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Question Case needed for business (non-gaming) PC

w2tq

Junior Member
Sep 16, 2020
8
3
36
I need a case for a PC for business use - not for gaming or high performance, running a Linux OS with a virtual machine.

The planned configuration:

1. Motherboard: Intel-based ATX (Intel quad core CPU with stock cooler; Z390 chipset; 16 GB RAM; one or two m.2 500 GB SSDs).

2. Graphics: MSI nVidia GeForce GTX 1650 dual monitor card with two DisplayPort outputs; two fans.

3. Optical: CD/DVD drive.

4. Power supply: 500 watts

No additional storage is contemplated at this time; perhaps one SATA SSD or magnetic drive in the future.

Previously, I have used Antec steel cases. My preference for this build is a steel, non-windowed case with front-mounted USB ports & power switch. A few of the cases I am considering are the following:

Antec Atlas 550 Mid-Tower Case
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1121234-REG/antec_server_chassis_atlas_chassis.html

Cooler Master Mid Tower Micro-ATX/ATX
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1128839-REG/cooler_master_nse_400_kkn2_system_cabinet.html

Corsair CC-9011075-WW Carbide Series 100R Mid-Tower (which has an acryllic window)
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1112579-REG/corsair_cc_9011075_ww_carbide_series_100r.html

Super Micro SC732D4-500B Mid-tower
https://www.supermicro.com/en/products/chassis/tower/732/SC732D4-500B

I am interested in comments about the foregoing cases and any suggestions for a suitable case for the planned configuration.
 
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damian101

Member
Aug 11, 2020
102
38
61
Pretty much all cases with a 5.25" optical drive bay should do just fine for that setup, as good airflow isn't very important with that hardware.
But as the Z390 motherboard will likely come with an internal USB-C port you might want to get a case that also has an USB-C port at the front, like one of these:
Chieftec Elox HC-10B
In Win C200
Fractal Design Define R6 USB-C
Fractal Design Define 7
 
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w2tq

Junior Member
Sep 16, 2020
8
3
36
damian101 -

Thanks for the suggestion. Yes, the board (an ASUS Prime Z390-A) does come with a USB-C connector.

From the specs: 1 x USB 3.1 Gen 1 front panel TypeC™ connector

I will look at the cases you mentioned.

Thanks again.
 
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Jimminy

Member
May 19, 2020
33
10
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damian101 -

Thanks for the suggestion. Yes, the board (an ASUS Prime Z390-A) does come with a USB-C connector.

From the specs: 1 x USB 3.1 Gen 1 front panel TypeC™ connector

I will look at the cases you mentioned.

Thanks again.
Isn't that usb 3.1 gen1 still just a 5 Gbs port? Maybe you could just use an adapter if you ever need to connect a usb c device. That way you could use a case you really like.
 

w2tq

Junior Member
Sep 16, 2020
8
3
36
Jimminy-

I believe that's correct - it's the form factor of the TypeC that's different. From the ASUS website:

Intel® Z390 Chipset :
4 x USB 3.1 Gen 2 port(s)
Intel® Z390 Chipset :
5 x USB 3.1 Gen 1 port(s) (3 at mid-board)
Intel® Z390 Chipset :
2 x USB 2.0 port(s) (2 at back panel, )
GL852G USB Hub :
4 x USB 2.0 port(s) (4 at mid-board)

From the manual:

Intel® Z390 Chipset
- 1 x USB 3.1 Gen 1 front panel TypeC™ connector
- 4 x USB 3.1 Gen 2 ports (3 Type-A [teal blue], 1 TypeC™ at back
panel)
- 4 x USB 3.1 Gen 1 ports (2 ports at back panel [blue], 2 ports at
mid-board)
- 6 x USB 2.0 ports ( 2 ports at back panel [black], 4 ports at
mid-board)
 
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w2tq

Junior Member
Sep 16, 2020
8
3
36
damian101 -

Thanks - that's quite a widget (the hub). Although I don't currently have anything that requires a TypeC socket, that will likely change as soon as I close the case after assembly.
 

piokos

Senior member
Nov 2, 2018
554
202
76
I need to choose a case for a pc for business use - not for gaming or high performance, running a Linux OS with a virtual machine.

The planned configuration:

1. Motherboard: Intel-based ATX (Intel quad core CPU with stock cooler; Z390 chipset; 16 GB RAM; one or two m.2 500 GB SSDs).

2. Graphics: MSI nVidia GeForce GTX 1650 dual monitor card with two DisplayPort outputs; two fans.

3. Optical: CD/DVD drive.

4. Power supply: 500 watts
Why not an OEM PC? You get a proper service and a proper B2B support - I understand this PC is for a small company (single person maybe?).
And if you can live without a dGPU (the part I don't understand in this setup - unless you're aiming at GPGPU) it would me many times smaller than an ATX with a 5.25" optical drive...

Anyway, for a DIY setup like you described, pretty much any case will do. Corsair 270R maybe?
But honestly, I would just go for mATX and a smaller case (like FD Core 1000)
 

w2tq

Junior Member
Sep 16, 2020
8
3
36
piokos -

The dual monitor card is needed for my existing dual monitors (image rendering; Photoshop, Gimp) - now connected via dual DVI-D cables. Since manufacturers are shifting to other formats (DisplayPort, HDMI, etc.), I need to move as well if I am going use the same monitor hardware (which have DisplayPort outputs in addition to the DVI-D terminals).
 
Last edited:
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HerrKaLeu

Member
Nov 23, 2016
98
5
41
piokos -

The dual monitor card is needed for my existing dual monitors (image rendering; Photoshop, Gimp) - now connected via dual DVI-D cables. Since manufacturers are shifting to other formats (DisplayPort, HDMI, etc.), I need to move as well if I am going use the same monitor hardware (which have DisplayPort outputs in addition to the DVI-D terminals).
There are many boards that have HDMI, DP and DVI to be used by the iGPU. If you don't need the power of a dGPU, no need to have one. Note they often are limited to use only 2 of the 3 ports, or have resolution limits. but with iGPU HDMI and DP you can run 2x4K monitors without needing a dedicated GPU (i do that). Note the CPU needs to actually support graphics (many of the Ryzen for example don't)
 

w2tq

Junior Member
Sep 16, 2020
8
3
36
HerrKaLeu -

Thank you. I need two, discrete DisplayPorts - I cannot daisy chain the monitors from the port on the motherboard, as the monitors use older DisplayPort technology that does not support daisy chaining. Hence the need for a discrete card.

Based upon my search, I found a limited number of cards with two DisplayPorts; many have a combination of one DisplayPort, one HDMI, and one DVI. The MSI identified in my initial post is one such card with two DisplayPort output.
 

HerrKaLeu

Member
Nov 23, 2016
98
5
41
HerrKaLeu -

Thank you. I need two, discrete DisplayPorts - I cannot daisy chain the monitors from the port on the motherboard, as the monitors use older DisplayPort technology that does not support daisy chaining. Hence the need for a discrete card.

Based upon my search, I found a limited number of cards with two DisplayPorts; many have a combination of one DisplayPort, one HDMI, and one DVI. The MSI identified in my initial post is one such card with two DisplayPort output.
I think there are HDMI to DP adapters Less common than the DP --> HDMI. I have an old HP business PC that only has 3 DP and that is how I hook it up to a TV with HDMI. If you are not connected via DVI, i assume you use low resolution. thsi is mission creep... but with a new PC you may also want new larger monitors. those have multiple inputs inc. HDMI. I know has nothing to do with your OP. But I recently upgraded to two 43" 4K monitors and you have to pry them out of my dead cold hands. i realize new monitors cost more than a dGPU. But damn are those great. No more scrolling forth and back on spreadhseets, multiple good sized windows open etc.
 

w2tq

Junior Member
Sep 16, 2020
8
3
36
As noted above, the monitors were selected for Photoshop, etc. I am now using dual DVI-D cables, which in my opinion are physically superior, but that format is being phased out. Passive adapters (and cable assemblies) may not work in some applications.
 

aigomorla

Cases and Cooling Mod PC Gaming Mod Elite Member
Super Moderator
Sep 28, 2005
18,200
931
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gaming cases is almost synonymous to what is considered enterprise gear with bling.
Well the high end ones.

What is your exact budget?
How much noise isolation is important?
How much dust is present in the location, as in do you require a lot of good placed intake filters? Ie... will it be sitting on carpet, or a high traffic location?
Seeing how you also picked a supermicro case, i am assuming you can go full size ATX case.
I really think you should not veto out all gaming cases, because the enthusiast tier, which is basically known as the "overpriced overclocking friendly server grade with bling" tier, may have some really solid cases you can pick, and also look nice sitting in the office.
 
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piokos

Senior member
Nov 2, 2018
554
202
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Please use proper quoting.
The dual monitor card is needed for my existing dual monitors (image rendering; Photoshop, Gimp) - now connected via dual DVI-D cables. Since manufacturers are shifting to other formats (DisplayPort, HDMI, etc.), I need to move as well if I am going use the same monitor hardware (which have DisplayPort outputs in addition to the DVI-D terminals).
Dual (even triple) monitor setup is nothing special. People do it even on basic laptops.
You're overcomplicating this for no reason.

You can easily adapt HDMI to either DP or DVI-D (especially the latter). It'll be many times cheaper than a dedicated GPU with dual DP and easier than building a DIY PC just to accommodate one.

Moving back to the OEM suggestion: you'll easily find a desktop with dual DP if you're worried about adapters. Example: OptiPlex 5080 (even SFF).
 

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