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Can I use my 2wire 2701HG-B as a bridge with another router?

Amitojc

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Dec 4, 2009
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I have another router TP-LINK. I was wondering if I can have my 2wire modem and the TP-Link router be bridged together. That is I have the 2 wire in one room and want to have the router in another room be connected on the same wireless network. From there I can plug a computer in the the TP-Link and be connected to the internet. I was wondering if this is possible and how would I go about doing it.
 

BrianTho2010

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Jul 27, 2011
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I have not used a 2wire modem/router in a while but IIRC it is possible. That said, it largely depends on which ISP you got the router from. Certain ISP's will lock down the router whereas others will give you relative free rein over it.

EDIT: If your TP-Link router allows you to connect to a wifi network for uplink then you can do it without any configuration on the 2wire side. essentially the TP-Link would route all wired traffic in that room to the 2wire and the 2wire would see all computers on the TP-Link side as one IP due to NAT. It is certainly not the best solution, but its workable.
 
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drebo

Diamond Member
Feb 24, 2006
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In a 2Wire, it's called "DMZ Plus" mode.

Configure the TP-Link to get DHCP on its WAN interface, plug the WAN interface to a LAN port on the 2Wire, log in to the 2Wire and configure the TP-Link as the "DMZ Plus" device, and reset the TP-Link. At that point, it should have your public IP as its WAN IP.

As for doing a full bridge and running PPPoE on the TP-Link through the 2Wire, no you cannot do that.
 

JackMDS

Elite Member
Super Moderator
Oct 25, 1999
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If the Router that suppose to connect to the main Router (i.e., be a Wireless Bridge) is capable to be configured as a Wireless bridge, or can be flashed with DD-WRT then you probably can do it.



:cool:
 

Amitojc

Member
Dec 4, 2009
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In a 2Wire, it's called "DMZ Plus" mode.

Configure the TP-Link to get DHCP on its WAN interface, plug the WAN interface to a LAN port on the 2Wire, log in to the 2Wire and configure the TP-Link as the "DMZ Plus" device, and reset the TP-Link. At that point, it should have your public IP as its WAN IP.

As for doing a full bridge and running PPPoE on the TP-Link through the 2Wire, no you cannot do that.
What do you mean by public IP. I turned on DMZ mode for the TP-link router and from there does it give me the ability to have my TP-link router not have to be plugged into the 2wire router WAN but rather take the wireless signal from the 2wire and send that out. Does that make sense? Let me know if you do not understand what I am trying to do. Thanks.
 

BrianTho2010

Member
Jul 27, 2011
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In a 2Wire, it's called "DMZ Plus" mode.

Configure the TP-Link to get DHCP on its WAN interface, plug the WAN interface to a LAN port on the 2Wire, log in to the 2Wire and configure the TP-Link as the "DMZ Plus" device, and reset the TP-Link. At that point, it should have your public IP as its WAN IP.
I am not seeing how that will configure the TP-Link to forward all of its traffic through the Wireless interface. Based on what you said I can see how it would work wired (essentially a convoluted switch), but wirelessly I am not seeing it.

Note: I am not saying I dont believe you, just that I dont understand how that would work.
 

Amitojc

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Dec 4, 2009
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Its okay. We are trying a new plan. There are a couple of options. The thing is that we have a printer that is a network printer with no wireless card in one room. In the other room there is a 2wire dsl modem that we have. We just want to make the printer to work on the network. This is for a small business.

So there are a couple of options we can do. First we can try to bridge the 2wire and a router i have which is the TP-Link. I talked to TP-link and this is what they told me but I do not think it works correctly.

[FONT=&quot]Dear sir[/FONT],[FONT=&quot][/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot]Thank you very much for your calling.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]1. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]If you want to connect your wireless modem to tplink router wirelessly, please make sure your wireless[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]modem can support bridge mode also.[/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]2. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]please try to log into tplink management page and configure tplink router as bridge mode.[/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot]For more details about the configuration of tplink, please refer to:[/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot]3. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]please also log into your wireless modem’s management page and do the same configuration on it.[/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot]4. [/FONT][FONT=&quot]After that, please try to do the ping test on your pc which is connected to the tplink router.[/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot]Start->run box, type in”cmd”, and you can see a black window come up:[/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot]Please type “ping +the ip address of your wireless modem”, if you can get 4 replies that means the [/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot]connection between the router and your wireless modem has been established.[/FONT]​
[FONT=&quot]If not, I’m afraid there is something wrong with your configuration

Second, is to buy another router, and bridge the two routers together. What I mean by that is we buy another TP-link router or netgear router, and bridge those together by plugging 1 router directly into the 2wire and have those 2 routers bridged wireless. Is that possible?

Third option is to do a power line which is 20 bucks on amazon. That might be the cheapest and easiest if we cant think of anything else. I am not sure what power line is but from what I have read is that it will take a cat 5 from the 2wire modem and plug it into the power plug and then put the other adapter in the other room and the signal will carry via the power cables. That might be the best and easiest way right?

What do you guys think is the best option?
[/FONT]
 

BrianTho2010

Member
Jul 27, 2011
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The easiest way is to add a wifi card to your desktop. You are already running wifi so that is the simplest solution. if you do not have a space PCIE or PCI slot you can purchase a USB or even a ethernet to wifi adapter. http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-WNCE2001-Universal-Internet-Adapter/dp/B003KPBRRW

The ethernet over power AC lines does work, but if you are in an older building it may not work well, and even with newer wiring you are not guaranteed it will work. Anand has done testing with them and seen some success but transfer rates peaked at 40mbit IIRC.
 
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Amitojc

Member
Dec 4, 2009
186
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The thing is that printer there only has a parallal jack or a Ethernet jack. So are you saying that I plug the printer's ethernet into the laptop? The laptop has wireless card already built in. Or are you saying to get a wireless adapter for the printer?

I am thinking you are saying the later. So when I get that wireless adapter I would plug the ethernet into the printer and it should be able to connect to our wifi we have in our business. Also does that netgear have the ability to process our password for our wifi? How would you enter it in. Thanks for your help but that sounds like a good solution.
 

Emulex

Diamond Member
Jan 28, 2001
9,759
1
71
if you have u-verse you want the 3801hgv - it's hella faster (dual core) and over-allocates so you if you are on the fringe you can run it at 110% bitrate to get 32/5 (24/3) (4HD) where the older modems would not work over 100% and you'd be stuck at 25/2 (19/1.5)(3HD).

with the older u-verse modem i just couldn't get the highest tier (i needed the 3meg up! 1.5 was the suck) plus the 3801 has better qos so when you are upping at 3meg it doesn't ping lag out like the older modems.

i just use the buffalo in auto-AP mode and let the 2wire do the routing - it works great. no problems for 25 devices.
 

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