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Chinese Toddler Ran over and left, nobody helps.

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IBMer

Golden Member
Jul 7, 2000
1,137
0
76
I'll repost what was posted in reddit if some people haven't clicked the link:

In China, this kind of situation is referred to as the 'Peng Yu' effect. Before you condemn then, you have to understand their situation. The law right now in China means that many victims of traffic accidents, or people who have fallen ill in the street have actually successfully sued the people that helped them for sums of money that could easily destroy lives, even if there is no evidence that they are the ones that caused the accident (because they were not). There is a China Daily article on this topic.

In a country that executes more than any other, I wonder how willing you would be to potentially implicate yourself in a crime by helping a stranger. Yes, its very sad. But I, for one, find it hard to blame them in this situation. The law needs to change before people can become less suspicious.
 

Infohawk

Lifer
Jan 12, 2002
17,844
1
0
I'll repost what was posted in reddit if some people haven't clicked the link:
Who fucking cares? There is similar potential liability in the US. It's not illegal to warn oncoming traffic not to fucking run over a child again or to call people over or call the authorities. Nobody even needed to move the body although at some point that was probably the right thing to do and honorable people do the right thing even if there's potential liability.

And that's the problem with the Chinese people in this video and probably around the entire country. They are so fearful of their government (so selfish?) that they don't stand up and do the right thing. Again, doing the right thing isn't always easy. Cowardice isn't a valid excuse for being immoral.
 

her209

No Lifer
Oct 11, 2000
56,352
9
0
Who fucking cares? There is similar potential liability in the US. It's not illegal to warn oncoming traffic not to fucking run over a child again or to call people over or call the authorities. Nobody even needed to move the body although at some point that was probably the right thing to do and honorable people do the right thing even if there's potential liability.

And that's the problem with the Chinese people in this video and probably around the entire country. They are so fearful of their government (so selfish?) that they don't stand up and do the right thing. Again, doing the right thing isn't always easy. Cowardice isn't a valid excuse for being immoral.
Um, the government isn't the one that suing the good Samaritan.
 
Oct 25, 2006
11,036
9
91
Combination of above law and bystander effect. Shit like this happens everywhere.

Even in America, so don't get on your moral high horse.
 

Whiskey16

Golden Member
Jul 11, 2011
1,338
5
76
Combination of above law and bystander effect. Shit like this happens everywhere.

Even in America, so don't get on your moral high horse.
:thumbsup:

Bigotry is alive and well on this forum. ... through to wishes for the vanishing of the Chinese from this world. Apparently overwhelmingly acceptable in the society of AnanTech as I am the first to chastise that.

Yet another story propelled well beyond rational proportion all to glumly satisfy biased nationalistic self confirmation.
 
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Apple Of Sodom

Golden Member
Oct 7, 2007
1,808
0
0
How is this different than Republican indifference and scorn of folk who have no jobs. They are driving the van that runs their fellow citizens down. We don't have to look anywhere for a lack of morality and crass indifference than in the mirror.
It is different because what you are using is called a metaphor and this fucking literally happened. You are depraved. Maybe it is because you Hate Yourself(tm).

I scorn folks without jobs because I look around and see plenty of employment. Sure, it mostly starts at the bottom, but we all had to start at the bottom with a very few exceptions.
 

Genx87

Lifer
Apr 8, 2002
41,061
494
126
It is sad but many dont realize other cultures dont always share our values. My GF in highschool was from India. She told me a story once about how here sister and her were eating lunch at an outdoor cafe and a guy fell off a cart and his head was run over by the wheels crushing him. People just walked by as he laid there bleeding out while my GF freaked out.

That said we have also had instances of this within the United States or Europe. So we arent immune to a lack of empathy.
 

shira

Diamond Member
Jan 12, 2005
9,567
5
81
Government spending! Lazy poor people! Illegal immigrants! Climate scam!


Oh, sorry, wrong thread.
 

Atreus21

Lifer
Aug 21, 2007
12,007
571
126
Did the little girl survive?

I've become a sentimental pussy since having kids. This video nearly provoked tears. My daughter's almost two.
 

woolfe9999

Diamond Member
Mar 28, 2005
7,164
0
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irishScott

Lifer
Oct 10, 2006
21,568
2
0
Who fucking cares? There is similar potential liability in the US. It's not illegal to warn oncoming traffic not to fucking run over a child again or to call people over or call the authorities. Nobody even needed to move the body although at some point that was probably the right thing to do and honorable people do the right thing even if there's potential liability.

And that's the problem with the Chinese people in this video and probably around the entire country. They are so fearful of their government (so selfish?) that they don't stand up and do the right thing. Again, doing the right thing isn't always easy. Cowardice isn't a valid excuse for being immoral.
So if you're a poor, undereducated Chinese peasant trying to support your family, in such a state that you could not afford a lawyer and a single lawsuit could mean your family potentially becomes homeless or worse, is it moral to risk your family's entire well-being to help another?

It is a tough decision, and frankly I have a hard time blaming people that desperate for prioritizing their own family. Personally I'd help the kid, but I'm also in a position to adequately protect myself in the unlikely event that some idiot would try to sue me over it.
 

Infohawk

Lifer
Jan 12, 2002
17,844
1
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So if you're a poor, undereducated Chinese peasant trying to support your family, in such a state that you could not afford a lawyer and a single lawsuit could mean your family potentially becomes homeless or worse, is it moral to risk your family's entire well-being to help another?

It is a tough decision, and frankly I have a hard time blaming people that desperate for prioritizing their own family. Personally I'd help the kid, but I'm also in a position to adequately protect myself in the unlikely event that some idiot would try to sue me over it.
Why would someone sue a poor peasant with no money? It's a waste of time and it doesn't make sense. (I suspect there's a lot more to the story that in China that good Samaritans have been sued. I'm surprised how many people here are so quick to believe that it's as simple as being ruined for simply being a good Samaritan. Even the Chinese legal system is not going to be that retarded. If the stories are true, there were undoubtedly more facts than simply helping someone out.)

And as I've already said, you didn't have to move the body. You just had to stop and give a shit and try to warn traffic about the girl and call the authorities on your cell phone. It's not even like the people stopped to ponder about the moral quandary.

Here's the way civilized people behave by the way:
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/nationnow/2011/09/crowd-lifts-burning-car-off-man-eyewitness-catches-it-on-film.html
 

woolfe9999

Diamond Member
Mar 28, 2005
7,164
0
0
Why would someone sue a poor peasant with no money? It's a waste of time and it doesn't make sense. (I suspect there's a lot more to the story that in China that good Samaritans have been sued. I'm surprised how many people here are so quick to believe that it's as simple as being ruined for simply being a good Samaritan. Even the Chinese legal system is not going to be that retarded. If the stories are true, there were undoubtedly more facts than simply helping someone out.)

And as I've already said, you didn't have to move the body. You just had to stop and give a shit and try to warn traffic about the girl and call the authorities on your cell phone. It's not even like the people stopped to ponder about the moral quandary.

Here's the way civilized people behave by the way:
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/nationnow/2011/09/crowd-lifts-burning-car-off-man-eyewitness-catches-it-on-film.html
If you're going to be honest, you'll admit that you don't know that in China they don't have similar good samaritan stories as the one you link, and you don't know that the OP incident wasn't an isolated one, an exception rather than the rule. Don't get me wrong. I wouldn't be surprised if it's more of a rule. Life is cheap in the developing world. But there's no real proof one way or another. It's just an anecdote.
 

Infohawk

Lifer
Jan 12, 2002
17,844
1
0
If you're going to be honest, you'll admit that you don't know that in China they don't have similar good samaritan stories as the one you link, and you don't know that the OP incident wasn't an isolated one, an exception rather than the rule. Don't get me wrong. I wouldn't be surprised if it's more of a rule. Life is cheap in the developing world. But there's no real proof one way or another. It's just an anecdote.
What part of my post are you responding to, specifically?
 

woolfe9999

Diamond Member
Mar 28, 2005
7,164
0
0
What part of my post are you responding to, specifically?
Are you contending that you have not generalized from this incident in this thread or are you just trying to avoid my post by being technical? OK, technically, I was responding to the totally of your posts in the thread. Comments like "this is a reminder of why we should want a weak China" that this is "probably" all over the country, etc.

I think if you're going to draw broader conclusions from what appears to be a single incident then you should supply some reasons for it.
 

leonlee

Golden Member
Oct 27, 2009
1,152
0
76
This is tangential, but I've actually been to China. I've seen young people give up their seats to the elderly on half a dozen occasions while riding public transit buses. I've never seen that kind of behavior in the United States.

People are quick to judge others. Maybe you should actually visit the country and see for yourself whether your western propagandized lens on China holds true under scrutiny.
 

Infohawk

Lifer
Jan 12, 2002
17,844
1
0
Are you contending that you have not generalized from this incident in this thread or are you just trying to avoid my post by being technical? OK, technically, I was responding to the totally of your posts in the thread. Comments like "this is a reminder of why we should want a weak China" that this is "probably" all over the country, etc.

I think if you're going to draw broader conclusions from what appears to be a single incident then you should supply some reasons for it.
I'm not generalizing from a single incident. But frankly I'm not really interested in another double-standard discussion with you where you say something like "I wouldn't be surprised if it's more of a rule. Life is cheap in the developing world." but then jump down my throat for not posting a dozen disclaimers that not all Chinese people are evil or whatever you wanted.
 

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