Convert network to IPv6?

paperfist

Diamond Member
Nov 30, 2000
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www.the-teh.com
Trying to help a friend connect to his security cameras (not IP cameras) on his Hughesnet Gen5 satellite internet.

Apparently you can't do this with IPv4 as it's not publicly addressable on their system, however IPv6 is.

I don't know what's involved with this conversion, is it simply a matter of redoing it in Windows or do I need to check if all his devices are compatible with IPv6?

Unfortunately the router/modem they gave him doesn't support bridge mode. I can't think of another easy way to connect to his cameras from the outside world.

Thanks for the help!
 

Gryz

Golden Member
Aug 28, 2010
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First of all, you don't need to "convert" the network. You can run both IPv4 and IPv6 at the same time.

The way this normally works is via DNS. When a computer tries to connect to a service/server, it has the name of the server it needs to talk to. It then does a DNS-lookup to find the IP-address. If you do IPv6 and IPv4, the DNS system will respond with the answers: one called an A resource-record, and the other a AAAA resource-record. The A address is an old-fashioned IPv4 address, the AAAA address is an IPv6 address. The application then needs to decide which address to use. If it picks the AAAA address, it will use IPv6 to connect to the other party.

This means the application (both ends) need to support IPv6.
It also means you need to put an AAAA record in DNS. Or the application has to not use a hostname, but then it needs to have directly the IPv6 address in its configuration.

Besides the application, also the Operating Systems need to support IPv6 and be configured for it. (I think both Win7 and WIn10 have it enabled by default). Your router needs to support IPv6, and have it enabled. And last, also your ISP needs to support it, enable it on the link to you.

I have no idea why you would want to support bridge-mode. Normal router-mode should work just fine. (If everything else is configured to do IPv6).
 
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paperfist

Diamond Member
Nov 30, 2000
6,504
276
126
www.the-teh.com
First of all, you don't need to "convert" the network. You can run both IPv4 and IPv6 at the same time.

The way this normally works is via DNS. When a computer tries to connect to a service/server, it has the name of the server it needs to talk to. It then does a DNS-lookup to find the IP-address. If you do IPv6 and IPv4, the DNS system will respond with the answers: one called an A resource-record, and the other a AAAA resource-record. The A address is an old-fashioned IPv4 address, the AAAA address is an IPv6 address. The application then needs to decide which address to use. If it picks the AAAA address, it will use IPv6 to connect to the other party.

This means the application (both ends) need to support IPv6.
It also means you need to put an AAAA record in DNS. Or the application has to not use a hostname, but then it needs to have directly the IPv6 address in its configuration.

Besides the application, also the Operating Systems need to support IPv6 and be configured for it. (I think both Win7 and WIn10 have it enabled by default). Your router needs to support IPv6, and have it enabled. And last, also your ISP needs to support it, enable it on the link to you.

I have no idea why you would want to support bridge-mode. Normal router-mode should work just fine. (If everything else is configured to do IPv6).
Thanks for the info.

I wanted to use bridge mode so I could bypass the router functions of the ISP's device. But after some thought that seems to be useless because the ISP's modem/service is all on IPv6 and since that's the gateway to the outside world bridge mode is of no use to me.

I'll have to check to see what else is IPv6. I'll have to see if I can get a VPN to work so that he can just connect to his desktop and view the camera app.
 

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