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Question Can't lower fan speed on EVGA CLC 240mm AIO (HELP)

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
970
41
91
So I just got my first AIO. The EVGA CLC 240mm but no matter what I do in BIOS or in Flow Control I can't get the fans to run at less than 1400RPM. BIOS reads the fan speed at 1400RPM connected to CPU_FAN header on MoBo and Flow Control reads the fan speed at 1050RPM but BIOS RPM is correct not flow control. Is there any way or trick to make the fan speed go down?
 

LOUISSSSS

Diamond Member
Dec 5, 2005
8,767
53
91
sorry, don't use "Flow Control" But on my gigabyte MB, we have a software to individually control each fan header to have a "fan curve" or a "Fixed RPM mode" which is what i have it set to. I see you have a gigabyte board... the software is called SIV (system information viewer)
 

Paperdoc

Golden Member
Aug 17, 2006
1,941
121
106
I think you have the readings confused. It appears that AIO system is designed to operate as many are. There is a single "fan" cable that plugs into your CPU_FAN header to get power and to return a speed signal. There is another cable that goes from the pump unit to a mobo USB2 header, and this is how the EGVA utility Flow Control monitors the system and controls the speeds both of the fans and of the pump. The two rad fans plug into a connector from the pump unit. Now, the connection to the CPU_FAN header can only convey ONE speed signal, and it is the PUMP speed, not the rad fans. So what you see as 1400 RPM there should match what Flow Control tells you is the PUMP speed. Your mobo has NO way to tell you the rad fans' speeds becasue there is no signal from them to the mobo. However, Flow Control DOES get that into through the USB header and displays that for you.So that 1050 rpm number you report IS the rad fans' speed. Note that Flow Control is how all of these speeds are controlled, not your BIOS settings. So use that tool to observe the readings and temperatures, and to make any adjustment you need for this AIO system.
 

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
970
41
91
I think you have the readings confused. It appears that AIO system is designed to operate as many are. There is a single "fan" cable that plugs into your CPU_FAN header to get power and to return a speed signal. There is another cable that goes from the pump unit to a mobo USB2 header, and this is how the EGVA utility Flow Control monitors the system and controls the speeds both of the fans and of the pump. The two rad fans plug into a connector from the pump unit. Now, the connection to the CPU_FAN header can only convey ONE speed signal, and it is the PUMP speed, not the rad fans. So what you see as 1400 RPM there should match what Flow Control tells you is the PUMP speed. Your mobo has NO way to tell you the rad fans' speeds becasue there is no signal from them to the mobo. However, Flow Control DOES get that into through the USB header and displays that for you.So that 1050 rpm number you report IS the rad fans' speed. Note that Flow Control is how all of these speeds are controlled, not your BIOS settings. So use that tool to observe the readings and temperatures, and to make any adjustment you need for this AIO system.
I need to read this with more time as it all makes sense and thanks for the reply as well. I made this video yesterday maybe it helps explain a little?
 

Paperdoc

Golden Member
Aug 17, 2006
1,941
121
106
I would have expected the Flow Control software to tell you the truth about the fans connected to its pump unit. On the other hand, third-party software sometimes needs to be calibrated to be able to give you the right readings. MORE importantly, such software normally gets ALL of its info to show you from the mobo headers. BUT in that AIO system, the rad fans are NOT reporting any speeds to the mobo, so that software can NOT tell you the rad fan speeds. It CAN tell you the speed of SOME things, but it simply makes assumptions about WHAT item is plugged into which mobo header. So the labels it tells you for the speeds it displays can be quite wrong!

In Flow control next to the slider for and and pump speed settings is an icon you click on to set up the fan "curve". That is a graph of what speed the fan should run versus what temperature the CPU is at. Now first of all, most such system have a few choices for how this is done. They typically include a "Normal" automatic control system with pre-programmed settings that wiill make constant adjustments of rad fan speeds (and maybe pump speeds, if you let it) based on the actual temperature measured by a sensor inside the CPU chip. Often you also have choices to set a fixed pump speed either full speed or some reduced "quiet" speed. And often you have also a choice to set your own "fan curve" instead of the pre-programmed one. So check how that is set.

Now, in choosing how this is done and what fan speeds you like, remember that the fan SHOULD speed up and slow down as your workload changes and heat generation changes. Although fan NOISE relates to fan speed, the resulting COOLING also is governed by fan speed. Your first priority must be to ensure your CPU DOES get enough cooling at all times.
 

EpicSurvivor

Senior member
Aug 14, 2012
970
41
91
I would have expected the Flow Control software to tell you the truth about the fans connected to its pump unit. On the other hand, third-party software sometimes needs to be calibrated to be able to give you the right readings. MORE importantly, such software normally gets ALL of its info to show you from the mobo headers. BUT in that AIO system, the rad fans are NOT reporting any speeds to the mobo, so that software can NOT tell you the rad fan speeds. It CAN tell you the speed of SOME things, but it simply makes assumptions about WHAT item is plugged into which mobo header. So the labels it tells you for the speeds it displays can be quite wrong!

In Flow control next to the slider for and and pump speed settings is an icon you click on to set up the fan "curve". That is a graph of what speed the fan should run versus what temperature the CPU is at. Now first of all, most such system have a few choices for how this is done. They typically include a "Normal" automatic control system with pre-programmed settings that wiill make constant adjustments of rad fan speeds (and maybe pump speeds, if you let it) based on the actual temperature measured by a sensor inside the CPU chip. Often you also have choices to set a fixed pump speed either full speed or some reduced "quiet" speed. And often you have also a choice to set your own "fan curve" instead of the pre-programmed one. So check how that is set.

Now, in choosing how this is done and what fan speeds you like, remember that the fan SHOULD speed up and slow down as your workload changes and heat generation changes. Although fan NOISE relates to fan speed, the resulting COOLING also is governed by fan speed. Your first priority must be to ensure your CPU DOES get enough cooling at all times.
I'll look into it. Thank you
 

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