Question can static electricity be reason for what I'm seeing?

daggs1

Member
Mar 9, 2018
167
7
81
Greetings,

following a previous thread I had (https://forums.anandtech.com/threads/is-my-conclusion-correct-solved.2602459) and now that I'm seeing the same behavior on 3 machines in my home, I was wondering if static electricity be reason?
I by my computer in parts and build them, I use antec cases and psu, both intel and amd cpus, usualy hsf from be quite, noctua, coolermaster and arctic.
the mbs are either asock, gb or asus and the ram is ether gskils or kingston. cpus are igp/apu, asus or sapphire.
so all the parts are good ones.
I have now three mbs with cpus, rams and hsf on them (two psus and two gpus), all of them show the same behavior as stated in the thread I've posted above.
e.g. all the fans and leds are on, screen stays black and the system don't post. one of the mbs has a qled indicator in which after boot, the vga led is still on. tried with both gpus in both slots on the machine.
I've decided to leave them standing unplugged for a few days and try again expecting them to work as I saw.
now I'm trying to understand why this is happening, is it possible static electricity is the reason for this?
I don't use static electricity wrist band, I read that if I touch the psu when it is plugged, it is the same and even if I touch the walls it is enough.

comments will be appreciated.

Thanks,

Dagg
 

Steltek

Platinum Member
Mar 29, 2001
2,925
657
136
do you mean the wall socket or the psu cable?
Wall sockets. Just because you have 3 prong outlets at the wall doesn't automatically mean the grounds are actually properly connected.

If you don't know, you can use a multimeter (if you have one) or buy a cheapo outlet tester at Lowes/Home Depot/Walmart to check this.
 

daggs1

Member
Mar 9, 2018
167
7
81
they SHOULD be grounds properly connected
question is, is there a way to verify without inviting a electrician?
 
Nov 26, 2005
14,937
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You have to physically pull the socket out of the wall to check. Sometimes the socket can be jumped to make it appear like it's properly grounded. And there's a chance not all sockets are properly grounded. But check the ones your PC is connected to. Find the right breaker and shut it off or if you don't know shut the whole house off.
 

igor_kavinski

Diamond Member
Jul 27, 2020
3,894
2,352
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I personally don't understand metal cases. Why not sturdy plastic? It's lighter and there's less chance of cutting yourself on the sharp edges.
 

daggs1

Member
Mar 9, 2018
167
7
81
If you don't know, you can use a multimeter (if you have one) or buy a cheapo outlet tester at Lowes/Home Depot/Walmart to check this.
I think it depends on the multimeter, I'll ask the hardware store next to my home

You have to physically pull the socket out of the wall to check. Sometimes the socket can be jumped to make it appear like it's properly grounded. And there's a chance not all sockets are properly grounded. But check the ones your PC is connected to. Find the right breaker and shut it off or if you don't know shut the whole house off.
to find out which is the relevant one, there is still a potential to shutdown the entire home, I think of trying a different socket in the house.

Certain Antec cases are known to have ESD issues, the Sonata for example.
I use this: https://www.newegg.com/p/N82E16811129070

Silly question, same monitor?
yes

Anything common between the 3 systems like a monitor, monitor cable, case, power cord, extension cord, house power, etc ?
they all connected to a dp kvm switch.
the switch was tested and found to be not the issue in my previous occurrence
in a day or two I'll get back to one of them, I'll connect everything inside and connect it in a different location at my home where a different setup is used

will report back.

Thanks
 

ch33zw1z

Lifer
Nov 4, 2004
35,531
14,817
146
If checking the outlets, use a multimeter or a simple outlet wiring tester like this

Klein Tools RT210 Outlet Tester, Receptacle Tester for GFCI / Standard North American AC Electrical Outlets, Detects Common Wiring Problems https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01AKX8L0M/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_i_S68S70WY2SRKQEDHNNH3

If any don't come back as good, then start opening covers

A couple tips on that though.

1. Turn off the breaker before you do it. Remember, the outlet tester already told you that wiring is off, but that doesn't mean you can't get zapped good, iteans it's more likely.

2. After turning off the breaker, and opening the outlet cover, double check power is removed using a multimeter.

3. Take this opportunity to map your outlets on paper. Whatever way work for you, ie number the outlets and correlating breaker.

4. Something a bit more can help in the mapping realm. I mapped my breakers to outlets and it saves a lot of time later, plus increases knowledge and safety if things go wrong sometime.

Case Compatible with Klein Tools ET310 AC Circuit Breaker Finder Kit & Integrated GFCI Outlet Tester. Electrical Tools Storage Organizer Holder Bag for Adapters, Batteries and Accessories (Box Only) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09JBWLH2B/ref=cm_sw_r_apan_i_YHAE56BMSJPGTD1VD5QF?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

5. Just because an outlet tests bad, doesn't mean the wiring at that outlet is off.

Outlets are wired in a chain, and it's very possible the problems are upstream somewhere. Ask me how I know lol 😉

6. If you ever not sure if an outlet is hot, get that multimeter asap. Don't risk it. Electricity flowing thru your body is very bad and can leave lasting damage.

Don't assume because two outlets are near each other that those outlets are wired on the same circuit.

And yes, dirty or poor power can cause all sorts of stupid issues.
 
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