Cooper IHS vs Nickel IHS CPUs

Apr 25, 2019
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#1
i was reading in aliexpress that a chinese guys sells Cooper IHS for each socket... but of course, every user will have to do it manually " first delid " and put the new cooper ihs..
i was wondering if someone test it.. and wondered why, if that solution is better, intel and amd arent doing that...



anyone tested this? 8 degrees in a server is a lot
 
Mar 10, 2004
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#2
Can't you just sand the plating off of the factory IHS?

But then Intel and AMD must plate them for a reason.
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
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#5
OP: could you please correct the title? I think you meant 'copper,' not 'cooper.'
 
Apr 25, 2019
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#6
Can't you just sand the plating off of the factory IHS?

But then Intel and AMD must plate them for a reason.
some people recommend me to plating off my i7 920, but i dont know
thanks, nice search
Yep Gamers Nexus tested that...
I'll provide some real links since I'm here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVtIjgbkE-U
thanks, checking it

edit: (second video ) just 2 degrees on ryzen, sound me more a thermalcompund thing, than the chinese cooper doing something
for example if in i7 920 ill apply 1 point of thermal compund ill have 2 degrees to 3 degrees more than applying a line around where the CPU is behind the IHS with stock cooler

lapping sounds better than buy that cooper ihs
 
Last edited:

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
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#7
Because it would be foolish to make CPUs more expensive towards a goal that only matters to overclockers.

You keep going off on these silly tangents trying to pretend that everyone should want lower temperatures no matter the cost, burden, or risk. This is not at all the case.

Most people just want a reliable product at stock speed, have better things to do with their time than fiddling with trying to eek out an additional 0.1 GHz o'c.
 
Apr 25, 2019
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#8
Because it would be foolish to make CPUs more expensive towards a goal that only matters to overclockers.

You keep going off on these silly tangents trying to pretend that everyone should want lower temperatures no matter the cost, burden, or risk. This is not at all the case.

Most people just want a reliable product at stock speed, have better things to do with their time than fiddling with trying to eek out an additional 0.1 GHz o'c.
problem is where we live, in my country max temps are 50 degrees as ambient temp, we cant even try to overclock hehe
 

mindless1

Diamond Member
Aug 11, 2001
4,645
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#9
The obvious solution is an air conditioner. All is lost if the user has to suffer 50C as a slave to the computer, pouring money into it instead of A/C.

Anything else would be madness.
 
Apr 27, 2000
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#10
The obvious solution is to live underground. Problem solved!

Seriously though, that's a silly product when you can just lap the IHS. #1 reason to lap the nickel off the IHS is to deal with the surface. I found the sweet spot was to lap to 400 or 800 grit sandpaper (not to a mirror finish) to get just the right surface consistency for TIM that responds well to lapped surfaces, like the old Shin Etsu paste I used to use (7783d I think?). Once I switched to liquid metal, I found that it really didn't make that big of a difference, though it is kinda awesome having a lapped-to-copper IHS mated to a similarly-lapped HSF with CLU in the middle. The surfaces weld together (sort of), making for amazing contact. Then you have to remove the HSF and find the two stuck together. Oops.

Anyway those IHSes often have rough surfaces, and the nickel is layered on inconsistently, at least on AMD CPUs anyway. Like it would be thicker on one part of the IHS than another. If you are going to use a product like Kryonaut or GC Xtreme or whatever, it might actually help a lot to have a hand-lapped IHS and HSF. Just gotta do it right.
 

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
3,880
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#11
What is your cooler? What CPU? What case and airflow setup? Start there.
 

NTMBK

Diamond Member
Nov 14, 2011
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#12
Copper. The word you're looking for is copper.
 
Jan 31, 2019
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#13
problem is where we live, in my country max temps are 50 degrees as ambient temp, we cant even try to overclock hehe
It works, but temp difference is like 4-5c (including liquid metal), so in simple language, its not worth at all to void your CPU warranty. Man where you live? 50c as ambient it too high. AIO pumps starts to fail at 60c liquid temp. At this temp even best PSU will give poor performance, HDD/SSDs will overheat. It will be better if you get an A/C.
 
Nov 2, 2018
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#17
Copper oxidizes easily, so I don't really see the point of removing the plating or getting a heatsink without it.
Plating is really thin and has minimal impact on heat conductivity.

You may find some results suggesting that temperatures dropped greatly after replacing the heatsink.
The reason is not the lack of plating, but the delidding itself.
Originally there's almost 1mm of TIM under the heatsink.
People usually apply a lot less of it when reassembling (or they go for liquid metal which improves conductivity even further).
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
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#18
Copper may oxidize easily, but as a reviewer, I saw a lot of heatsinks that had no plating. This was especially true of the contact surfaces of AIOs. Of course, most heatsinks come with nickel plating and they are still shiny after 10y, but a few risk the tarnish. One can see why: the part of a heatsink that is in contact with an IHS is not exposed to air.
 

Markfw

CPU Moderator, VC&G Moderator, Elite Member
Super Moderator
May 16, 2002
18,182
2,133
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#19
problem is where we live, in my country max temps are 50 degrees as ambient temp, we cant even try to overclock hehe
Its 122f where you are ? where is that, death valley ?
 

ehume

Golden Member
Nov 6, 2009
1,426
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#20
Its 122f where you are ? where is that, death valley ?
I read about Iraq. It appears that the locals initially thought our boys were machines because it can be so hot there . . .
 


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