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Cannot see anything on boot; how to trouble shoot graphics card?

enwar3

Golden Member
Jun 26, 2005
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I built this computer three or four years ago (athlon x2, radeon x800 on pci-e) and it's been running fine until one day (my sister says) the monitor stopped showing anything.

So I'm looking it over right now. The monitor is plugged in, the computer's plugged in, the cords are tight and plugged in. Furthermore, the motherboard has a led display for troubleshooting and according to the manual, the motherboard is responding and booting up as normal (I'm sure of this, I've used the codes before). Since the monitor works and the motherboard says it's booting up, I think something is wrong with the graphics card. But I don't know how to troubleshoot it. Any suggestions?
 
Jun 19, 2004
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There is no way to test without using another computer that works. Unless you tried the monitor on another computer or video source, you don't really know it works either
 

enwar3

Golden Member
Jun 26, 2005
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Ah I see. I tried the monitor on another source and it worked fine. Unfortunately, I don't have another build (or graphics card or motherboard) to test out the other components. Is there any other way to know what component is faulty? Barring that, what is the component that is most likely faulty?
 
Jun 19, 2004
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You can try re-seating the GPU or, try it in another pci-e slot if available. Do you or your sister know anyone who would let you try your GPU in their computer? It's most likely the graphics card but, you won't be able to pinpoint it without testing the card. Try a Mom and Pop computer place if there is no one else to help. Just take the card in and they will just charge a small fee while they check it out. It sounds like you are doing this long distance?
 

Arkaign

Lifer
Oct 27, 2006
20,646
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Probably the card, and might be actually lucky if it is (better than having damaged mobo for sure). X800 is a lot slower than even a $50ish 4650 :) So if you do find the card to be faulty, an improved replacement won't set you back much. GL!
 

enwar3

Golden Member
Jun 26, 2005
1,086
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Ah that's helpful to know! I will take it in somewhere and see if they'll check it out. I'm actually at home for a week so that's why I'm trying to mess around with it now.

Probably the card, and might be actually lucky if it is (better than having damaged mobo for sure). X800 is a lot slower than even a $50ish 4650 :) So if you do find the card to be faulty, an improved replacement won't set you back much. GL!
Oh nice! I didn't realize they still sold graphics cards that will work in my mobo! I built this computer like three years ago.....
 

Painman

Diamond Member
Feb 27, 2000
3,805
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Whip out the graphics card, turn the system on. You should get the one long, 3 short error code (BEEEEEP - beep - beep - beep).

Could be the card... might be the mobo. My nephew's X850 recently died. They bought a cheap 9600GT which actually destroys the X850 that died. In their case, it actually was the card.
 

enwar3

Golden Member
Jun 26, 2005
1,086
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Hmm I'll try taking the graphics card out.

I'm using an epox 9npa+ ultra and the graphics slot is a pci-e x16 so I think i'm limited to an 8400 or an 8600. Will I run into any troubles replacing my (current) ati card with a nvidia http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814130313 ? Or can I theoretically (if it is a faulty graphics card) just plug it in and run?
 

Modular

Diamond Member
Jul 1, 2005
5,027
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Hmm I'll try taking the graphics card out.

I'm using an epox 9npa+ ultra and the graphics slot is a pci-e x16 so I think i'm limited to an 8400 or an 8600. Will I run into any troubles replacing my (current) ati card with a nvidia http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814130313 ? Or can I theoretically (if it is a faulty graphics card) just plug it in and run?
First off, you aren't limited to those cards at all. You can use any card that will work in a pci-e 1.0 or 2.0 slot (they are backwards compatible and there isn't much advantage of 2.0 over 1.0 unless you are at the extreme high end anyways).

Second, I would stick with whatever card can be properly fed by your power supply. Give us the make and model as well as the amperage ratings for all the power rails if you can.

Third, I'm of the opinion that if you are going to just be replacing the video card you should stick with the same brand as the card that was in the system before. If you are planning on reinstalling Windows, then feel free to make the switch to nVidia if that's what you want. But in your case, simply switching graphics vendors without reinstalling Windows has caused a million people a million headaches. I'm not saying it can't be done, but I am warning that as a general rule, if you aren't very good at running driver sweepers/registry editing/file searching and nuking, you are asking for trouble in switching between GPU vendors.
 

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