• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

Click hyperlink, go to jail for child porn

Page 3 - Seeking answers? Join the AnandTech community: where nearly half-a-million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

blackangst1

Lifer
Feb 23, 2005
20,464
719
126
Originally posted by: jjones
Originally posted by: blackangst1
Thats all true, but if people would use their right to get an attorney, I bet alot of this would go away. this doesnt fall under the unPatriot Act, therefore requires a judge's sig for a warrant. Also, it's not your job to prove youre innocent-it's their job to prove you guilty. You dont have to answer shit.
An attorney arrives after the problem has arrived, and if the problem has arrived it's not so easily going to go away. The warrant is there for the asking, the article makes it clear that getting a warrant is not an issue. And yes, they do have to prove you guilty, but your friends, neighbors and work associates don't; they can just assume you are and if you don't go to jail then you must have gotten away with it. Something like this could destroy a person's career and his home life.

I just can't swallow the idea that it's such a small matter, something to be viewed as an easily overcome inconvenience, to be under investigation by the FBI for child pornography, regardless of how far they decide to take it. And to have something as easily misused as getting someone to click a hyperlink viewed as sufficient evidence to begin an investigation just doesn't sit well with me at all. Sure it might be cleared up rather quickly, but not quickly enough that you're not going to be feeling some ramifications of having been investigated by the FBI for child pronography.

They have no way of determining where the click originated and this is what you can look forward to:

dawn raid by federal police
thrown to the ground outside house and handcuffed
seize and remove any "computer-related" equipment, utility bills, telephone bills, any "addressed correspondence" sent through the U.S. mail, video gear, camera equipment, checkbooks, bank statements, credit card statements

Follow that with being detained and questioned for many hours, then going home and cleaning up the mess. Oh, and don't forget to explain to your boss where you have been the whole day. The neighbors will be curious as well about why you we're taken off in handcuffs and your house raided. And good luck trying to get your computer or any other equipment back.

Oh, and one more thing. God forbid you're having a rocky patch in your marriage at the time. This would be just enough to ask that lawyer you hired to get you out of this mess to recommend you one for your upcoming divorce.
Well, yeah I agree. But I wasnt addressing anything but legal prosecution. Social prosecution is a different story. I saw a story a couple years ago about men (and a few women) who were falsely accused of distribution. The story showed very few search warrants actually produce evidence, much less enough to convict on. It also showed a good chunk of warrants are thrown out due to lack of due diligence to obtain the warrant in the first place. Its because were so anti-CP (which we should be). The bottom line of the story was in most cases they are handled sloppily (sp?) and never make it to trial.
 

ericlp

Diamond Member
Dec 24, 2000
6,079
186
106
I think the whole point is to this is... Since 911 we gave up many rights. They can basically do anything they want...

I what else they will try to pull? Maybe put a link up called "Click here to rob a bank" And when you do! BAM! Busted!

How about this... "Click Here to steal a candy bar!" BUSTED! When does it end?

The thought police are think in here..

 

ASK THE COMMUNITY