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Can any of you political demagogues explain . . .

noproblems

Senior member
Mar 11, 2000
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. . . how it works if neither Bush nor Gore has the total number of required electoral votes? Would it mean that Bush would automatically win since the Republicans have the majority in the House of Representatives?
 

CyberSax

Banned
Mar 12, 2000
1,253
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That scenario is highly unlikely, but I think the final does vote does fall in the hands of the Congress. And if the Democrats in Congress had at least half a brain, they would vote for Bush too :p
 

kranky

Elite Member
Oct 9, 1999
20,999
109
106
If no presidential candidate receives a majority of the Electoral College votes cast, the U.S. House of Representatives chooses the president from the candidates. The selection is made by a vote of the state delegations in the House, with each delegation allotted one vote. Only two presidents have been selected in this manner: Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams. If no candidate for vice president receives a majority vote, the U.S. Senate makes the selection from the top candidates for the office. Each senator has a single vote.

 

noproblems

Senior member
Mar 11, 2000
617
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O.K., let me ask you this then:
Let's just say that there was a tie in the House and the vote does go to the Senate.... What would happen if there was a tie in the Senate as well? Would Al Gore get to break the tie????
 

noproblems

Senior member
Mar 11, 2000
617
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Nobody answered my question, so I figured I would bring the thread back to the top. Does anyone know the answer?
 

piku

Diamond Member
May 30, 2000
4,049
1
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That Al Gore breaking the tie thing is interesting, but I would think they have something in case it did happen. Vice presidents run all the time, its not like this is the first.
 

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