Calling all soldering pros

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yhelothar

Lifer
Dec 11, 2002
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So I'm trying to fix the backlight on my phone that went through water damage and I found a fix online, but it requires very fine soldering.

k750solder.jpg


The chip capacitor shown here is about 1mm × .5mm

Here's another image to get an idea of how small it is
2714965080_6ae98e40b4.jpg


The zoomed in pic above refers to the bottom right area.

How would I solder this?
 

jacc1234

Senior member
Sep 3, 2005
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You are going to need a low wattage iron or one that you can control the temperature. Also, a magnifier is a must. Use a fine chisel tip and tin both ends of the wire you will be using. Now push the wire against one of the points and touch the iron to it. You want it hot enough so that it melts the solder almost instantly. Basically you want to be able to hold the wire in place and hold the tip of the iron to it for less the 1s and have the solder on the phone and wire melt. A heat sink might also be useful if you are able to attach it to the components you are soldering.

If your iron is not hot enough you will have to hold it in place too long and it could overheat the component you are soldering.

Good luck!
 

effowe

Diamond Member
Nov 1, 2004
6,021
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Cut a wire to proper length, tip the ends, solder like any other job. A magnifying glass and proper lighting would help.
 

yhelothar

Lifer
Dec 11, 2002
18,408
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Would I be shit out of luck with a standard tip?
I gave it a good go yesterday with one, with temp control. I found it nearly impossible to get it soldered on with little enough solder so that it doesn't end up bridging the neighboring capacitors.
Anyways, I just found another one of my phone on ebay for parts/repair for cheap.
 

AlienCraft

Lifer
Nov 23, 2002
10,539
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Good luck! No way my 53+ yo eyes are focusing on that, even with magnification, long enough to deal with it. Maybe when I was 23....
1. Tin your wire with a little more solder than necessary, so when it reaches temp, the solder will flow into the joint. At that moment, remove the iron, and DO NOT JIGGLE IT while it cools.
Good Luck,
 

yhelothar

Lifer
Dec 11, 2002
18,408
39
91
Good luck! No way my 53+ yo eyes are focusing on that, even with magnification, long enough to deal with it. Maybe when I was 23....
1. Tin your wire with a little more solder than necessary, so when it reaches temp, the solder will flow into the joint. At that moment, remove the iron, and DO NOT JIGGLE IT while it cools.
Good Luck,

So first get some solder onto the wire, and then place the wire onto the caapcitor quickly before the solder solidifies?
 

Ksyder

Golden Member
Feb 14, 2006
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So first get some solder onto the wire, and then place the wire onto the caapcitor quickly before the solder solidifies?

i don't think that is your best bet. tin the wire, press it to the pcb and then hit it with the soldering iron and the solder should flow to the joint. trying to tin the wire and quickly press it into place might cause problems because the solder hardens too quickly. better off pre-tinning the wire, and then remelting it again at the joint to flow the solder to whatever you are attaching to.
 

PM650

Senior member
Jul 7, 2009
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So first get some solder onto the wire, and then place the wire onto the caapcitor quickly before the solder solidifies?
I think what he's saying is to hold the iron on the wire before/while you press it against the end of the cap. This way, it'll be easier to use the molten solder on the wire to heat up the cap end, rather than hitting the tinned wire+cap with the iron while they're both still cold. This will help a bit if the end of the cap is soldered to a plane.
 
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