• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

Cash Strapped Clinton Fails To Pay Bills

Pabster

Lifer
Apr 15, 2001
16,987
1
0
Story here.

Ridiculous. It's time for Hillary to bow out, now. If she can't even afford to pay the petty bills of a campaign, she's out of her league.
 

nageov3t

Lifer
Feb 18, 2004
42,816
83
91
why pull the plug when Obama can't achieve the magic number without super delegates?

I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
 

Skitzer

Diamond Member
Mar 20, 2000
4,415
3
81
Well, to be fair we should withhold our opinions that she should withdraw from the race until after the Pennsylvania primary.
If Barack beats her there it is all over.
 

smack Down

Diamond Member
Sep 10, 2005
4,507
0
0
Originally posted by: loki8481
why pull the plug when Obama can't achieve the magic number without super delegates?

I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
Because she is losing.
 

nageov3t

Lifer
Feb 18, 2004
42,816
83
91
Originally posted by: smack Down
Originally posted by: loki8481
why pull the plug when Obama can't achieve the magic number without super delegates?

I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
Because she is losing.
so why didn't Obama drop out after New Hampshire?

edit: I mean, we're not talking Ron Paul's charge of the 4% here... 60+% of democrats want her to stay in the race, and there's a decent chance she'll have a lead in the popular vote after PA.
 

smack Down

Diamond Member
Sep 10, 2005
4,507
0
0
Originally posted by: loki8481
Originally posted by: smack Down
Originally posted by: loki8481
why pull the plug when Obama can't achieve the magic number without super delegates?

I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
Because she is losing.
so why didn't Obama drop out after New Hampshire?
Because it was early in the race and he had plenty of time to change the results.
 

dmcowen674

No Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
54,894
46
91
www.alienbabeltech.com
Originally posted by: loki8481
Originally posted by: smack Down
Originally posted by: loki8481
why pull the plug when Obama can't achieve the magic number without super delegates?

I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
Because she is losing.
so why didn't Obama drop out after New Hampshire?

edit: I mean, we're not talking Ron Paul's charge of the 4% here... 60+% of democrats want her to stay in the race, and

there's a decent chance she'll have a lead in the popular vote after PA.
The popular vote has been proven many times to mean absolutely nothing.

Hell not one person in the U.S. should bother to vote, their vote doesn't count anyway.
 
Jun 27, 2005
19,251
1
61
Originally posted by: loki8481
Originally posted by: smack Down
Originally posted by: loki8481
why pull the plug when Obama can't achieve the magic number without super delegates?

I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
Because she is losing.
so why didn't Obama drop out after New Hampshire?

edit: I mean, we're not talking Ron Paul's charge of the 4% here... 60+% of democrats want her to stay in the race, and there's a decent chance she'll have a lead in the popular vote after PA.
Well... in three of the last four presidential elections the popular vote didn't matter much... why should it matter now? Bseides, she won't win (assuming she wins) big enough in Penn to change things and if she does the pop vote will still be so close as to be a statistical tie. Then it falls to the delegates and the delegates are already sitting there for Barak.

If she felt any kind of loyalty to her party she would bow out now rather than drag this out to the end. She's eating Barak's general election money by staying in.
 

dmcowen674

No Lifer
Oct 13, 1999
54,894
46
91
www.alienbabeltech.com
Originally posted by: Whoozyerdaddy
Originally posted by: loki8481
Originally posted by: smack Down
Originally posted by: loki8481
why pull the plug when Obama can't achieve the magic number without super delegates?

I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
Because she is losing.
so why didn't Obama drop out after New Hampshire?

edit: I mean, we're not talking Ron Paul's charge of the 4% here... 60+% of democrats want her to stay in the race, and there's a decent chance she'll have a lead in the popular vote after PA.
Well... in three of the last four presidential elections the popular vote didn't matter much... why should it matter now? Bseides, she won't win (assuming she wins) big enough in Penn to change things and if she does the pop vote will still be so close as to be a statistical tie. Then it falls to the delegates and the delegates are already sitting there for Barak.

If she felt any kind of loyalty to her party she would bow out now rather than drag this out to the end. She's eating Barak's general election money by staying in.
Doesn't matter how much money Barak will have , it won't be enough to overtake the Religious and Corporate vote away. MCCain doesn't even have to break a sweat.
 

Double Trouble

Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
9,272
103
106
As much as Hillary sickens me -- listening to her is like having someone screech fingernails on a blackboard constantly -- I don't see why she should bow out. If neither candidate has enough delegates to win it outright, why should she? She has as much of a right to be in it as Obamarama does.
 

fskimospy

Elite Member
Mar 10, 2006
73,164
24,757
136
Originally posted by: tagej
As much as Hillary sickens me -- listening to her is like having someone screech fingernails on a blackboard constantly -- I don't see why she should bow out. If neither candidate has enough delegates to win it outright, why should she? She has as much of a right to be in it as Obamarama does.
It's totally her right to run as long as she wants. It would help her party if she dropped out though. Considering Obama has nearly identical views to her on most policy issues, if she really cares about getting the policies enacted her best move is probably to drop out considering how unlikely it is for her to be able to win.
 

Fern

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 30, 2003
26,907
173
106
The New York senator?s presidential campaign ended February with $33 million in the bank, according to a report filed last week with the Federal Election Commission, but only $16 million of that can be spent on her battle with Obama.

The rest can be spent only in the general election, if she makes it that far, and must be returned if she doesn?t. If she had paid off the $8.7 million in unpaid bills she reported as debt and had not loaned her campaign $5 million, she would have been nearly $3 million in the red at the end of February.
Math doesn't add up. I get $2.3 million in the black.

Up til now I've been hearing that she has $3M in the bank. I don't see her NOT repaying herself the $5M.

A lack of funding would be the quickest way to finish off her campaign, and without a lot of angst too. The super D's couldn't be blaimed etc.

BTW: Talk of popular vote is flawed. It's just discounts the caucus states (except for Texas), you know, the ones Obama has a habit of winning. It's kind of ironic, the one's shrieking about FL & MI not counting are first in line to propose a method that strips other states of their valid (caucus) elections.

Fern

 

Pabster

Lifer
Apr 15, 2001
16,987
1
0
Originally posted by: tagej
As much as Hillary sickens me -- listening to her is like having someone screech fingernails on a blackboard constantly -- I don't see why she should bow out. If neither candidate has enough delegates to win it outright, why should she? She has as much of a right to be in it as Obamarama does.
Haven't heard of Obama stiffing vendors on his campaign bills...
 

Slew Foot

Lifer
Sep 22, 2005
12,381
94
86
Its kinda funny, the repubs are giving the election to the Dems on a platter for the second straight time, and it looks like theyre going to blow it again.

 

nageov3t

Lifer
Feb 18, 2004
42,816
83
91
I seriously haven't seen any proof that Hillary staying in the race is going to hurt the party in the long run.

if 28% of Hillary supporters vote for McCain... that's about the same number that deflected against Gore and Kerry, both of whom came within spitting distance of winning, and the GE after the 1968 convention wasn't exactly a route either.

it's just a shame that Obama didn't take her one remaining argument away and tried to work out a new MI primary with a half-vote or something.
 

SViscusi

Golden Member
Apr 12, 2000
1,200
8
81
Originally posted by: loki8481
Originally posted by: smack Down
Originally posted by: loki8481
why pull the plug when Obama can't achieve the magic number without super delegates?

I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
Because she is losing.
so why didn't Obama drop out after New Hampshire?
Obama tied Clinton in New Hampshire. In fact the only day Clinton's won so far is mini Tuesday.

 

SViscusi

Golden Member
Apr 12, 2000
1,200
8
81
Originally posted by: senseamp
Bow out so that Barack "Emty Suit" Obama is the Democrat nominee? No thanks.
Well sooner or later it is going to happen. The only question will be if Hillary continues to go scorched earth and damages the party.
 

senseamp

Lifer
Feb 5, 2006
35,025
5,108
126
Originally posted by: SViscusi
Originally posted by: senseamp
Bow out so that Barack "Emty Suit" Obama is the Democrat nominee? No thanks.
Well sooner or later it is going to happen. The only question will be if Hillary continues to go scorched earth and damages the party.
Nothing will damage the party like nominating Obama. Clinton staying in the race gives the super delegates a chance to save the party.
 

Starbuck1975

Lifer
Jan 6, 2005
14,663
1,887
126
I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
If she were a he, white and not a Clinton, her campaign would have been over after the Potomac primaries.
 

senseamp

Lifer
Feb 5, 2006
35,025
5,108
126
Originally posted by: Starbuck1975
I think this whole party disunity argument is a red herring Obama supporters are throwing out there.
If she were a he, white and not a Clinton, her campaign would have been over after the Potomac primaries.
Tell that to John Edwards.
 

Wreckem

Diamond Member
Sep 23, 2006
9,333
791
126
Originally posted by: senseamp
Originally posted by: SViscusi
Originally posted by: senseamp
Bow out so that Barack "Emty Suit" Obama is the Democrat nominee? No thanks.
Well sooner or later it is going to happen. The only question will be if Hillary continues to go scorched earth and damages the party.
Nothing will damage the party like nominating Obama. Clinton staying in the race gives the super delegates a chance to save the party.
Oh how I pray the democratic super delegates follow your suggestion.

Not only will McCain win the Presidecy, the GOP will regain the House and Senate.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY