• Guest, The rules for the P & N subforum have been updated to prohibit "ad hominem" or personal attacks against other posters. See the full details in the post "Politics and News Rules & Guidelines."

Can I run my DDR4 3000MHz at it's full potential given my current CPU+MOBO Combo?

TheDarkKnight

Senior member
Jan 20, 2011
321
4
81
I have a 2x8GB set of Patriot Viper DDR4 3000MHz memory sticks. They are XMP 2.0 verified. They would be running @ 1500 MHz with a voltage of 1.35V and 16-16-16-36 (CL-RCD-RP-RAS) according to the "Extreme Memory Profile" data which is "Enthusiast (Certified)".

So, I know for a fact my memory is good to go at that speed but will my motherboard and CPU work without smoking or "burning down the house" @ that speed?

I have an Intel SkyLake G4500 @ 3.5GHz installed in an ASRock H110M-ITX/ac. In the BIOS they have an "OC Tweaker" screen where they, I guess, "allow", me to set all those crazy numbers up above individually. I'm not sure why they didn't just have an option to use "XMP v2.0". That would have been too easy for the consumer I guess?

I've never ran this memory at anything past 2133MHz as that is the default it runs at without going into any areas into the BIOS that I am not real familiar with. Is it safe to run my DDR4 3000MHz @ it's maximum with this combination of CPU and motherboard without damaging them. And if I do this, do I have to get a better cooler than the stock G4500?

If I boost my memory clock from 1066MHz to the 1500MHz and I boost the voltage from 1.2V to 1.35V per the XMP 2.0 profile, does that "automatically" force the CPU to run faster and work harder as well?

I've never overclocked anything in my life. I guess I bought these chips way before they were even close to being standardized by JEDEC (DDR4 3000MHz, that is). I got them for a good price at that time but I've never used them to the full potential. And I would like to do that but in a safe way. Do I need to upgrade my motherboard? My CPU? What's the best move here?

Thanks for reading!
 
Last edited:

Ken g6

Programming Moderator, Elite Member
Moderator
Dec 11, 1999
15,494
2,538
55
I didn't think it was possible to run RAM faster than standard on an H-series motherboard. But maybe ASRock has some tricks I don't know about. This shouldn't damage your motherboard. It may cause your CPU to run hotter, won't improve performance significantly, and there's a small chance it could damage your CPU's memory controller.
 

TheDarkKnight

Senior member
Jan 20, 2011
321
4
81
Well, in the BIOS there is a specific "OC Tweaker" screen that definitely lets me change memory settings so my guess is that it's possible. Unless, when I get in the BIOS and start changing things it validates my input and refuses to accept my changes, something along those lines. But that seems highly unlikely. But that's why I'm here asking questions. Just because I can do something doesn't mean I will or should.

Edit: Although, you may be right:
https://www.asrock.com/mb/Intel/H110M-ITXac/index.us.asp?cat=Memory&Model=H110M-ITX/ac&Vendor=
This memory support page on ASRock does not show any verified speeds past 2133MHz. So why the dog and pony show in the BIOS with the "OC Tweaker" screen? I guess I bought the wrong CPU. Maybe they should have some logic in the BIOS not to show the OC screen if the CPU doesn't support it.

This little bullet point on my motherboards product description page (H110M-ITX/ac):
"- Supports Intel® Extreme Memory Profile (XMP) 2.0"
leads me to believe it's more about the CPU I bought than the motherboard. I know that my memory is XMP 2.0 compatible. The bullet point above suggests that the motherboard is XMP 2.0 compatible. So, yeah, it's looking like it's the G4500 that just won't play ball with the other kids.

Okay, you didn't tell me what I wanted to hear to feel safe in using these @ their full potential on my current system so I will not be changing the status quo anytime soon on "it". I guess my only solution then as I suggested above is to upgrade to a new motherboard and CPU that supports these faster speeds. And I just so happened to have recently purchased an AMD 2200G along with an ASRock A320M motherboard that supports an OC to 2933 I think.

I've been on the fence about my new purchase so I've been researching everything I can before I actually open the packages and start building. I still feel pretty good about my decision.

Thank You for the good information.
 
Last edited:

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,984
6,908
126
Yeah, ASRock's "OC Tweaker" for RAM, is just for the timings. With that CPU, and that chipset, you can't bump the freq. up above 2133. Sorry.

But I do have some confirmation, that the AMD A320 chipset, while it doesn't support OC either, WILL support "RAM OC" -> Freq. above 2133, if used with higher-speed RAM.

But just a warning, Ryzen-family CPUs are somewhat picky about RAM. Just because your RAM is rated DDR4-3000 with Intel XMP 2.0, does't mean that it will run at 3000 (or even 2933) on AM4.
 

TheDarkKnight

Senior member
Jan 20, 2011
321
4
81
Yeah, ASRock's "OC Tweaker" for RAM, is just for the timings. With that CPU, and that chipset, you can't bump the freq. up above 2133. Sorry.

But I do have some confirmation, that the AMD A320 chipset, while it doesn't support OC either, WILL support "RAM OC" -> Freq. above 2133, if used with higher-speed RAM.

But just a warning, Ryzen-family CPUs are somewhat picky about RAM. Just because your RAM is rated DDR4-3000 with Intel XMP 2.0, does't mean that it will run at 3000 (or even 2933) on AM4.
The G4500 is the real dealbreaker though, right? Or did I buy both the wrong parts and neither are good for overclocking?

I've read that about Ryzen CPUs so I've been reading a lot. I checked the memory support page for my ASRock A320M-HDV motherboard. It looks like it will support an 8GB DDR4 3000MHz Patriot Viper memory stick @ 2933MHz. It appears "stick" is the keyword also. From the memory support web page it says SS and not DS.

https://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/A320M-HDV/index.us.asp#MemoryRR

If I can't use my 2x8GB DDR4 3000 sticks in this motherboard in dual-channel mode, it's the end of the line for this setup. It's going back. That would kill the gaming performance and that's the only reason I bought it. I would buy some compatible DDR4 memory kits if it didn't require being raped and pilfered for a set.
 

VirtualLarry

No Lifer
Aug 25, 2001
51,984
6,908
126
SS and DS means, single-sided and dual-sided. Not single-stick, and dual-stick.

If you have two sticks of RAM, you can run them in dual-channel.
 

Bouowmx

Golden Member
Nov 13, 2016
1,122
519
146
You can't run above 2133 MT/s, but nothing prevents you from taking advantage of the low-latency XMP timings at 2133 MT/s.

Set RAM volts to that specified in XMP profile: 1.35 V. 3000 MT/s 16-16-16-36 becomes 2133 MT/s 12-12-12-26.

Time (ns) = Cycles / (Transfer rate in GT/s) * 2

2-channel 2133 MT/s is a lot of bandwidth for just a 2-core (no SMT) processor. There is little to gain by going to 3000 MT/s. However, lower latency is welcome any time, regardless of bandwidth.

To avoid calculating number of cycles of each timings, download Thaiphoon Burner. It is freeware, and this method is not about overwriting SPD.
  1. Near top, click Read and select either address, since both memory modules use same timings.
  2. Near top, click Editor.
  3. At top, click Profile, Import from XMP.
  4. Click drop-down list of Min SDRAM cycle time, to activate Fine correction.
  5. Set Fine correction to 0.
  6. Adjust value of Min SDRAM cycle time so that it is close to 0.938 ns (equal to 1 / (2.133 GT/s) * 2). Use Fine correction to actually get to that time.
  7. The timings for 3000 MT/s have been recalculated for 2133 MT/s. Record the timings (column with values ending in T) somewhere. Apply them in BIOS.
EDIT:

There may be additional timings in HWiNFO (that seems to be where you got the language).
Inverse: Cycles = (Time in ns) * (Transfer rate in GT/s) / 2
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: TheDarkKnight

Shmee

Memory and Storage, Graphics Cards
Super Moderator
Sep 13, 2008
5,349
996
126
I would get a Z170 or B350 board, and a better CPU. Ryzen 1600 or i5 6600k would be a good place to start. But then what will this computer be used for?
 

TheDarkKnight

Senior member
Jan 20, 2011
321
4
81
I would get a Z170 or B350 board, and a better CPU. Ryzen 1600 or i5 6600k would be a good place to start. But then what will this computer be used for?
Light gaming. My intentions were to replace my 2-year old SkyLake G4500 processor. It seems pairing the G4500 up with DDR4 3000 was like attaching a ball and chain to the ankle of an elephant. I've been using it for 2 years at 2/3 of it's potential. It's a sad sad story. But I will make it a happy ending. I'll move these sticks to the new AMD 2200G based system which has the equivalent graphics horsepower of a discrete RX 550 approximately anyways, so I've read. And my 3000MHz memory sticks are a perfect match up for a cheap gaming system. And better than what I've had for the past 2 years using crappy Intel HD 530 graphics.

People keep recommending better, faster hardware. But that better faster hardware cost lots mo' money. I'm recycling my 16GB 3 year old memory. I spent $140 for a new CPU and motherboard to get RX 550 graphics performance. And I'll end up selling my old SkyLake CPU and motherboard to offset the $140 for Gods sake. How can I make any better decisions?

Is it the best? No! Is it the fastest? No! Is it twice as fast as what I have now? Yes! Is it the "Best Bang for the Buck!" Yes!!!
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY