Compatibility between 802.11g and 802.11b and gaming packet loss

dcpsoguy

Diamond Member
Nov 5, 2000
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My Router is a Linksys BEFW11S4 Wireless-B Broadband router. One one computer, I have a Linksys Wireless-B USB Adapter(which is 802.11b). It works fine. On this computer that I'm using right now, it's a D-Link AirplusG DWL-G122(802.11g). The internet works fine and everything, but when I try to play a game, such as the Battlefield 2 demo, I always get.. having connection problems errors in the game and packet loss. The signal strength is always 2-3 bars.. never goes any lower than 2. I've turned off Wireless Zero Config because there are three wireless connections around here, and my setup is only one of them. Why do I keep getting packetloss? Is it because I have a 802.11g adapter and a 802.11b wireless broadband router? Thanks a lot in advance..

P.S: I never get dropped at all from the connection, so thats not a problem.
 

dcpsoguy

Diamond Member
Nov 5, 2000
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Also, just for some information. My wireless router is downstairs.. and then upstairs (this is a normal house).. the Linksys USB adapter is in one room(the one that works fine).. and the D-Link is in another room.
 

SocrPlyr

Golden Member
Oct 9, 1999
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there might be something in between them causing the interference... also, while not absolutely necessary it is nicer to stay w/ one company w/ some of the cheap home wireless stuff (my opinion). one thing you might want to try is seeing if you can set the dlink to a B-only mode. B and G are completely different in how they use the channels, so depending your G device might keep trying for a G connection or not switching over entirely properly.

Josh
 

demon42

Member
Jul 19, 2004
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As far as I know, you can't set the client card's radio mode (such as to b-only), this setting is usually on the AP only.

First thing to try: make sure drivers are up to date on both sides of the connection.

From there, you might try using zero-config and disabling the d-link software on your computer... see if that makes a difference for better or worse.
Also, I agree with Josh, something might be causing interference: 2.4gHz cordless phones, microwaves, etc.

Perhaps you should try moving the router or computer closer to each other. It could just be a noisy environment that is causing your packet loss. Different adapters with different chipsets compensate differently to such environments.

If you have a laptop, one thing that you can do (and I think it's kind of fun) is to walk around with a constant ping on the screen and watch the response times... it wouldnt fix any problems, but it might get you a better signal.
 

spidey07

No Lifer
Aug 4, 2000
65,469
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Changing the channel to 1, 6 or 11 usually resolves most wireless performance problems. Mainly because there is interferrence.

dropping packets on a web browser you'll probably never notice. but gaming you would.