California Must Be Doing Something Right Despite Trump hating it so much

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
9,922
6,507
136
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/arti...alifornia-state-s-economy-vastly-outpaces-u-s

Just about every policy Donald Trump imposes to make his America great is opposed by the world's fifth-largest economy. That would be California, which is growing faster and outperforming the U.S. in job growth, manufacturing, personal income, corporate profits and the total return of its bonds. The most populous U.S. state, with 39.5 million people, supplanted the U.K. as No. 5 in the world with an equivalent gross domestic product of more than $2.7 trillion, increasing $127 billion last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.



Trump attributes the prosperity of the U.S. economy during his 17 months as president to his evisceration of environmental regulations and other consumer protections, abandoning the Paris climate accord, aggressively deporting undocumented immigrants, prohibiting people from certain nations (mostly majority Muslim) from emigrating to the U.S., prosecuting sanctuary cities for protecting immigrants, cutting taxes most for corporations and the rich, and appointing a Supreme Court justice who just wrote the 5-4 decision limiting the rights of tens of millions of workers.

Jerry Brown, California's longest-serving governor, takes the opposite approach, and his state thrives. California is the global leader among governments committed to safeguarding the planet from climate change. Corporate California's revenues from clean energy companies dwarf those of the other 49 states or any country. The state's auto emissions law, now contested by the Trump administration, is the nation's most stringent. The legislature voted to become a sanctuary state, preventing police from participating in federal enforcement or asking people about their immigration status. The same assembly also made California the first state to declare a $15-an-hour minimum wage and to require solar panels on new homes. Its citizens approved Proposition 30, temporarily raising personal income and sales taxes to fund education.

California's Growth Outpaces the Nation's GDP

California's 4.9 percent increase in GDP last year was more than twice the gain for the U.S. and enabled the state's jobless rate to slide to 4.2 percent, the lowest on record since such data was compiled in 1976. Per capita income since 2013 grew 20.5 percent, making California the perennial No. 1. Among the biggest states sharing the Trump agenda, Texas remains an also-ran with less than a third of California's $31.8 billion in receipts from agriculture, forestry and fishing and $63 billion less than California's $289 billion in equivalent GDP as the nation's largest manufacturer, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. While the Texas unemployment rate is lower at 4.1 percent, California's is falling faster and its total workforce of 17 million is 37 percent greater and has increased 2 million during the past five years, more than any other state.

Investors also make California the best-performing state, with 462 native companies in the Russell 3000 index producing a 587 percent total return (income plus appreciation) during the past decade, 262 percent the past five years, 76 percent the past two years, and 27 percent the past year — easily surpassing the Russell 3000's total return of 371 percent, 154 percent, 59 percent, and 22 percent, respectively. In the market for state and local government debt, California also is superior, representing more than 20 percent of the No. 1 BlackRock Strategic Municipal Opportunities Fund, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Although the president said climate change is a Chinese hoax, California takes warming seriously. No country or state has more companies that derive at least 10 percent of their revenue from clean energy, energy efficiency or green technology, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. (California has 24 such companies.) The average annual revenue from clean energy companies is 11.8 percent of the sales from the state's major companies, up from 4.5 percent five years ago.

Green Pays
Twenty-four clean-energy companies in the state vastly outperform their domestic peers.

The average revenue of California clean energy companies is 140 percent of their domestic peers' average sales. Only five years ago, the ratio was 49 percent. Their revenue grew 33 percent last year when their counterparts throughout the U.S. reported less than half that increase.

Trump and his enablers in the Republican Party fail to grasp the reality that clean energy increasingly is good for business, especially in California. "He can't distinguish the white horse of victory from the pale horse of death, to quote the Apocalypse," said Brown during an interview at his Sacramento office last week. "He's riding a dead horse. That will become obvious to more and more people."

Brown said that the market forces driving California ahead of other states are inexorable: "China also appears to be ready to adopt ever increasing requirements for zero emissions vehicles. That's the biggest market. That is the market, and they have to sell into it with electric cars and California is trying to do the same thing as well as the states that follow us. It can't be resisted. It's too powerful a force."

Investors already are benefiting from the trend, reflected in analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg showing the sales of California clean companies rising 29 percent, 16 percent and 11 percent in 2018, 2019 and 2020, compared to 17 percent, 8 percent and 6 percent for similar out-of-state firms.


Shares of California's clean companies, which spend twice as much on research and development as their out-of-state peers, gained an average of 70 percent the past two years, or 23 percentage points more than the average return for the rest of the country. At the same time, California's clean companies created twice as many jobs as their counterparts elsewhere. Productivity also is unsurpassed in California, where the revenue per employee of clean companies rose 7 percent last year, while it fell 3 percent outside the state, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

The new California law mandating that new homes be built with solar energy is a boon for the renewable industry. San Francisco-based Sunrun Inc., whose shares appreciated 122 percent the past 12 months, will report sales growth of 36 percent in 2018, according to analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. The same analysts predict Sunrun will appreciate another 21 percent by December.

That's another way of saying companies have a better chance of becoming greater when they make their business in California.




Why doesn't this surprise me?
 

hal2kilo

Lifer
Feb 24, 2009
23,425
10,320
136
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/arti...alifornia-state-s-economy-vastly-outpaces-u-s

Just about every policy Donald Trump imposes to make his America great is opposed by the world's fifth-largest economy. That would be California, which is growing faster and outperforming the U.S. in job growth, manufacturing, personal income, corporate profits and the total return of its bonds. The most populous U.S. state, with 39.5 million people, supplanted the U.K. as No. 5 in the world with an equivalent gross domestic product of more than $2.7 trillion, increasing $127 billion last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.



Trump attributes the prosperity of the U.S. economy during his 17 months as president to his evisceration of environmental regulations and other consumer protections, abandoning the Paris climate accord, aggressively deporting undocumented immigrants, prohibiting people from certain nations (mostly majority Muslim) from emigrating to the U.S., prosecuting sanctuary cities for protecting immigrants, cutting taxes most for corporations and the rich, and appointing a Supreme Court justice who just wrote the 5-4 decision limiting the rights of tens of millions of workers.

Jerry Brown, California's longest-serving governor, takes the opposite approach, and his state thrives. California is the global leader among governments committed to safeguarding the planet from climate change. Corporate California's revenues from clean energy companies dwarf those of the other 49 states or any country. The state's auto emissions law, now contested by the Trump administration, is the nation's most stringent. The legislature voted to become a sanctuary state, preventing police from participating in federal enforcement or asking people about their immigration status. The same assembly also made California the first state to declare a $15-an-hour minimum wage and to require solar panels on new homes. Its citizens approved Proposition 30, temporarily raising personal income and sales taxes to fund education.

California's Growth Outpaces the Nation's GDP

California's 4.9 percent increase in GDP last year was more than twice the gain for the U.S. and enabled the state's jobless rate to slide to 4.2 percent, the lowest on record since such data was compiled in 1976. Per capita income since 2013 grew 20.5 percent, making California the perennial No. 1. Among the biggest states sharing the Trump agenda, Texas remains an also-ran with less than a third of California's $31.8 billion in receipts from agriculture, forestry and fishing and $63 billion less than California's $289 billion in equivalent GDP as the nation's largest manufacturer, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. While the Texas unemployment rate is lower at 4.1 percent, California's is falling faster and its total workforce of 17 million is 37 percent greater and has increased 2 million during the past five years, more than any other state.

Investors also make California the best-performing state, with 462 native companies in the Russell 3000 index producing a 587 percent total return (income plus appreciation) during the past decade, 262 percent the past five years, 76 percent the past two years, and 27 percent the past year — easily surpassing the Russell 3000's total return of 371 percent, 154 percent, 59 percent, and 22 percent, respectively. In the market for state and local government debt, California also is superior, representing more than 20 percent of the No. 1 BlackRock Strategic Municipal Opportunities Fund, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Although the president said climate change is a Chinese hoax, California takes warming seriously. No country or state has more companies that derive at least 10 percent of their revenue from clean energy, energy efficiency or green technology, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. (California has 24 such companies.) The average annual revenue from clean energy companies is 11.8 percent of the sales from the state's major companies, up from 4.5 percent five years ago.

Green Pays
Twenty-four clean-energy companies in the state vastly outperform their domestic peers.

The average revenue of California clean energy companies is 140 percent of their domestic peers' average sales. Only five years ago, the ratio was 49 percent. Their revenue grew 33 percent last year when their counterparts throughout the U.S. reported less than half that increase.

Trump and his enablers in the Republican Party fail to grasp the reality that clean energy increasingly is good for business, especially in California. "He can't distinguish the white horse of victory from the pale horse of death, to quote the Apocalypse," said Brown during an interview at his Sacramento office last week. "He's riding a dead horse. That will become obvious to more and more people."

Brown said that the market forces driving California ahead of other states are inexorable: "China also appears to be ready to adopt ever increasing requirements for zero emissions vehicles. That's the biggest market. That is the market, and they have to sell into it with electric cars and California is trying to do the same thing as well as the states that follow us. It can't be resisted. It's too powerful a force."

Investors already are benefiting from the trend, reflected in analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg showing the sales of California clean companies rising 29 percent, 16 percent and 11 percent in 2018, 2019 and 2020, compared to 17 percent, 8 percent and 6 percent for similar out-of-state firms.


Shares of California's clean companies, which spend twice as much on research and development as their out-of-state peers, gained an average of 70 percent the past two years, or 23 percentage points more than the average return for the rest of the country. At the same time, California's clean companies created twice as many jobs as their counterparts elsewhere. Productivity also is unsurpassed in California, where the revenue per employee of clean companies rose 7 percent last year, while it fell 3 percent outside the state, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

The new California law mandating that new homes be built with solar energy is a boon for the renewable industry. San Francisco-based Sunrun Inc., whose shares appreciated 122 percent the past 12 months, will report sales growth of 36 percent in 2018, according to analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. The same analysts predict Sunrun will appreciate another 21 percent by December.

That's another way of saying companies have a better chance of becoming greater when they make their business in California.




Why doesn't this surprise me?
I won't take long for a California ex-patriot to come along and dash your fantasy. Wait for it............
 

glenn1

Lifer
Sep 6, 2000
25,383
1,013
126
https://www.bloomberg.com/view/arti...alifornia-state-s-economy-vastly-outpaces-u-s

Just about every policy Donald Trump imposes to make his America great is opposed by the world's fifth-largest economy. That would be California, which is growing faster and outperforming the U.S. in job growth, manufacturing, personal income, corporate profits and the total return of its bonds. The most populous U.S. state, with 39.5 million people, supplanted the U.K. as No. 5 in the world with an equivalent gross domestic product of more than $2.7 trillion, increasing $127 billion last year, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.



Trump attributes the prosperity of the U.S. economy during his 17 months as president to his evisceration of environmental regulations and other consumer protections, abandoning the Paris climate accord, aggressively deporting undocumented immigrants, prohibiting people from certain nations (mostly majority Muslim) from emigrating to the U.S., prosecuting sanctuary cities for protecting immigrants, cutting taxes most for corporations and the rich, and appointing a Supreme Court justice who just wrote the 5-4 decision limiting the rights of tens of millions of workers.

Jerry Brown, California's longest-serving governor, takes the opposite approach, and his state thrives. California is the global leader among governments committed to safeguarding the planet from climate change. Corporate California's revenues from clean energy companies dwarf those of the other 49 states or any country. The state's auto emissions law, now contested by the Trump administration, is the nation's most stringent. The legislature voted to become a sanctuary state, preventing police from participating in federal enforcement or asking people about their immigration status. The same assembly also made California the first state to declare a $15-an-hour minimum wage and to require solar panels on new homes. Its citizens approved Proposition 30, temporarily raising personal income and sales taxes to fund education.

California's Growth Outpaces the Nation's GDP

California's 4.9 percent increase in GDP last year was more than twice the gain for the U.S. and enabled the state's jobless rate to slide to 4.2 percent, the lowest on record since such data was compiled in 1976. Per capita income since 2013 grew 20.5 percent, making California the perennial No. 1. Among the biggest states sharing the Trump agenda, Texas remains an also-ran with less than a third of California's $31.8 billion in receipts from agriculture, forestry and fishing and $63 billion less than California's $289 billion in equivalent GDP as the nation's largest manufacturer, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. While the Texas unemployment rate is lower at 4.1 percent, California's is falling faster and its total workforce of 17 million is 37 percent greater and has increased 2 million during the past five years, more than any other state.

Investors also make California the best-performing state, with 462 native companies in the Russell 3000 index producing a 587 percent total return (income plus appreciation) during the past decade, 262 percent the past five years, 76 percent the past two years, and 27 percent the past year — easily surpassing the Russell 3000's total return of 371 percent, 154 percent, 59 percent, and 22 percent, respectively. In the market for state and local government debt, California also is superior, representing more than 20 percent of the No. 1 BlackRock Strategic Municipal Opportunities Fund, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Although the president said climate change is a Chinese hoax, California takes warming seriously. No country or state has more companies that derive at least 10 percent of their revenue from clean energy, energy efficiency or green technology, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance. (California has 24 such companies.) The average annual revenue from clean energy companies is 11.8 percent of the sales from the state's major companies, up from 4.5 percent five years ago.

Green Pays
Twenty-four clean-energy companies in the state vastly outperform their domestic peers.

The average revenue of California clean energy companies is 140 percent of their domestic peers' average sales. Only five years ago, the ratio was 49 percent. Their revenue grew 33 percent last year when their counterparts throughout the U.S. reported less than half that increase.

Trump and his enablers in the Republican Party fail to grasp the reality that clean energy increasingly is good for business, especially in California. "He can't distinguish the white horse of victory from the pale horse of death, to quote the Apocalypse," said Brown during an interview at his Sacramento office last week. "He's riding a dead horse. That will become obvious to more and more people."

Brown said that the market forces driving California ahead of other states are inexorable: "China also appears to be ready to adopt ever increasing requirements for zero emissions vehicles. That's the biggest market. That is the market, and they have to sell into it with electric cars and California is trying to do the same thing as well as the states that follow us. It can't be resisted. It's too powerful a force."

Investors already are benefiting from the trend, reflected in analyst estimates compiled by Bloomberg showing the sales of California clean companies rising 29 percent, 16 percent and 11 percent in 2018, 2019 and 2020, compared to 17 percent, 8 percent and 6 percent for similar out-of-state firms.


Shares of California's clean companies, which spend twice as much on research and development as their out-of-state peers, gained an average of 70 percent the past two years, or 23 percentage points more than the average return for the rest of the country. At the same time, California's clean companies created twice as many jobs as their counterparts elsewhere. Productivity also is unsurpassed in California, where the revenue per employee of clean companies rose 7 percent last year, while it fell 3 percent outside the state, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

The new California law mandating that new homes be built with solar energy is a boon for the renewable industry. San Francisco-based Sunrun Inc., whose shares appreciated 122 percent the past 12 months, will report sales growth of 36 percent in 2018, according to analysts surveyed by Bloomberg. The same analysts predict Sunrun will appreciate another 21 percent by December.

That's another way of saying companies have a better chance of becoming greater when they make their business in California.




Why doesn't this surprise me?

California is a boom/bust state which is in its boom phase currently. There are examples of governments using a high tax/services model being successful like CA and also failing utterly like Detroit, and likewise you can find both outcomes in low tax/services governments.
 

sdifox

No Lifer
Sep 30, 2005
94,991
15,119
126
I wonder how much impact Brexit has on UK economy. Not knocking Cali of course.
 

Homerboy

Lifer
Mar 1, 2000
30,856
4,974
126
California is a boom/bust state which is in its boom phase currently. There are examples of governments using a high tax/services model being successful like CA and also failing utterly like Detroit, and likewise you can find both outcomes in low tax/services governments.

Could this same thing not be said about virtually every state and every nation?
 

Jaskalas

Lifer
Jun 23, 2004
33,437
7,503
136
First, yes, California is doing something right.

But... it's also symptomatic of wealth concentration. California tends to trend bigger in Wall Street's direction. Unfortunately that also means people get priced out faster and left behind. Income Inequality rages there as well. Like America, being a rich and wealthy economy does not mean it is roses and sunshine for everyone in the State.
 

glenn1

Lifer
Sep 6, 2000
25,383
1,013
126
Could this same thing not be said about virtually every state and every nation?

Yes but CA is a bit more extreme because it relies heavily on very progressive income taxes which tend to plummet precipitously in bad times. Rich Californians fuel booms when they cash stock options, etc. during good times. And in bad times they often harvest stock losses which reduce their taxable income. It's not like I'm making up the boom/bust thing to make CA look bad as recent experience from other recessions has shown. It's not inherently good or bad, just something to be aware of.
 

Starbuck1975

Lifer
Jan 6, 2005
14,698
1,909
126
I won't take long for a California ex-patriot to come along and dash your fantasy. Wait for it............
:D

California is undoubtedly a great state. I am just waiting for someone to explain exactly how liberal policies made it great.

First, California of course benefits from geography and climate, which no one can attribute to politics.

Silicon Valley is a product of Navy investments during WW2 and later NASA investments after WW2.

Aerospace and the industries that emerged from it are a product of the white welfare military spending some of you complain so much about.

The UC system, once the crown jewel of California, received considerable investments in the 50s and 60s when California was a solid red state.

Silicon Valley is run by a bunch of white dudes.

Hollywood is run by a bunch of sexual predators.

Jerry Brown, who I admire and in another thread I said would make a great President, is a great governor because he embraced fiscal conservatism.

So honest question, what specific liberal policies can you point to that made California great?
 

dank69

Lifer
Oct 6, 2009
35,321
28,571
136
California is a boom/bust state which is in its boom phase currently. There are examples of governments using a high tax/services model being successful like CA and also failing utterly like Detroit, and likewise you can find both outcomes in low tax/services governments.
When comparing California to other states I will remember that it is a boom/bust state like all other states.
 

Moonbeam

Elite Member
Nov 24, 1999
72,424
6,086
126
Fortunately for the other states they will be like California in 10 to 20 years. The negative ions blowing in off the Pacific ocean raise California's IQ by many points
 
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Noah Abrams

Golden Member
Feb 15, 2018
1,041
109
76
In the last ten years, CA has lost 1 million residents

GDP this, etc that, these fancy numbers don’t tell the whole story. As they say you can find any stat to prove a point.

If it is such a great state for the average American who the liberals profess to care about, why is CA losing population? The proof is in the pudding

I personally know people who have had enough of CA and finally took the exit

Contrary to the myth, it is liberal policies which result in Darwinism at its worst. The survival of the very fittest.
 
Last edited:

Thebobo

Lifer
Jun 19, 2006
18,592
7,673
136
In the last ten years, CA has lost 1 million residents

GDP this, etc that, these fancy numbers don’t tell the whole story. As they say you can find any stat to prove a point.

If it is such a great state for the average American who the liberals profess to care about, why is CA losing population? The proof is in the pudding

I personally know people who have had enough of CA and finally took the exit

Contrary to the myth, it is liberal policies which result in Darwinism at its worst. The survival of the very fittest.


So you personally know people who have had enough, is that supposed to be proof of something? I personally know people who moved to california, so there!

BTW Lots of states are losing people West Virginia, MIssissippi, Wyoming. All bastions of liberalism!
 
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MrSquished

Lifer
Jan 14, 2013
21,224
19,714
136
:D

California is undoubtedly a great state. I am just waiting for someone to explain exactly how liberal policies made it great.

First, California of course benefits from geography and climate, which no one can attribute to politics.

Silicon Valley is a product of Navy investments during WW2 and later NASA investments after WW2.

Aerospace and the industries that emerged from it are a product of the white welfare military spending some of you complain so much about.

The UC system, once the crown jewel of California, received considerable investments in the 50s and 60s when California was a solid red state.

Silicon Valley is run by a bunch of white dudes.

Hollywood is run by a bunch of sexual predators.

Jerry Brown, who I admire and in another thread I said would make a great President, is a great governor because he embraced fiscal conservatism.

So honest question, what specific liberal policies can you point to that made California great?

Who knew. California is actually a bastion of conservative successes. Amazing shit.
 

Noah Abrams

Golden Member
Feb 15, 2018
1,041
109
76
So you personally know people who have had enough, is that supposed to be proof of something? I personally know people who moved to california, so there!

BTW Lots of states are losing people West Virginia, MIssissippi, Wyoming. All bastions of liberalism!

Right. Those states are not considered great places and perhaps rightly so. All these fancy numbers for CA mean not much. Since their relevance to the average person is tenuous at best.
 

ivwshane

Lifer
May 15, 2000
32,219
14,905
136
:D

California is undoubtedly a great state. I am just waiting for someone to explain exactly how liberal policies made it great.

First, California of course benefits from geography and climate, which no one can attribute to politics.

Silicon Valley is a product of Navy investments during WW2 and later NASA investments after WW2.

Aerospace and the industries that emerged from it are a product of the white welfare military spending some of you complain so much about.

The UC system, once the crown jewel of California, received considerable investments in the 50s and 60s when California was a solid red state.

Silicon Valley is run by a bunch of white dudes.

Hollywood is run by a bunch of sexual predators.

Jerry Brown, who I admire and in another thread I said would make a great President, is a great governor because he embraced fiscal conservatism.

So honest question, what specific liberal policies can you point to that made California great?

You don't appear to have a clue what liberal policies are. That's what happens when you "both sides" the shit out of everything, you make assumptions and don't bother looking at facts.

Keep fucking that chicken though, I'm sure some day you'll find a nugget.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
20,361
5,113
136
It ain't all sweetness and light when you look under the hood. Average home price in the bay area is now a million bucks. Unfunded liability's are past 120 billion, we have 60 billion worth of deferred maintenance on our infrastructure, and the price tag on our 60 billion dollar train just chooched through 200 billion. That all adds up to a lot of billions
I hope and pray that the state can hang together for 5 more years until I can evacuate to a nice quiet fly over red state.
I'll wave to all you guys as you jet past.
 
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ivwshane

Lifer
May 15, 2000
32,219
14,905
136
It ain't all sweetness and light when you look under the hood. Average home price in the bay area is now a million bucks. Unfunded liability's are past 120 billion, we have 60 billion worth of deferred maintenance on our infrastructure, and the price tag on our 60 billion dollar train just chooched through 200 billion. That all adds up to a lot of billions
I hope and pray that the state can hang together for 5 more years until I can evacuate to a nice quiet fly over red state.
I'll wave to all you guys as you jet past.

Don't let the door hit you on the way out.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
20,361
5,113
136
Don't let the door hit you on the way out.
I won't. I won't look back either. Our once wonderful state is over crowded and dirty. Traffic here in the bay area is nothing short of a nightmare, and those darn lefties keep trying to repeal prop 13. That would add $13000 a year to my tax bill overnight.
 

sao123

Lifer
May 27, 2002
12,648
201
106
Yep California is so great...

More poverty and welfare than the next 2 states total combined.
In fact California has 30% of the nations total Welfare recipients by count and by dollar amount.

Just out of its first energy crisis, and California's Chief Utility regulator says another one is imminent.

California's several decades of homelessness & housing problems are caused by its own fresh supply of NIMBYism.

NIMBYism also contributing to the California 3 decade drought.

California residents are so disgusted with California's social policies, they would prefer to break the state into 3.

According to 46 out of the other 49 states, if California suddenly fell into the ocean, the country would instantly be a better place.

Sounds like a wonderful place to be!
 

ivwshane

Lifer
May 15, 2000
32,219
14,905
136
I won't. I won't look back either. Our once wonderful state is over crowded and dirty. Traffic here in the bay area is nothing short of a nightmare, and those darn lefties keep trying to repeal prop 13. That would add $13000 a year to my tax bill overnight.

You won't be missed.
 

Greenman

Lifer
Oct 15, 1999
20,361
5,113
136
You won't be missed.
Are you sure? Cause I'm pretty sure at least one or two will miss me, maybe even 3.
I won't miss stepping in human shit on the sidewalk, or BART stations full of passed out junkies and used needles. Not having to run a gauntlet of day laborers at home depot will be nice as well.
I will miss the sierras though, some of the most beautiful country on earth right there.
 

ivwshane

Lifer
May 15, 2000
32,219
14,905
136
Are you sure? Cause I'm pretty sure at least one or two will miss me, maybe even 3.
I won't miss stepping in human shit on the sidewalk, or BART stations full of passed out junkies and used needles. Not having to run a gauntlet of day laborers at home depot will be nice as well.
I will miss the sierras though, some of the most beautiful country on earth right there.

Yeah, I'm positive. Good riddance.
 

Starbuck1975

Lifer
Jan 6, 2005
14,698
1,909
126
Are you sure? Cause I'm pretty sure at least one or two will miss me, maybe even 3.
I won't miss stepping in human shit on the sidewalk, or BART stations full of passed out junkies and used needles. Not having to run a gauntlet of day laborers at home depot will be nice as well.
I will miss the sierras though, some of the most beautiful country on earth right there.
I was in San Francisco a few months ago, and the amount of human feces and urine on the streets surprised me, especially because I didn’t recall it being such an issue last year. Did you know there is a sidewalk poop tracking app? Saw a few needles, lots of broken glass and parked cars with smashed in windows.
 

Indus

Diamond Member
May 11, 2002
9,922
6,507
136
I was in San Francisco a few months ago, and the amount of human feces and urine on the streets surprised me, especially because I didn’t recall it being such an issue last year. Did you know there is a sidewalk poop tracking app? Saw a few needles, lots of broken glass and parked cars with smashed in windows.

I live in NYC. There was 1 murder in my zip code in the last 10 years. That doesn't mean we don't have crappy parts like the Bronx in NYC either.

1 part of San Fran is not California.
 

woolfe9998

Lifer
Apr 8, 2013
16,188
14,091
136
:D

So honest question, what specific liberal policies can you point to that made California great?

OK, you can start with the core contention in the OP's article: that California's clean energy policies have encouraged impressive growth in that sector. If you have reasons for disagreeing with that assertion, fine. But you're asking a question the answers to which are contained in the very article which is the subject of the thread.