (if you stay with the 40V), but the trimmer only came with a 2.6Ah battery, versus the 5Ah for the mower. Typically the 5Ah is enough to mow unless someone has been slacking and the grass has gotten taller, then I need to do a swap. Looks like your yard is around the same size as mine.
 
Nov 27, 2001
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#8
I use a Kobalt 80V mower that's really just a rebranded Greenworks mower. (Although, the batteries are not interchangeable.) The biggest problem is that they lack power compared to their gas brethren, which is fine for simple jobs, but for anything long or perhaps even a scalping, you might find it a bit annoying. I have four batteries for the mower and string trimmer along with two chargers. The front yard normally takes slightly over one battery for a normal mow; however, this past weekend, scalping the yard took around 5-6 batteries.

I'm actually considering replacing mine due to how much I hate being out in the heat. I mean... I'm a northerner in the south... it ain't pretty!! I've considered going with one of the Ryobi electric riding mowers or maybe even a Husqvarna robotic mower. The latter sounds nice because it's like being in an apartment again (no need to really mess with the lawn!), but my front and back yards are split by a fence, and that would make a robotic mower slightly more of a hassle. The Husqvarna units have GPS modules in them in case someone steals them.
 
Jul 12, 2006
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#9
I know you're looking at battery mowers, but I've used a 13 A corded Greenworks mower (and the same Kobalt version at my GF's) for the last ~5 years now, and they don't really bother me. They are relatively med-largeish yards, but you get used to watching your cord. If you have a small city yard, it should be even less hassle, and they are significantly cheaper.

Though I will say that the #1 gripe is looking like an absolute chump in your front yard, with that cord dangling from your shoulder as people drive by. ....city lot. That might be a bigger issue for you. :D
 
Nov 27, 2001
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#10
I know you're looking at battery mowers, but I've used a 13 A corded Greenworks mower (and the same Kobalt version at my GF's) for the last ~5 years now, and they don't really bother me. They are relatively med-largeish yards, but you get used to watching your cord. If you have a small city yard, it should be even less hassle, and they are significantly cheaper.
I wonder if they have more power? It certainly would be nice to avoid having to swap batteries on tougher cuts. I need to tackle my back lawn still, and I'm likely going to have to do it in three different waves to avoid the frustration of attempting a level 1 cut on tall-ish grass.
 
Jul 12, 2006
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#11
I wonder if they have more power? It certainly would be nice to avoid having to swap batteries on tougher cuts. I need to tackle my back lawn still, and I'm likely going to have to do it in three different waves to avoid the frustration of attempting a level 1 cut on tall-ish grass.
I think they do? They are rated at 13A/120V. There is the assumption of power, and also I didn't want to have to buy an extra battery in the event that I need to use 2 for a single mow. --I let the things in my yard grow pretty thick before cutting...so it needs power and takes time.

I wasn't familiar enough with modern battery tech for these kind of tools--only a really, really, really awful battery powered "leaf blower" from ~1995 that my family used, which worked for about 10 minutes of...barely able to push anything between long chargetimes.

So, all of those concerns, plus cost, I just went with the corded options. I haven't (yet) mowed over a cord!
 
Aug 30, 2000
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#13
I would assume a corded one is more powerful...about 2HP based on rating. Of course they won't tell you how many watts the cordless one will draw so you can't compare.
 
May 24, 2003
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#14
I'm kinda curious about trying one myself. Ryobi has a 18v version, which seems like a rather low amount of power for a mower, but think it takes 2 batteries. (maybe it's actually 36v and they're in series). The attraction is that I already have a bunch of those one+ batteries and they are all compatible with each other. The ones that come with the mower are higher amp hour rating but pretty sure the drill ones etc would work too.

My shed is solar powered, so I could just charge them inside and it would basically cost me absolutely nothing to run. Not that I spend much money on mowing my lawn in first place, but would just be a neat thing to know that I'm self reliant at least for that specific yard work activity. Could get the battery powered weed whacker too.

Wonder when we'll start seeing battery operated snow blowers... that's what gets the most mileage.
 
Aug 30, 2000
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#15
And needs much more power since it has to "throw" heavy snow. I don't see it being practical for a true northern climate.
 
Nov 30, 2004
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#16
I'd get an old school reel mower. They require no power aside from what the user provides, and are easy to work. They also require minimal maintenance, and have no expendable parts. Downside is when the grass needs to be mowed, you have to mow it. If you let the grass get too long, it goes from trivially easy to torturous.
 
Aug 30, 2000
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#17
You should specify a manual reel mower. I had a gas reel mower. That's a pricey beast!
 
Jul 12, 2006
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#18
I know you're looking at battery mowers, but I've used a 13 A corded Greenworks mower (and the same Kobalt version at my GF's) for the last ~5 years now, and they don't really bother me. They are relatively med-largeish yards, but you get used to watching your cord. If you have a small city yard, it should be even less hassle, and they are significantly cheaper.

Though I will say that the #1 gripe is looking like an absolute chump in your front yard, with that cord dangling from your shoulder as people drive by. ....city lot. That might be a bigger issue for you. :D
Oh so, I should update this...

Brought out my mower on Saturday for the first mow of the season: bastard caught fire within minutes. lol. housing on top of the motor started melting in. Ran and grabbed the fire extinguisher, but just hovered over it hoping that it would smother itself in the housing. It did, but she's dead anyway, Jim. All I saw was heavy smoke and of course the obvious smell of electronics melting, but clearly there was a bit of a fire going on in there.

No idea what happened. 2 years old. My guess is that storing it in the detached garage all year = moisture or maybe some animal pissed on it? Maybe I started it wet or something? no idea. Going to see if I can make a warranty or hopefully recall claim if it exists.

I guess you could say that I have abused this thing...first mow was in ~2 feet of grass. I had purchased the house and moved in at the end of March. Didn't have a mower at the time and took me some time to make a decision. Eventually got it by the middle of May, I think. I do tend to go ~2 weeks between mows during the season, but that's fine. So not sure if I've stressed the motor more than it was designed for
 

Denly

Senior member
May 14, 2011
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#19
Have a Ryobi 40V tiny mower(16" ?) from yard sale for cheap, to give you an idea it need 2 batteries to finish a 30' x 20' yard. If you're going electric go find yourself an old corded one from 30+ years ago, those thing last forever(from my exp).
 

bigi

Platinum Member
Aug 8, 2001
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#20
I've been on EGO 56V since 2015. Highly recommended. Just plug the battery and go. I did sharpen the blade on mine as it was so-so from the store.

The original battery still works as new.

I can do 0.3 acre fine. You should be more than fine with yours. AFAIK, EGO battery design is really good. Lots of other tools available as well. I own pretty much all of those - snow blower, hedger, edger, 2 blowers, chain saw, string trimmer and mower.
 
May 24, 2003
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#21
I'm kinda eyeing an EGO myself. Though my gas mower still works fine but kinda like the idea of not dealing with gas at all and be more green. I imagine it's way more quiet too right? Like could you use this at like 10pm or early morning without it really disturbing neighbours?
 

bigi

Platinum Member
Aug 8, 2001
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#22
I'm kinda eyeing an EGO myself. Though my gas mower still works fine but kinda like the idea of not dealing with gas at all and be more green. I imagine it's way more quiet too right? Like could you use this at like 10pm or early morning without it really disturbing neighbours?
Well, you can hear it so I don't know about 10PM but much quieter than gas ones for sure. Also, the convenience factor is huge. Just store it like a stroller over the winter, take out and use.

The biggest deal for me is lack of fracking gas fumes when I work outdoors. I can actually enjoy mowing.

Frankly, it boggles my mind why people buy anything gasoline propelled.
 
Aug 30, 2000
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#23
Power, cheaper, and they last longer. Oh, and zero recharge time. Sure, you could buy more batteries but that's just added cost.

I'll take my 2-strokes, you can keep your expensive batteries.
 

bigi

Platinum Member
Aug 8, 2001
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#24
Power, cheaper, and they last longer. Oh, and zero recharge time. Sure, you could buy more batteries but that's just added cost.

I'll take my 2-strokes, you can keep your expensive batteries.
Your statement is wrong in so many levels that I say - hook up the exhaust to your bedroom and call me in the AM.
 
Jul 12, 2006
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#25
Power, cheaper, and they last longer. Oh, and zero recharge time. Sure, you could buy more batteries but that's just added cost.

I'll take my 2-strokes, you can keep your expensive batteries.
corded mowers are about as cheap (and much cheaper to run), just as powerful, and have zero recharge time. ....and assuming it doesn't catch on fire like mine did after two years, probably last a good while, too. :D
 

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